Health Matters: Providing Services for Cancer Patients

first_imgAt first glance, it may just look like any other boutique—but the merchandise inside Cookie’s Place is all designed to care for cancer patients. “Cookie’s Place was started by Cookie Needle and she was a breast cancer patient and she wanted a place where women could go to find really all the needs while they are going through treatment,” explained Jacylin Friedman, Cookie’s Place Boutique coordinator. From wigs to scarves to skincare, the boutique provides patients with the products and services they need, including acupuncture and yoga classes. “Acupuncture with oncology patients has been shown to help with neuropathy as well as relaxation in helping with different symptoms,” said Friedman. Located inside the Regional Cancer Center, the shop also has a variety of post-mastectomy garments, lymphedema garments, prosthetics, and essential oils. “It really us a place for everyone who is on their cancer journey to come and get that supportive care. “We love being able to help these ladies. It really is a wonderful thing to be able to offer these products,” she said. Offering cancer patients a one-stop-shop where they can get the guidance, products, and support they need during their cancer journey. Health Matters: Managing the Stress of COVID-19 June 7, 2021 Health Matters: A Partnership in Medical Care June 13, 2021 AdvertisementTags: boutiqueCancerHealth MattersLee Healthregional cancer centerstore Advertisement Health Matters: Helping Children with Chest Wall Malformation June 13, 2021 AdvertisementView More Health Matters video segments at LeeHealth.org/Healthmatters/ Lee Health in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of health care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For more than 100 years, we’ve been providing our community with personalized preventative health services and primary care to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Lee Health – Caring People. Inspiring Care. Visit LeeHealth.orgcenter_img RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Health Matters: Scoliosis Treatment for Children June 13, 2021 AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisementlast_img read more

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TSX heads for slightly higher open amid lower commodities, debt concerns

Malcolm Morrison The Toronto stock market appeared set for a slightly higher open while commodity prices declined and traders looked ahead to the latest reading on American retail sales. The European debt crisis also weighed on investors’ minds as Spain was forced to pay higher yields on its bonds, along with disappointing corporate earnings. Toronto stock market dips on weakness in the energy and financials sectors Facebook LinkedIn Twitter S&P/TSX composite hits highest close since March on strength of financials sector Keywords Marketwatch Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The Canadian dollar was little changed on currency markets, off 0.04 of a cent to 100.12 cents US. U.S. futures signalled a positive start to the week with the Dow Jones industrial futures up 39 points to 12,827, the Nasdaq futures gained 6.8 points to 2,700.2 and the S&P 500 futures were ahead 3.9 points to 1,368.9. The yield on Spain’s 10-year government bonds jumped to 6.1% on the secondary market, according to financial data provider FactSet. It had closed at 5.93% Friday after a week of persistent market tension. The 10-year bond yield surged toward seven per cent late last year, a rate considered unsustainable for a country over a long period. The country is caught between the needs to lower debt by cutting spending and to boost growth by investing more. Spain is expected to enter its second recession in three years this quarter, with the country’s central bank forecasting its economy will contract 1.7% this year. Commodity prices continued to lose ground over demand concerns with the May crude contract on the New York Mercantile Exchange down 41 cents to US$102.42 a barrel. Copper prices drifted a penny lower to US$3.62 a pound. Copper has lost about eight per cent so far this month amid data showing slowing growth in China, which is the world’s biggest consumer of the metal. Copper is also known as an economic bellwether because it is used in so many industries. And the June bullion contract in New York lost $12.10 to US$1,648.10 an ounce. Traders looked ahead to an expected rise in retail sales in the U.S. during March as auto sales dipped but sales in chain stores remained solid. Economists looked for a 0.4% rise following a 1.1% gain in February. Corporate earnings were also expected to set the trading tone this week. However, expectations for earnings have been ratcheted much lower after three years of solid double-digit increases. There was little to cheer about from Monday’s reports. Mattel shares fell six per cent in pre-market trading as first-quarter profit dropped 53% to US$7.8 million or two cents a share. Adjusted earnings were six cents per share. That was a penny below what analysts surveyed by FactSet were expecting. Citigroup shares were off 0.66% after handing in earnings of 95 cents a share, six cents less than expectations. In other corporate news, energy company Nexen Inc. (TSX:NXY) has received regulatory approvals clearing the way for an expansion at its oilsands operation in northern Alberta. The latest approvals are for two more extraction pads at the Long Lake operation, which has experienced numerous delays due to technical issues. CAE Inc.’s military division won more than $950 million worth orders in its 2012 financial year including nearly half in its latest quarter, putting the training simulator company on track to beat last year’s sales. Among the orders was $170 million of training and services contracts from Brunei, announced Monday. The TSX lost ground for a sixth, straight week last week, losing 0.5%, leaving the main index up about 100 points or 0.7% for the year to date on worries about a slowing global economy, falling corporate profits and rising risk from the European debt crisis. New York markets fell for a second week. Toro European bourses were mixed with London’s FTSE 100 index down 0.5%, Frankfurt’s DAX gained 0.49% and the Paris CAC 40 was ahead 0.67%. Asian markets closed mostly lower, however, as traders focused on data released Friday showing China’s economy slowed to a 8.1% growth rate in the January-March quarter, the slowest in almost three years. In the fourth quarter, growth was 8.9%. Japan’s Nikkei slid 1.4%, South Korea’s Kospi was down 0.9% after the Bank of Korea lowered its 2012 economic growth outlook to 3.5%, from a December estimate of 3.7%. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng fell 0.7% and Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 lost 0.4%. TSX gets lift from financials, U.S. markets rise to highest since March Related news read more

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RBC Insurance clients to receive personalized support

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Toronto-based RBC Insurance Services Inc. is embarking on a program to provide personalized support to clients who are navigating the health-care system after being diagnosed with an illness. New website aims to match consumers with insurance products The initiative is the result of a partnership with Richmond Hill, Ont.-based Medical Confidence, which would provide support to RBC Insurance clients who hold individual disability and critical illness policies or are clients of the firm’s group short- and long-term disability programs. The services included within this initiative include one-on-one support from a registered nurse; assistance through any referral process for a specialist; and help with scheduling and preparing for appointments. “We see clients unable to work or even manage their daily activities as they struggle with their medical conditions,” says Cathy Preston, vice president of individual markets with RBC Insurance in a statement. “By actively getting involved and providing hands on support and guidance, we are reducing recovery times and patients are more engaged in their treatment and overall health.” Another element of the program involves assistance in finding appropriate and available specialists for the client’s specific illness. Medical Confidence has a database network of more than 6,000 specialists across the country that cover health-care conditions such as cancer, diabetes, arthritis, surgeries, coronary disease and orthopedics. “The majority of Canadians do not know what to do or where to turn when faced with a serious medical condition. The ever-increasing wait times have become the norm, making it challenging even for primary care practitioners to find an available specialist,” says Angela Johnson, president of Medical Confidence, in a statement. “Through an innovative navigation platform we provide RBC clients a customized and caring approach to obtaining the right treatment at the right time.” Photo copyright: rosinka79/123RF Tessie Sanci RBC Insurance adds caregiver rider to disability plans Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Keywords Critical illness insurance,  Disability insuranceCompanies RBC Insurance Fewer Canadians have disability insurancelast_img read more

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Climate change, aging population major economic factors in forecast for 2020s

first_imgBeautiful caucasian elderly couple in the park in autumn 123RF A new economic report says the next decade in Canada will be shaped increasingly by the twin forces of climate change and demographic disruption from an aging population.“By 2030, Canada’s economy could look significantly different,” says the RBC report released Monday, dubbed “Navigating the 2020s.” Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Keywords Economic forecastsCompanies Royal Bank of Canada Economy lost 68,000 jobs in May OECD raises outlook for Canadian economic growth this year Stagflation is U.S. economists’ biggest fear, SIFMA says “A country whose economic identity has long been bound to natural resource extraction will accelerate its transformation into a services economy,” the report adds.An older population will present governments with challenges that include rising health-care costs and elder benefits, the report by RBC economists forecasts.It predicts 650,000 people will be living in Canadian seniors’ residences or nursing homes in 2030, up from 450,000 now, and the extra capacity will cost at least $140 billion to build.Meanwhile, the proportion of working-age Canadians is expected to fall to 1.7 for every youth and senior by 2030, down from 2.3 in 2010.A recent federal report found Canada’s climate warmed 1.7 degrees C between 1948 and 2016, twice the global rate, the RBC report notes.It says dealing with the growing urgency of climate change could influence Canadian farmers’ crop choices, put strains on ports and coastal roads, determine the location of new residential developments and drive up insurance costs.“Canada’s investment in pollution abatement and control increased tenfold in the past decade and will demand even more resources in the 2020s,” the RBC report notes.It cites a recent Canada Energy Regulator (CER) study that forecasts energy use per capita will decline almost 9% by 2030. A shift from coal to natural gas in electricity generation will reduce emissions intensity, the report notes.Domestic demand for oil and refined petroleum products will decline due to increased transportation efficiencies, but oil production will grow from 4.9 million barrels per day in 2020 to 5.7 million bpd in 2030 thanks to rising exports, the RBC report says.The installed capacity of wind and solar in Canada is expected to increase by nearly 50% in the next decade but will account for only 9% of electricity generation in 2030, the report notes, again citing CER figures.The findings are consistent with trends identified by the Calgary-based Canadian Energy Research Institute.“I see energy’s role as maturing in the sense that we’re likely to continue to see growth in the oil industry and the electricity industry,” said CEO Allan Fogwill in an interview.“The growth in the natural gas industry is very tightly linked to growth in LNG (exports),” he added.CERI bases its outlook on successful construction of three oil export pipelines from Western Canada — the Trans Mountain expansion, Line 3 replacement project and Keystone XL — along with greater capacity for crude-by-rail shipments. Dan HealingCanadian Press last_img read more

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Fund managers must prep for future shocks

first_img Fed keeps key rate near zero, sees inflation as ‘transitory’ Keywords Coronavirus,  Pandemics,  Fund managers,  Investment funds Regulators aim to root out pandemic-driven liquidity issues The report calls on fund managers to enhance their capacity to cope with future shocks.“Concerns around the valuation of portfolio assets have clearly emerged, especially for real estate funds for which the crisis could have a more significant impact over the longer term,” the ESMA said.As a result, it called on fund managers to “enhance their preparedness to potential future adverse shocks that could lead to a deterioration in financial market liquidity and valuation uncertainty.”Among other things, the recommendations cover aligning funds’ investment strategy, liquidity profile and redemption policy; ongoing supervision of liquidity risk assessments and valuations; and increasing the availability of liquidity management tools.Steven Maijoor, chair of the ESMA, reported that a coordinated supervisory exercise “revealed shortcomings that must be addressed in order to enhance funds’ preparedness to future shocks.”“We have identified a number of priority areas that funds and supervisors should focus on to address potential liquidity risks in the fund sector. This will contribute to ensuring investor protection, orderly markets and financial stability,” he said. Related news European regulators are calling for action from fund managers amid concerns about liquidity in the investment fund sector in the face of future negative shocks.The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) published a report on Friday examining the ability of investment funds with significant exposures to assets such as corporate debt and real estate to deal with future liquidity and valuation shocks. Singapore’s financial regulator invests in innovation Financial analysis of charts and graphs on tablet illustration pedrosek/123RF James Langton Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Share this article and your comments with peers on social medialast_img read more

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Commissioners have listened to people impacted by dementia – now will government act?

first_imgCommissioners have listened to people impacted by dementia – now will government act? Dementia Australia welcomes the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety’s Final Report: Care, Dignity and Respect.Since September 2018, people living with dementia, their families and carers have entrusted the Commissioners with their views, personal experiences and often traumatic stories.Dementia Australia CEO Maree McCabe said the Final Report captures the essence of those issues and demonstrates the Commissioners have listened to Australians impacted by dementia.“Within the 148 recommendations are 14 key areas with a specific focus on dementia. We welcome these recommendations and now call on the federal government to demonstrate they are serious about making quality dementia care core business for aged care in Australia,” Ms McCabe said.“These recommendations broadly cover the need for clearer support pathways; assessing the impact of dementia-specialist support; introducing new regulations on chemical and physical restraint; calling for a review of aged care standards as they relate to quality dementia care; fast-tracking a national aged care worker registration program and specifying that, as a condition of approval of aged care providers; and all workers engaged by providers who are involved in direct contact with people seeking or receiving services in the aged care system undertake regular training about dementia care. Other recommendations focus on the importance of carers, the impact of quality indicators and a need to clarify roles and responsibilities across the sector.“Dementia Australia will be focusing on the detail of the Final Report and will continue to advocate to the federal government to ensure they act on this once in a generation opportunity to transform dementia care and the aged care system overall.“People with the lived experience of dementia have told us – if you get dementia care right you get it right for everyone.”Dementia Australia has provided the federal government with a clear plan on what is needed to deliver quality dementia care and to respond to the Final Report – this includes:Dementia Support Pathways: An integrated and specialist service response with a single access point, that is a centralised, national telephone and online service that sits alongside My Aged Care.Transformed Dementia Workforce Capability: An integrated approach to build dementia capability and expertise of the aged care workforce by mandating minimum levels of dementia education. Developing dementia practice leaders will support the application of this learning as well as promote practice change. This will ensure the aged care workforce has the necessary skills, knowledge and capability to provide quality care and support to people living with dementia.Dementia-Friendly Design: Developing and embedding a set of robust, evidence-based and practice-informed dementia-friendly standards. This will enable physical environments that support people living with dementia to be as independent as possible.“We urge the government to demonstrate their commitment to the 472,000 Australian living with dementia and the 1.6 million people involved in their care,” Ms McCabe said.“We will continue our dialogue with the federal government to ensure the dementia-related recommendations will be supported in the 2021-22 federal budget to be handed down in May.”Dementia Australia’s Roadmap to Quality Dementia Care can be downloaded here.Dementia Australia is the source of trusted information, education and services for the estimated half a million Australians living with dementia, and the almost 1.6 million people involved in their care. We advocate for positive change and support vital research. We are here to support people impacted by dementia, and to enable them to live as well as possible. No matter how you are impacted by dementia or who you are, we are here for you. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:aged care, Australia, Australian, Chemical, Commission, dementia, Dementia Australia, dementia care, dialogue, education, federal budget, federal government, Government, research, royal commission, workforcelast_img read more

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Unravelling secret of a critical immune cell for cancer immunity

first_imgUnravelling secret of a critical immune cell for cancer immunity WEHI researchers have discovered a key differentiation process that provides an essential immune function in helping to control cancer and infectious diseases.Dr Michael Chopin, Professor Stephen Nutt andMr Shengbo ZhangThe research, published in Science Immunology, is the first to show a new factor – DC-SCRIPT – is required for the function a particular type of dendritic cell – called cDC1 – that is essential in controlling the immune response to infection.Led by Professor Stephen Nutt, Dr Michael Chopin and Mr Shengbo Zhang, it defines the role for a new regulatory protein – DC-SCRIPT – in producing dendritic cells.At a glanceWEHI researchers have uncovered a key step in the formation of a particular type of dendritic cell – called cDC1 – in controlling the immune response to infection.The research highlights the importance of DC-SCRIPT in the production of effective dendritic cells.Through gaining a better understanding of how dendritic cells are produced, researchers hope to be able to determine a way of directing the body to produce large numbers of dendritic cells, to enable it to better fight off cancer and infections.DC-SCRIPT essential in the production of cancer-fighting cellsDendritic cells are immune cells that activate ‘killer’ T cells, which are vital for clearing viral infections and for triggering a response to cancer tumours.DC-SCRIPT positive cells (red) activating animmune response (blue T cells)Credit: Wang Cao and Shengbo ZhangThrough gaining a better understanding of how this process works, researchers hope to be able to determine a way of directing the body to produce large numbers of dendritic cells, to enable it to better fight off cancer and infections.Professor Nutt said the research paper highlighted the importance of DC-SCRIPT in the production of effective dendritic cells.“What we found, is that without this new factor, the cells develop poorly, and their capacity to fight infection and cancer, or to clear a parasite, is diminished,” he said.“The next stage of our research is to try and work out how we can get the body to produce these particular dendritic cells, cDC1s, in large volumes in order to boost the body’s natural tumour response.”Harnessing the body’s natural response to infectionDr Chopin said he was confident cDC1s held the clues to improving immunity to viruses and tumours.“This paper clearly shows DC-SCRIPT is one of the regulators of dendritic cell production. As a result of this study, we’re now focussed on ways we could harness this to increase dendritic cell production,” he said.“We now have a biomarker to follow when we expand this elusive cell type, which we will continue to test in pre-clinical models.”This research lays the foundation for future studies into dendritic cell production and their clinical applications in response to tumours.“We have generated new tools, allowing us to trace these cells within the tumour and observe how they behave in the tumour environment,” Dr Chopin said.This work was made possible with funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Victorian Government.WEHI authorsShengbo Zhang, Hannah D. Coughlan, Simona Seizova, Andrew Kueh, Daniel Brown, Wang Cao, Nicolas Jacquelot, Angela D’Amico, Andrew M. Lew, Yifan Zhan, Christopher J. Tonkin, Gordon K. Smyth, Michaël Chopin and Stephen Nutt. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:biomarker, environment, gordon, Government, health, immune cells, immune response, immunology, infection, infectious diseases, Medical research, production, Professor, research, research council, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, WEHIlast_img read more

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BioFrontiers scientist tackles a childhood disease of the heart

first_img“Dr. Leinwand’s work in the field of cardiovascular genetics and muscle biology is impressive, and CCF is excited to support her study on pediatric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Because there are so few therapeutic options for children with this inherited heart disease, her findings could have a significant impact on how children are treated and their outcomes,” says CCF Founder and Executive Director Lisa Yue. “Pediatric patients have a much more difficult time with this disease,” says Leinwand. “Some of the myosin protein mutations appear only in infants and young children, and these cause a version of the disease that is much more aggressive. Heart transplants are difficult at this age, but without them these patients have about a 40 percent mortality rate. BioFrontiers Chief Scientific Officer Leslie Leinwand, has been studying the motor protein, myosin, for 25 years. This important protein is responsible for making muscles contract, including one vital muscle: your heart. Myosin drives heart muscle contraction, and when this protein is mutated, it has devastating effects on the cardiovascular system. There are more than 300 known mutations in myosin, many of which cause a disease called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common genetic heart disease, occurring in 1 in 500 individuals, and it is the leading cause of sudden death in young people. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes thickened in parts, forcing the heart to work overtime pumping blood throughout the body. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail There are 1,000 to 5,000 new cases of pediatric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosed each year. The pediatric disease is relatively rare, with twelve children diagnosed out of every million, and the majority of patients are diagnosed before their first birthdays. Beyond the clear genetic causes, the other causes of the disease in children are not well understood and research on the subject is sparse. Fewer than 25 percent of these childhood cases have an identifiable cause, despite standardized and rigorous testing. Many adults manage this disease successfully by avoiding strenuous, competitive exercise and using a pacemaker. Children with this disease don’t have as many options as adults.center_img Published: March 6, 2013 Leinwand recently won a $45,837 grant from the Children’s Cardiomyopathy Foundation (CCF) to study the differences in the myosin mutations in adult and pediatric populations. She also plans to look at the effects of a small molecule drug on the pediatric versions of the protein in a test tube. This small molecule drug has promise for treating adults with heart failure. “We would like to get beyond just treating the symptoms, and I believe we have the potential to treat the root cause of this disease,” says Leinwand. “If we can focus on preventing the heart muscles from thickening in the first place, we can get away from pacemakers and transplants, and have more success in giving these young patients a better chance in living with this disease.” Categories:Science & TechnologyNews Headlineslast_img read more

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CHD Group; SEEDS sign MoU for building Disaster Resilience in India

first_img News The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story By EH News Bureau on January 3, 2018 Dr Edmond Fernandes, CEO, CHD Group and Dr Manu Gupta, Executive Director, SEEDS signed the MoU in New DelhiCHD Group and SEEDS have signed a strategic MoU recently in New Delhi to build disaster resilient communities in India. Dr Edmond Fernandes, CEO, CHD Group and Dr Manu Gupta, Executive Director, SEEDS signed the MoU in New Delhi. They will develop a minimum agenda programme for proposed interventions in health and disasters, address health needs of vulnerable groups in the communities, align with global policy frameworks and jointly carry out research and innovation towards improving public health in disaster prone regions and vulnerable communities.CHD Group and SEEDS aim to build institutional capacities to address the problems of disasters and also converge efforts in the right directions. Both the organisations have been working with the popular Governments and intend to take the co-operation further. CHD Group; SEEDS sign MoU for building Disaster Resilience in India Share Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19”center_img Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha Related Posts MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” Read Article WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionalslast_img read more

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New entrants boosted in Canadian spectrum auction

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 09 MAR 2015 Tags Telus to raise $1B as Canada 5G battle hots up Home New entrants boosted in Canadian spectrum auction Author Canada’s recently-completed CAD2.11 billion ($1.7 billion) spectrum auction will “lead to more choice, lower prices, and better services for consumers”, after new players emerged as the winning bidders on most of the frequencies, according to government body Industry Canada.The new competitors have increased their spectrum holdings by 107 per cent “on average”. All licences also include a strict “use it or lose it” clause, to ensure frequencies are put to use.Reuters said that the smaller operators paid less than their more established rivals, under a government plan intended to spur competition. Spectrum was set-aside for new entrants, with conditions on the transfer of permits in future.Of the “big three” players, Rogers Communications did not win any new permits. TELUS acquired frequencies in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec, to increase its holdings by 16 per cent, and Bell bought spectrum in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Northern Quebec, Ontario, Nunavut, Northwest Territories and Yukon to increase its allocation by 4 per cent.Of course, the percentage increases depend on the amount of spectrum originally held by the various companies, making it easier for the new entrants to hit the big numbers than the larger players.Telus opened its wallet widest, pledging CAD1.5 billion, followed by Bell at CAD499.9 million – around 95 per cent of the total.WIND acquired spectrum in British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario to increase its holding by 180 per cent; Eastlink acquired spectrum in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Northern Ontario to boost its allocation by 77 per cent; and Videotron bought permits in Quebec and Eastern Ontario, to boost its allocation by 65 per cent.“Spectrum is a vital public resource and it is the government’s responsibility to allocate it in a way that encourages robust competition and choice in the wireless market. The result of the AWS-3 auction supports our government’s policies of delivering more choice, lower prices and better service on the latest technologies,” James Moore, Minister of Industry, said.The Canadian authorities are set to auction more frequencies from April 2015, when bidding begins for 2.5GHz allocations. By summer 2015, the amount of spectrum available for mobile services will have increased by almost 60 per cent since early 2014, including an earlier 700MHz auction. Canada operator chiefs commence defence of takeover Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more BellCanadaEastlinkRegulatoryRogers CommunicationsTelusVideotronWind Previous ArticleVideo: QorvoNext ArticleEurope’s new antitrust chief warns on consolidation — report Steve Costello Related Rogers plots 5G boost with $20B Shaw takeoverlast_img read more

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