Marissa Mayer to resign from Yahoo’s board after Verizon deal closes and Yahoo to change name to Altaba

Marissa Mayer to resign from Yahoo’s board after Verizon deal closes and Yahoo to change name to Altaba whatsapp Shruti Tripathi Other senior executives set to resign from the company include David Filo, Eddy Hartenstein, Richard Hill, Jane Shaw, and Maynard Webb. The filing confirmed the size of the board will be reduced to five directors. Tor Braham, Eric Brandt, Catherine Friedman, Thomas McInerney and Jeffrey Smith will continue to serve as directors of the company following the closing, and Brandt will serve as chairman of the board.Read more: Yahoo hack puts Verizon deal and Marissa Mayer under pressureAll six executives including Mayer said their “intention to resign is not due to any disagreement with the company on any matter relating to the company’s operations, policies or practices”.Mayer joined Yahoo from Google in 2012 and was tasked with turning around the tech titan using her product and engineering expertise. She joined Google in 1999 and was the search giant’s first woman engineer.Her leadership came under the scanner last month when Yahoo disclosed a second major hack attack, twice the size of the previous one it revealed last year, and which experts called the biggest hack in history. Read This Next20 Stars Who’ve Posted Nude Selfies, From Lizzo to John Legend (Photos)The WrapIf You’re Losing Hair in This Specific Spot, It Might Be a Thyroid IssueVegamourTop 5 Tips If You’re Losing Your EyebrowsVegamourMore People Now Use YouTube Than Facebook or Instagram – What Happened?The WrapWhat Causes Hair Loss? Every Trigger ExplainedVegamourSmoking and Hair Loss: Are They Connected?Vegamour’Infinite’ Film Review: Mark Wahlberg Action-Thriller Overspends andThe WrapThis Is How Often You Should Cut Your HairVegamourHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe Wrap Yahoo chief executive Marissa Mayer will step down from the board after the tech giant completes its $4.8bn (£3.9bn) deal with Verizon.The holding company of Yahoo’s core assets will be called Altaba, it was revealed in a filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) late last night.  Share Monday 9 January 2017 11:20 pm whatsapp read more

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Tracing social unrest in ancient Egypt to a volcanic eruption in Alaska

first_imgAlaska’s Energy Desk | Climate ChangeTracing social unrest in ancient Egypt to a volcanic eruption in AlaskaNovember 15, 2017 by Elizabeth Jenkins, Alaska’s Energy Desk – Juneau Share:Scientists don’t know exactly which Alaska volcano contributed to the drought. But Joseph Manning says that information could be available in the future. (Photo courtesy John Lyons/Alaska Volcano Observatory/U.S. Geological Survey)Extreme weather has caused chaos recently in places like Puerto Rico and Texas. But to better understand how humans react to these types of events, one historian is looking at the distant past.Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2017/11/15VOLMP3.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Joseph Manning says if you want to study past climate events, ancient Egypt is a good place to start. The Egyptians kept detailed records. There was everyday bookkeeping on crops, land leases, letters and legal documents, usually written on papyrus. And Manning says a lot of that has survived. “Well, ironically because of the dryness of Egypt but also the fondness for mummification, which is interesting,” Manning said. “So a lot of documents get recycled as mummy wrappings or mummy stuffing sacred animals and human.”As odd as that may seem, some of these old records were found in the body cavities of mummies. But when you look at the documents as a whole, Manning says a story starts to emerge and it’s one that includes Alaska. As a history professor at Yale University, Manning studies the Ptolemaic Period. You probably know it as a time when Cleopatra reigned as queen. But to historians, it’s a period marked by social unrest and revolts. That’s been linked, in part, to changes in the Nile River. The river didn’t flood for two to three years, which meant crops didn’t get vital nutrients and irrigation. “People recall a time in the past when there was widespread famine, and they worried that might happen again,” he said.But he says an important part of the story was missing — what caused the Nile to stop flooding every year?So Manning looked for scientists to compare notes. He remembers a colleague showing him a newly published paper on volcanic eruptions. “I told him the sort of dates I was interested in and they kind of lined up in a spooky sort of way, I would say,” Manning said. “And then we got to work.”Beyond the historical documents, like the mummy wrappings and exact measurements of the Nile, Manning teamed up with scientists to examine what he calls “natural archives.” That is, layers of ice thousands of years of old. Below the surface of the ice is a record of major climatic events. Scientists can pull up core samples and test it for particulates that may have been deposited from a distant volcano. And Manning was able to use that data, comparing volcanic activity with the timeline. “You can tell specific eruptions, you can tell approximately where the eruption is located, and you can tell the size of the eruption which also matters,” he said.What they found was volcanoes in Iceland, Alaska and possibly Russia were erupting around the same time the Nile River was thrown out of whack. Manning says large volcanic eruptions can cause cooling and drought. In the case of the Nile River, the eruption may have caused less rain to fall in Ethiopia so the Nile didn’t flood. That, in turn, set off a chain of tumultuous events, that would have been impossible for ancient Egyptians to comprehend. “Egyptians have no idea there’s a volcano in Alaska,” Manning said.Manning says scientists have posed the volcano theory before. But this kind of approach is a new way of understanding how history and climate are connected. “For the first time you can see a dynamic society,” he said. “It’s like pulling a curtain back and actually seeing a society moving around as opposed to a static picture of an ancient society.”Manning thinks today, as we see weather shifts caused by warming and human activity, we can learn something from the past. The ancient Egyptians can help us understand how environmental change influences behavior and potentially leads to political unrest or war. He says there are skeptics to this approach.Some other historians have pushed back, saying the research is short sighted.“Actually I’ve seen some people say we’re part of a fad,” Manning said. “Climate change is such a fad these days that will pass.”But Manning doesn’t think so. Unlike ancient times, he says we have some control over how things play out. We can reduce carbon emissions and imagine solutions. He wonders what the Egyptians would have done with the same knowledge. Share this story:last_img read more

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The 100 City people you need to follow on Twitter this year, day five: Thought leaders

first_img Friday 9 January 2015 5:30 am On the final day of our list, we’ve gone abstract: having gone through entrepreneurs, analysts, chief executives and economists, our final day provides some food for thought for those looking for a bit of inspiration in their Twitter streams.Whether they’re well-known faces or small-time entrepreneurs; whether they’ve come up with a new way to lead, done a great TED talk, discovered the psychopathic personality makes the ideal leader or just want to help you become a better speaker, here – in no particular order – are our 20 most inspiring City(ish) tweeters. 1.Belinda [email protected] executive, LadygeekCEO of @ladygeek, OBE, Author of The Empathy Era & Little Miss Geek, Professor, Campaigner, World Economic Forum #YGL, UK Gov Advisory Board for STEM2.Geoff [email protected] executive, NestaChief Exec of Nesta, writer, social entrepreneur, policy geek & infinitely curious about how the world works3.Richard [email protected] director-general, CBIConsulting on proposals for a new independent body to raise standards of behaviour and competence in banking. #bankingstandards4.Lord [email protected] chief executive, BPThe official Twitter account of Lord (John) Browne of Madingley. Momento historiae – don’t lose the plot.5.Simon [email protected], Leaders Eat LastTo run & jump & laugh & cry & love & hope & imagine…to experience as much as I can all for one purpose: to inspire. 6.Jamie [email protected] Jamie Oliver.7.Rory [email protected], Ogilvy & MatherFat bloke at Ogilvy, IPA; The Spectator’s Wiki Man.8.Lisa [email protected], digital formingCo-Founder and CEO of Digital Forming, a software house that aims to democratising design for 3D printing technologies. Click to print…9.Chris [email protected], TEDHead of TED. Dreamer. Most days an optimist. TED = free talks on the web in Technology, Entertainment, Design & ideas worth spreading.10.Natalie Camp[email protected], A Very Good Company#Creator-Doer Founder @avgoodcompany and @HowSheMovesUK Author #7SimpleSteps Chair @NCYVS Trustee/Board @UnLtd and @WayraUnLtd Fellow @cloresocial @wcmt_uk11.Tim [email protected]_leeInventor, World Wide WebDirector of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) w3.org, the place to agree on web standards. Founded webfoundation.org – let the web serve humanity12.Trevor [email protected], Clockwork radioClockwork radio inventor. President of Trevor Baylis Brands, inventor service. Ask me about inventions, patents, copyright. Visit http://trevorbaylisbrands.com 13.Paul [email protected], Contagious CommunicationsCo-founder of Contagious Communications; father of three; Boro fan; dweller of St Albans. Loves ripe bananas. Doesn’t get enough sleep.14.Joanna [email protected], Tech City UKBaroness Joanna Shields is Prime Minister @David_Cameron’s Digital Advisor. Also Chair @TechCityUK and Non-Executive Director @LSEGplc.15.Kate [email protected] president, Havas WorldwideCo-Founder One Young World, Global President Havas Worldwide, mum. Passionate about the power of youth, the role of business in doing good & watching sport!16.Dr Tomas [email protected] of business psychology, University College LondonBusiness Psychologist / UCL Professor / VP @HoganAssessment / Conf!dence author / @HarvardBiz @Forbes & @guardian blogger / #leadership #personality #innovation17.Paul [email protected], GandysCo- Founder of Gandys – Orphans for Orphans.18.Professor Kevin [email protected], The Good Psychopath’s Guide to SuccessResearch psychologist at the University of Oxford. Author of the Good Psychopath’s Guide to Success, Wisdom of Psychopaths and Flipnosis. Follow #goodpsychopath19.Peter [email protected] and speaker coachSpeakerCoach. Chief of Staff to a Jack Russel. MessageCraftⓇ – the art and science of Getting What You Want with Words for candidates, careers and corporates.20.Tim [email protected]_mbeFounder, The Bright Ideas TrustKnowledge is power. With connections that power is limitless… @weareams @bright_ideas @nrggym See the rest of this week’s list below – or follow the full 100 as a Twitter list. Disagree with the people we’ve put on the list, or want to suggest others? Let us know in the comments below. Emma Haslett The 100 City people you need to follow on Twitter this year, day five: Thought leaders Show Comments ▼ whatsapp whatsapp Share by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryHero WarsThis game will keep you up all night!Hero WarsMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekThe No Cost Solar ProgramGet Paid To Install Solar + Tesla Battery For No Cost At Install and Save Thousands.The No Cost Solar ProgramFungus EliminatorIf You Have Toenail Fungus Try This TonightFungus EliminatorMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailBeverly Hills MDPlastic Surgeon Explains: “Doing This Every Morning Can Snap Back Sagging Skin” (No Creams Needed)Beverly Hills MDThe Chef PickElisabeth Shue, 57, Sends Fans Wild As She Flaunts Age-Defying FigureThe Chef PickLux & LushAfter 220 Years Two Brothers Finally Found The Oak Island TreasureLux & Lush Tags: Twitterlast_img read more

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News / After its buying spree, MSC is close to overtaking Maersk in the liner league

first_imgMSC Gülsün at Shanghai terminal By Mike Wackett 09/06/2021 As its fleet capacity edges above 4m teu, MSC is on the cusp of overtaking 2M partner Maersk to become the largest carrier.According to Alphaliner, following its aggressive buying spree of secondhand tonnage, the Swiss carrier now controls a fleet of 604 ships for a capacity of 4,015,674 teu, narrowing the gap on Maersk to just 106,000 teu.Moreover, the current market leader has a virtually empty orderbook as it commits its efforts to research and development into alternative fuels.In contrast, with 40 vessels, representing 724,000 teu, under construction, MSC has the largest orderbook of all the container lines.The consultant said it had taken MSC just eight years to double its container fleet. It has expanded by 4% so far this year year.Maersk has reigned at the top of the carrier league table for more than a quarter of a century, but chief executive Soren Skou is apparently unconcerned about being ousted by its 2M partner, and rival.“That’s not the end of the world,” he said at the company’s Capital Markets Day last month.“That’s not how we think about being number one. Our focus is on having a much higher turnover per container we ship,” said Mr Skou.To hear more about the capacity crunch, listen to this clip from The Loadstar Podcast.Your browser does not support the audio element. Or to hear a clip about what actions Maersk is taking to help customers, listen here.Your browser does not support the audio element.last_img read more

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Finally”, UN rights investigators urge after decade of conflict

first_imgFinally”, UN rights investigators urge after decade of conflict The United NationsAlong with an end to the “instrumentalization” of humanitarian aid, victims of Syria’s decade-long civil war and their families need justice to help rebuild their lives, Human Rights Council-appointed investigators said on Thursday.After a decade of chaos that has likely taken hundreds of thousands of lives and displaced millions more, the Commission of Inquiry on Syria said in its latest report that no Syrian family had been left “unscathed”.Pointing out that “cities have been reduced to rubble, and a constellation of armed actors continue to prey on the population”, the Commission attested that more than half of the pre-conflict population has been internally or externally displaced.“The children, women and men of Syria have paid the price as a brutal authoritarian Government unleashed overwhelming violence to quell dissent”, said Commission of Inquiry Chair Paolo Pinheiro.He cited “opportunistic foreign funding, arms and other support to the warring parties” that had “poured fuel on this fire that the world has been content to watch burn”.Put Syrians first In an appeal to “put Syrians first…finally”, Mr Pinheiro led renewed calls for a ceasefire. He also urged the international community to “expend every effort to support a peaceful, negotiated resolution to the conflict and to help place Syria on a path toward a stable, prosperous, and just future for all her people”.Syrians in built-up areas have also suffered “vast aerial and artillery bombardments” and chemical weapons attacks, the investigators explained, along with sieges “leading to starvation and shameful restrictions on humanitarian aid – both cross-line and cross-border, the latter even with the approval of the Security Council“, he said.Basic rights unmet In an appeal for principled and rights-based humanitarian access to be restored without delay, Commissioner Karen Koning AbuZayd said that it was “unconscionable that for 10 years, humanitarian aid has been consistently delayed, denied, and instrumentalised – despite the clear and consistent needs of so many Syrians, as well as Palestinian and other refugees”.People’s basic human rights and humanitarian needs had been ignored, she continued: “food, water, health care, and education must be met, regardless of which group controls a given territory”.Targeting healthcare The Commissioner also warned that COVID-19 infections were already “overwhelming” the remaining medical staff and frontline workers in the country, where hospitals and health centres have been “vastly diminished” by “deliberate targeting…and the flight of medical workers”.Highlighting the need for justice for the victims of the war, the investigators noted that more than 60 probes had begun outside Syria, mainly in Europe, reinforced by the Commission’s nearly 8,000 interviews and information on over 3,200 alleged individual perpetrators.“The time is long overdue for further initiatives in additional areas of justice and recent history has shown that inaction at the UN Security Council need not prevent action on other fronts,” he said.In addition to welcoming these developments, Commissioner Hanny Megally insisted that progress was also needed for Syrian families whose relatives had been detained, often disappearing without a trace.“The restorative justice measures that Syrians have called for time and again – on the missing, the disappeared, the arbitrarily detained, on support to families, the demobilisation of child fighters, the provision of holistic psychosocial support, in particular for children and victims of sexual and gender-based violence, and the preservation and restoration of vital civil documentation, among other issues – cannot be left till after the conflict ends”, the Commissioner upheld. /UN News Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:civil war, Commission, Commissioner, education, Europe, frontline workers, Government, healthcare, Human Rights, Humanitarian, Palestinian, resolution, Security Council, Starvation, Syria, UNlast_img read more

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Bench-to-boardroom scientists key to seize future

first_imgBench-to-boardroom scientists key to seize future Australia’s governments, industry, and research community have a legacy-defining opportunity to seize the future by boosting research commercialisation with a new breed of ‘bench-to-boardroom scientists’.In its submission to the Government’s University Research Commercialisation consultation, Science & Technology Australia says Australia can and must do more to commercialise world-leading research more consistently and at a far greater scale.But to get there will require strategic investment and developing the specialised skills to train more Australian researchers to be ‘bench-to-boardroom scientists’ and ‘connectors of commercialisation’.Up to 2000 top researchers Australia-wide should be trained for specialist roles to propel the translation of promising technologies and become linchpins liaising between industry and university research.“Turning more of Australia’s ‘nearly there’ research into ‘really there’ products and services would generate vast economic and social benefits for the country from a relatively modest public investment,” said Science & Technology Australia Chief Executive Officer Misha Schubert.“If we create a culture of closer engagement, greater sovereign capability, and even a handful of billion-dollar Australian grown and owned start-ups, we can powerfully shift the dial on research commercialisation.”“This has the potential to generate significant new jobs growth and whole new industries in our economy.”Past attempts to invigorate commercialisation have looked at industry and research as two different entities to be forced together, with limited success.“A more successful approach is the concept of ‘baton passing’ research along the stages to commercialisation – an idea recently put forward by Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Cathy Foley,” said Ms Schubert.“The key to achieving that would be to train scores of bench-to-boardroom scientists as the connectors of commercialisation – the people that can bridge the so-called ‘valley of death’ between blue sky research and industry.”“We don’t need every researcher to become a commercialisation expert. We should focus instead on equipping up to 2000 leading researchers with the specialist skills and remit to champion the translation of technologies.”“They would be a small proportion of the research workforce with the potential for vast social and economic impact.”“This will require cultural change in our universities towards researchers. The nature of innovation is that some failure is inevitable, so we need the researchers supported and able to ‘fail fast’ and move on, just as they need to be applauded for success.”The submission also details the changes needed to researcher incentives to ensure they are able to move between research and industry without penalty.It additionally argues for industry to have a single point of entry through a lead researcher and projects to have strong autonomy from the universities that may house them. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Australian, autonomy, community, culture, Government, industry, innovation, Investment, research, research commercialisation, science, Science & Technology Australia, Scientists, technology, university, workforcelast_img read more

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Koepka doesn’t win, but he’s not going away

first_imgPEBBLE BEACH, Calif. – As his 9-foot birdie putt on the final green momentarily crept toward the hole before slipping past the right edge, Brooks Koepka doubled over. Finally, the man who has built a legend by conquering one major after the next bared his mortality for all to see. The U.S. Open trophy, in his possession for the last 24 months, was heading for a new home. But while Koepka’s bid for three straight wins and a piece of sporting lore came up three shots short, the effort he put forth was nothing short of valiant. “He’s like a cockroach,” said Xander Schauffele. “He just won’t go away.” Koepka certainly didn’t go away Sunday at Pebble Beach, methodically stalking the leaders like a shark might take to a school of fish in the waters off the eighth fairway. Facing a four-shot deficit heading into the final round, Koepka had two stated goals: get off to a hot start on the easiest section of the course, and get within three of the lead when he made the turn. At that point, he’d take his chances. He ticked off both of those boxes, rolling in birdies on four of his first five holes around a brilliant par save at No. 2 where it seemed for a moment like bogey might be something of a small victory. The Koepka Express was running full speed ahead as he trudged up the hill toward the sixth green, with the galleries buzzing at the prospect of history in the making. Your browser does not support iframes. U.S. Open: Full-field scores | Full coverage “It kind of felt like, all right, man, we’ve got a ballgame now,” Koepka said. “It was fun. Some excitement around the golf course, and that’s what you want.” Though he fell short of the three-peat, the legend of Koepka’s recent run in majors continues to grow. He has alternated wins and runner-up finishes over the last four events, defeating hundreds of potential foes while looking up at just two names on the scoreboard: Woodland on Sunday and Tiger Woods at the Masters. “He’s definitely found the recipe to make himself perform at the big ones,” said Adam Scott. “Of course, not everyone does that and it’s very hard to consistently play this well. But he mustn’t be changing too much, because he’s running with it.” Others have had a shot at three U.S. Opens in a row, the last being Curtis Strange in 1990. But none went out while flashing the level of bravado with which Koepka played his final hole, lashing a 3-iron that sailed across Stillwater Cove and nearly toppled the flagstick on the fly. When he looks back on what might have been, Koepka will likely rue some errant tee shots down the stretch that limited his ability to create scoring chances on some of Pebble’s most demanding holes. His birdie on No. 11, the one that brought him within a shot of Woodland’s lead, proved to be his last of the week. Even that 9-footer on 18 became a footnote once Woodland buried a lengthy putt of his own, turning a tense finish into a three-shot margin of victory. And while Koepka was in the unfamiliar position of talking to media as another player prepared to put his hands on a major trophy, there was no sense of regret or disappointment. He had shot his proverbial shot, devised a game plan and stuck to it. Each swing was executed as well as he’d hoped, even the ones where the results didn’t live up to expectation. Koepka is a big-game hunter, and he has an equal appreciation for the fact that sometimes you just get beat on the big stage. Your browser does not support iframes. “You kind of realize, wow, I was just that close to accomplishing something that hasn’t been done in over 110 years. And that’s special,” Koepka said. “Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to get it done, but I mean, I don’t think anybody in the world played as good as Gary did this weekend. It was cool to see.” Koepka’s matter-of-fact dissection of the prospects for the rest of the field at Bethpage drew some quizzical looks, up until the moment he grabbed the tournament by the throat en route to a wire-to-wire PGA Championship repeat victory. That same clinical approach brought him to the cusp of a historical achievement Sunday, but it also helped to keep any sense of bittersweet disappointment at bay. Sure, four major trophies help cushion the blow when the quest for a fifth comes up short. But this is more about a man honing an incredibly productive approach, all while realizing that it may sometimes produce runner-up medals instead of victory speeches. “Seeing Brooks Koepka do it today, he was trying to three-peat, all the pressure on him. He’s playing like he plays on Tuesday,” said Sunday playing competitor Chez Reavie. “I played with him Monday here, and he played exactly the same as Monday. There’s zero difference, no matter the stage, no matter what the situation.” Earlier in the week, Koepka lamented the fact that he was hitting it “horrible” during early-week practice. A pedestrian showing last week in Canada hadn’t garnered much momentum, and he had found it difficult to get the crisp, driving contact he sought while banging balls on the Pebble Beach range. So instead he sought to hone his swing during his actual competitive rounds, treating his first two trips around the course as an opportunity to “find (his) game.” The ascent of his name up the leaderboards was merely a welcome byproduct of those efforts. It was with the same relative nonchalance that he swept away the three-peat that wasn’t, knowing full well that it won’t be long before he has another chance to contend for some more major glory. The three-peat bid may be dead, but the game’s current alpha isn’t going anywhere. “It’s awesome to come this close to three in a row. It’s incredible. Anytime you can compete in a major is special, and to have a chance to go back-to-back-to-back, that was pretty cool,” Koepka said. “Just wasn’t meant to be this week.”last_img read more

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Comment / When should importers start shipping for Christmas shopping?

first_img By Gavin van Marle 21/09/2018 While there is a rush to load cargo at Asian export ports for the month-long sailing to North European destinations, continuing hinterland supply chains issues mean the optimal sailing date from Asia has been pushed forward this year – although many companies will have failed to spot this.Common wisdom has it that China’s Golden Week holiday is the effective cut-off – when the entire country goes on holiday from 1 to 7 October.Although the factories re-open afterwards and there are still three weeks until the nominal end-of-October cut-off point, Golden Week appears to mark the end of the peak season, and carriers have already announced a slew of blank sailings to follow it as demand for container transport is expected to fall dramatically.Thus, if you are hoping to load cargo after 7 October for goods to arrive in time for Christmas, you are hoping probably in vain.But wait. There is also the mid-autumn holiday, shortly before Golden Week. This year it takes 22-24 September, (yep, tomorrow and over the weekend) – which will prove a further hiatus for supply chains.And that is because of what is happening at the receiving end. The driver shortage crisis, years in the making, is now really hitting home – even the largest shippers which operate their own haulage fleets are reporting capacity issues, so it is unsurprising that the much-maligned container haulage sector is having even greater problems.Compared with the stable pay, guaranteed holidays and pension payments that come with driving for a supermarket or the likes of DHL and Wincanton, with predictable routes, a sub-contracted container haulier moving – or more often stuck in a queue of trucks – between ports and inland depots, pretty much has the worst of it: low pay; traffic jams; and angry customers.Is it any wonder resources are thinning? Photo 9122449 © Wojciechbeczynski – Dreamstime.comcenter_img There comes a point in every peak season when western importers, especially retailers desperate to get their goods onto the shelves to catch the Christmas shopping frenzy, have to ask themselves: “When, exactly, is the last boat from China?”Let’s work backwards. To make it for Christmas, goods need to be at point of sale by mid-December at the latest. A container supply chain would commonly require around a week for a box to be moved from arrival port to an inland distribution centre where it is unstuffed and the goods forwarded. Given the four-to-five week sailing time from Asia to North Europe, the last boat from China is effectively the end of October.Easy, right?For importers in Europe and the UK, that final sailing is approaching with alarming speed; in the UK, continuing problems with port congestion have melded with worsening haulage capacity issues to create a sort of super-strength peak season alloy, upon which the most carefully designed supply chain could shatter.last_img read more

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News / ‘Ignore India at your peril’ – now the world has to compete with us’

first_imgBy Alex Lennane 02/03/2020 It was an increasingly – and justifiably – confident India on show at Air Cargo India last week in Mumbai.India has long been full of potential; that is now being realised.The new pharma centre at Mumbai Airport, said to be the world’s largest airport temperature-controlled facility and which opened last month, is a case in point. The Cargo Service Center (CSC)-operated facility, which took some four years to build, offers state-of-the-art facilities for export cargo. It is the first airport in the country, and the third in Asia to obtain IATA’s CEIV Pharma accreditation. The Export Cold Zone has 12 truck docks, for pharma and agro-cargo, two floors, freezer chambers, cold rooms, 80 pallet positions and handling capacity for 600 tons of pharma a day  – which certainly appeared to be the case on a very busy Thursday last week.The perishables centre was stacked with Indian vegetables – turmeric root, yams, beans – proof, if any was required, that India has invested in its infrastructure and sees exports as a critical economic pillar.As Tushar Jani, chairman of CSC said when the facility opened: “We have created a world-class facility and now the time has come when the world has to compete with India.“India is moving towards capturing a significant share of global generic drug market from the current 20% market share in terms of value. Pharma Excellence Center will play a vital role in this stride, it is a temple where professionals of pharma companies like Sun Pharma, Lupin, Glenmark can brainstorm on innovative ideas and contribute in achieving excellence in the pharma handling processes.”The change in Indian confidence was palpable, but delegates, talking to The Loadstar on the sidelines of the event, said there was no desire to become the next China.“We are also a service economy,” said one, “and the English language sets us apart from the Chinese. We also have technology and innovation – we are not the ‘world’s factory’.”But India’s share of global trade is only 1.7%, explained another delegate, “so there’s lots that needs to be done.”Burgeoning exports have led the government and corporate world to focus on logistics infrastructure, such as the new pharma centre. Alongside the five-year air cargo implementation plan, is another to develop India’s airports – 16 greenfield sites are in development.“A lot is happening,” said Vandana Aggarwal, economic adviser to India’s ministry of civil aviation, who noted the success of Chennai’s air freight station.“We have a middle-class population of 450m; the production is there, the demand is there – it’s just the logistics that needs to catch up.”Richard Theknath, managing director at forwarder Jet Freight agreed there was work to do.“Without help from the government, and a macrolevel level view, we won’t progress. There is new technology we can bring into India. But it’s not quite happening at the moment. It’s not the air freight, it’s not the handling, it’s something else.”While there are still challenges to overcome, confidence in India is soaring, a result of government support for business, said delegates.“In India, business was seen as something bad, wrong,” said Sujan Roy, head of international business, passenger vehicles, at Tata Motors. “That mindset has changed, and as India becomes more confident our engagement will increase. It’s a much more confident country, like China was 10 years ago.“There are so many opportunities. Ignore India at your peril.”last_img read more

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News / Typhoons add to troubles for Asian ports already suffering congestion

first_img Back-to-back typhoons and surging shipping demand have meant lengthy vessel delays for ocean freight out of Asia.According to Resilience360, Typhoon Haishen made landfall south-east of Gangneung in South Korea on 7 September, following Typhoon Maysak, which struck near the port of Busan on 3 September with winds of 100 mph.“Supply chains in east Asia are still facing impacts ranging from congested ports to closed production plants,” Resilience360 said.“Due to the short interval between the typhoons, ports have been unable to reduce backlogs at container terminals and closures forced by Typhoon Haishen will further add to the congestion.” The ports of Busan and Gwangyang have experienced five days of waiting times for incoming vessels, Resilience360 noted, while in China, Shanghai and Ningbo are also dealing with congestion issues.“Shipping lines reported waiting times of 36-48 hours at terminals in Shanghai and 24-48 hours in Ningbo, ahead of Typhoon Haishen last weekend. Both ports were closed for at least 24 hours on September 6 and 7, likely worsening congestion levels as well,” it added.Surging demand for ocean freight space out of China, ahead of October’s Golden Week holiday, is creating delays, too, both in China and South-east Asia.“We’ve seen vessel delays in Shanghai, Qingdao, and also Cat Lai in Ho Chi Minh City,” explained Peter Sundara, head of ocean Asia Pacific regions at Scan Global Logistics. “There’s been a huge pick-up in volumes, especially for Asia-Europe and transpacific trades.”He said the surge in cargo was driven by demand to replenish depleted inventory, Christmas orders and the cargo rush ahead of Golden Week.Furthermore, Mr Sundara noted, intra-Asia volumes had also been strong, which was adding to “vessel bunching” in the major ports in China and Vietnam.“There’s congestion in the Philippines too,” he added. “While it’s not uncommon to have port congestion in Manila, there are laden containers still lying in terminals there, which have not been collected by consignees.“We are also facing an equipment shortage, especially for 40ft boxes in China and Vietnam.” By Sam Whelan 10/09/2020last_img read more

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