Hospitality: A quarter of Britain’s pubs and restaurants still to reopen

first_img whatsapp whatsapp (Getty Images) Also Read: Hospitality: A quarter of Britain’s pubs and restaurants still to reopen after lockdown Show Comments ▼ One in four of Britain’s restaurants, pubs, bars and other licensed premises have yet to reopen despite the return of inside service. “It will be an anxious wait to see how many of the venues that are holding on until the final easing of restrictions will be able to make it through,” he added. “It is alarming to see that so many venues have still not been able to welcome guests. Many will have decided that restrictions and space constraints make opening unviable, while some sectors like late-night bars and nightclubs are still completely off limits,” said Karl Chessell, CGA’s director for hospitality operators and food. Michiel Willems (Getty Images) Hospitality: A quarter of Britain’s pubs and restaurants still to reopen after lockdown CGA and AlixPartners also found that more than 8,500 premises, 7.4 per cent of Britain’s pre-Covid-19 total, have closed for good. Share Tags: Coronavirus Social distancing and restrictions in place still make it unviable for swathes of venues to open, and 45.2 per cent of Britain’s sports and social clubs remain closed, alongside 50.9 per cent of large venues and 27 per cent of bars, according to the figures. Monday 31 May 2021 12:15 pm Social distancing and restrictions The data shows similar trading numbers in England (76.6 per cent) and Scotland (77.4 per cent), with a notably slower return in Wales (69.6 per cent), with slightly more pubs having reopened than restaurants. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeNational Penny For Seniors7 Discounts Seniors Only Get If They AskNational Penny For SeniorsDaily Funny40 Brilliant Life Hacks Nobody Told You AboutDaily FunnyDrivepedia30+ Funny Photos Of Car Owners Having A Rough DayDrivepediaAll Things Auto | Search AdsNew Cadillac’s Finally On SaleAll Things Auto | Search AdsBrake For ItSay Goodbye: These Cars Will Be Discontinued In 2021Brake For ItLuxury SUVs | Search AdsThese Cars Are So Loaded It’s Hard to Believe They’re So CheapLuxury SUVs | Search AdsMoneyWise.comMechanics Say You Should Avoid These Cars In 2021  MoneyWise.comLivestlyPlugs Have These Two Holes At The End, Here’s WhyLivestlyThe Wallet Watcher7 Discounts Seniors Get Only If They AskThe Wallet Watcher (Getty Images) Also Read: Hospitality: A quarter of Britain’s pubs and restaurants still to reopen after lockdown Around 25,000 venues across Britain are still shut, according to new hospitality data from CGA and AlixPartners, shared with City A.M. this morning. last_img read more

Read More →

People / Guillaume Halleux becomes acting head of Qatar Airways Cargo

first_img Guillaume Halleux has stepped up to become acting chief officer for cargo at Qatar Airways following the resignation of Ulrich Ogiermann.While no official statement has been released, the carrier referenced Mr Halleux’s new title during the announcement of a freighter service from Doha to Yangon.Prior to Mr Ogiermann’s decision to leave Qatar – which he said was for family reasons – Mr Halleux had served as vice president of cargo for Asia-Pacific, having only joined the carrier last year.The carrier did not respond to questions from The Loadstar as to whether he is being looked at as a candidate for the position in the longer term. By Alex Lennane 20/11/2017 However, he will have big shoes to fill if he is to take on the role, his predecessor having propelled Qatar into the top tier of cargo carriers.Mr Ogiermann took on the cargo chief role at Qatar in 2012, surviving considerably longer than many European executives.The airline announced in 2013 it wanted to be among the top five cargo players by 2018 – under Mr Ogiermann, it became number three, measured in IATA freight tonne km, in 2015.During his tenure, nearly 20 freighters have been delivered to the airline, and growth has been phenomenal.Mr Halleux started his logistics career with Air France in 1997 as a purchaser, before moving over to the French flag-carrier’s cargo division in 1999.In 2006, he left the carrier to work for Sky Team before returning to the now AF-KLM in 2009 as director for operations in Hong Kong and South China.He again upped sticks in 2012 to join Bollore Logistics working in sales and business development for both the Vietnam and Singapore offices.last_img read more

Read More →

After controversy over industry funding, NIH halts enrollment in moderate drinking study

first_imgPolitics What is it? @DrewQJoseph Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. [email protected] Log In | Learn More By Andrew Joseph May 17, 2018 Reprints Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.center_img The National Institutes of Health has suspended enrollment in a study aimed at investigating whether moderate alcohol consumption helps cardiovascular health following concerns over the alcoholic beverage industry’s role in the study.In testimony before a Senate subcommittee Thursday, NIH Director Francis Collins said that enrollment had been halted a week ago as officials investigate how the funding for the study was raised and if the study is still worth pursuing. General Assignment Reporter Andrew covers a range of topics, from addiction to public health to genetics. After controversy over industry funding, NIH halts enrollment in moderate drinking study Andrew Joseph About the Author Reprints What’s included? GET STARTED Tags government agenciesresearchlast_img read more

Read More →

‘The trend is irreversible’: How Covid-19 could drive a shift toward decentralized trials

first_img Log In | Learn More GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Adobe @caseymross By Casey Ross Nov. 25, 2020 Reprints National Technology Correspondent Casey covers the use of artificial intelligence in medicine and its underlying questions of safety, fairness, and privacy. He is the co-author of the newsletter STAT Health Tech. Casey Ross Health Tech What’s included?center_img ‘The trend is irreversible’: How Covid-19 could drive a shift toward decentralized trials STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. About the Author Reprints Covid-19 started as a disaster for clinical research, halting or delaying 3 of every 4 trials worldwide. But in the months since, it has also become a showcase for decentralized research that uses telemedicine and mobile technologies to accelerate the pace of discovery — and potentially cut its costs.Clinical investigators have been forced to modernize their approaches out of necessity, incorporating digital tools to help recruit participants, monitor them remotely, and analyze data using artificial intelligence. [email protected] Unlock this article — and get additional analysis of the technologies disrupting health care — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Tags clinical trialsdrug developmentSTAT+ What is it?last_img read more

Read More →

DEO puts prison holds on some recipients despite users not being behind bars

first_imgAdvertisementHe didn’t want to identify himself for fear it could make things worse although he had never spent time in jail.“It’s frustrating to think I’m being treated like a criminal when I’m not a criminal,” the man said.He said he believed it was yet another glitch affecting the DEO. AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments AdvertisementTags: DEOunemployment Advertisement Over 1,000 unemployment claim call takers let go as DEO cancels contract June 12, 2021 It’s a glitch also affecting Jessica Perdue who has tried to get it removed.“Sometimes I want to cry at night time because it gets to me big time,” Perdue said.She too is accused of collecting unemployment behind bars. Although far from it as she pointed to her newborn child at her side.She admits though she did go to jail for a night in back in 2018.However, Unemployment Advocate Vanessa Brito said that doesn’t matter.  She pointed out that legally prior incarceration does not prevent someone from collecting unemployment.“As long as they were not collecting unemployment when they were incarcerated that’s the end game,” Brito said.Brito believes thousands have been affected and many have reached out to her for help.“These are people’s lives and benefits,” she said.The DEO however did not explain how they’re attempting to correct these matters.So what caused this? The DEO was plagued with fraud back in January.  In an effort to crack down on some of it they put a mechanism in place that blocked thousands of people it shouldn’t have.In order to break free from the lock each case must be looked at manually which could take time.If you have an incarceration hold on your DEO account here is a list of people you can email individually. They work with DEO and they can help: Job seekers turn to employment centers as unemployment benefits run out June 2, 2021 Advertisement RELATEDTOPICS Florida DEO cancels contract with Titan Technologies June 10, 2021 FLORIDA – Incarceration holds are being placed on thousands of unemployment benefit accounts even though the account owners were never behind bars.Basically, the Florida DEO is accusing people of trying to collect money behind bars. That’s the only way someone is barred from collecting.Even if a person has been jailed in the past they’re still entitled to unemployment.One man said he was thrown off when he tried to log onto his account and saw that there was an incarceration hold placed on it. AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments DEO investigates claims of hacking and stealing unemployment benefits June 15, 2021last_img read more

Read More →

South Proposes Discussion on FMD Assistance

first_imgNews There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest By Daily NK – 2014.02.25 11:52am AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] South Proposes Discussion on FMD Assistance News SHARE News center_img The South Korean government has proposed working-level inter-Koreantalks to help combat an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) that has broken out inNorth Korea. If North Korea agrees, the government is set to provide aid in theform of antiseptics and vaccinations. North Korea reported the outbreak to the World Organization for Animal Health on February 19th, saying that the disease had been found in Pyongyang and North Hwanghae Province in mid-January. The South Korean government received word of the outbreak the following day. A Ministry of Unification official explained to reportersyesterday that South Korean officials hope to meet their North Korean counterparts so as to establish precisely whatequipment and medical assistance is needed. The Ministry of Unification issued a notification of the proposal to the chair of North Korea’s NationalDisease Prevention Committee in the name of South Korea’s Animal and PlantQuarantine Agency. Notably, the Ministry official denied any link between the plan for aid and assistance andongoing separated family reunions, saying, “We paid no attention to [thereunions]; the government made this proposal on a purely humanitarian basis.” During another outbreak of the disease in March 2007, theSouth Korean government provided extensive aid in the form of medicines andequipment, and South Korean technicians visited North Korea to help with preventativemeasures. Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following “paratyphoid” outbreak North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China News Facebook Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

Read More →

LOGiQ names Joe Oliver, Colleen McMorrow to its board

first_img “We are extremely pleased to be welcoming Colleen McMorrow and Joe Oliver to the board of directors,” says Dr. Eldon Smith, LOGiQ’s chairman of the board, in a statement. “They bring with them a wealth of financial and capital markets experience that enhances the bench strength of the board.” Oliver also served as the minister of natural resources and the minister responsible for the Greater Toronto Area over the course of his public-service career. In his capacity as former finance minister, Oliver represented Canada’s economic interests at global summits, including the G7, G20, IMF and World Bank meetings. Before his career as a civil servant, Oliver served as president and CEO of the Investment Dealers Association of Canada and executive director of the Ontario Securities Commission. Oliver was also the founding president of the Mutual Fund Dealers Association and holds a seat on the board of several think tanks and public companies. McMorrow, who recently retired, had a lengthy, 38-year career at EY, at which she held numerous senior-management positions. She holds a seat in various boards, serving as a director for non-profit organizations such as the Wellspring Cancer Support Foundation, Plan International Canada and NEXT Canada. In 2015, McMorrow was named Women Executive Network’s (WXN) Top 100 Most Powerful Women in Canada, Trailblazer and Trendsetter. Photo copyright: archman/123RF Beatrice Paez Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Wealth-management veteran joins Morneau Sheppell board CFA Society Toronto names chairwoman FPSC makes changes to its board of directors Keywords Corporate directorsCompanies LOGiQ Asset Management Inc. Kroner and Clark join AIMCo board Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Former federal finance minister Joe Oliver and Colleen McMorrow, formerly of Ernst & Young LLP (EY) have joined Toronto-based LOGiQ Asset Management Inc.’s board of directors. last_img read more

Read More →

Sweeping U.S. tax plan faces widespread doubts

first_img U.S. economy grew at strong 3.2% rate in Q1 2019 Related news It’s a once-in-a-generation opportunity to fix a tax code that stifles business investment, keeps trillions in corporate profits languishing overseas and slows the American economy. So argue Republicans in the U.S. Congress, who hail their tax overhaul as an economic tonic that will deliver benefits to ordinary Americans well into the future. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Associated Press Higher gas costs led to increase in U.S. consumer prices in Marchcenter_img U.S. inflation subdued in April Democrats and most nonpartisan analysts see things rather differently — and they point to history to argue their case. They see the tax plan as an ill-conceived bill that will further enrich the wealthy and swell the government’s debts by at least US$1 trillion in the next decade. Previous tax cuts, they note, have done little to boost hiring, raise wages or accelerate economic growth. Either way, U.S. President Donald Trump is prepared to sign the measure into law this week, to take effect in 2018, after the House and Senate each passed it Wednesday. The bill — approved without a single Democratic vote in Congress —will mark the most far-reaching rewrite of tax law since 1986. Over the weekend, Trump spoke expansively about the economic bounty he said the bill would unleash. Noting that the American economy grew at an annual rate of at least 3% in each of the past two quarters, Trump predicted that “we could go to 4, 5, or even 6%, ultimately … We are really going to start to rock.” The administration’s official forecasts are more restrained. The Treasury Department and the White House budget office predict that the tax bill and other policy steps will support average annual growth of 2.9% from 2018-2027. That estimate adds about 1 percentage point to the average annual growth the Congressional Budget Office had forecast before any policy changes. Nonpartisan observers expect the bill to deliver far less. The University of Pennsylvania’s Penn Wharton Budget Model says it will increase growth by no more than 0.12 percentage point a year from 2018 to 2027— and swell the federal debt by at least US$1.9 trillion in that time. The plan is nothing if not ambitious. It permanently slashes the corporate tax rate to 21% from 35%. It imposes a low one-time tax on companies’ overseas earnings, nudging them to return money they’ve stashed abroad. It provides a windfall to people who pay the personal tax on business earnings. It will narrow and eventually end the tax on wealthy estates. And it will slash individual tax rates — but allow those cuts to expire in 2026. The plan reflects the economic philosophy that has dominated the Republican Party since the presidency of Ronald Reagan in the 1980s: That cutting taxes and regulations and shrinking government will spur businesses to invest — in factories, equipment, software, people — and thereby energize the American economy. The benefits of a tax windfall to corporations and the wealthy will trickle down, in time, to ordinary Americans. Kevin Hassett, chairman of Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers, has asserted that the corporate tax cuts alone will end up swelling the average household’s income by at least US$4,000 a year. And Republicans say the economy could use a lift. Its growth from 2010 to 2016 has clocked in at annual average pace of 2.1% a year, unimpressive compared with the 3.2% average growth from 1948 through 2016. Like European countries and Japan, the U.S. economy has been slowed by a slump in worker productivity. Productivity — worker output per hour — slogged ahead at an average annual rate of just 0.6% from 2011 to 2016, a fraction of the post-World War II average of 2.1%. The more productive workers are, the more employers can afford to pay them. So productivity gains are vital to rising wages and living standards. One way companies can make workers more productive is to invest in technology to make them more efficient. But in the 8 1/2 years since the Great Recession officially ended, businesses have been slower to invest than they were during previous long expansions. The Republican tax plan, its architects say, could accelerate such investment. Besides slashing corporate tax rates, the bill lets companies immediately write off the full cost of new equipment. “It would be good in the short term,” said Sung Won Sohn, economics professor at California State University, Channel Islands. “Corporate cash flow would improve, helping investments. Businesses would be spending money and then hiring people.” But economists caution that the gains will likely be modest in the long run. Companies already hold nearly US$2.4 trillion in cash. And they can still borrow at historically low rates. So if they want to invest more, they can already do so. “It’s not like they’re dying for extra cash,” says Joseph Song, senior economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Some smaller companies might invest some portion of their tax windfall. But large companies make their capital spending plans years in advance and aren’t likely to make major changes, Song says. What’s more, most previous tax cuts have produced minimal economic gains. Wages actually fell, for example, after corporate rates were cut in the 1986 tax reform plan. And a one-time cut in the tax on overseas corporate profits in 2004 did little to boost investment or hiring. Then there’s the timing of the 2017 tax plan. The economy is nearly nine years into its recovery. Significant gains at this point would be unusual. The unemployment rate has reached a 17-year low of 4.1%. “Adding additional stimulus at this point, you run the risk of running the economy a little too hot,” Song said. Song predicts that the tax plan will provide a brief “sugar high,” lifting growth by 0.3 percentage point each in 2018 and 2019. But he then sees the effects wearing off. The Federal Reserve, which has already raised rates three times this year, would likely offset a stimulus from the tax plan by raising rates more aggressively to keep the economy from overheating. Higher deficits would also tend to raise borrowing rates, thereby slowing growth. “The deficit-financed tax cuts are particularly ill-timed,” Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, wrote in a report this week. “They will quickly juice-up economic growth, but in a fully employed economy this will result in wage and price pressures and higher interest rates. Keywords Cross-border financial planning,  United States Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Read More →

St. Andrew Home for Girls to be Refurbished

first_imgRelatedSt. Andrew Home for Girls to be Refurbished FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The London Region of the Jamaican Diaspora in the United Kingdom (UK), in partnership with the Association of Jamaicans (UK) Trust, has undertaken a project to improve conditions at the St. Andrew Home for Girls in Jamaica.The project will be executed by the Jamaican Diaspora Youth Association, and will focus on a number of short and long term goals.Regional Co-ordinator, Celia Grandison Markey, said the short term goals are expected to be completed by August 2009, at a cost of approximately RelatedSt. Andrew Home for Girls to be Refurbished RelatedSt. Andrew Home for Girls to be Refurbishedcenter_img St. Andrew Home for Girls to be Refurbished UncategorizedSeptember 19, 2008 Advertisementslast_img

Read More →

Positive outlook for NSW dairy industry after challenging years

first_imgPositive outlook for NSW dairy industry after challenging years Profitability in the NSW dairy industry has rebounded in the past financial year following years of drought according to the Dairy Farm Monitor Project run by NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI).DPI Dairy Development Officer Sheena Carter met with dairy farmers on the South Coast recently to discuss the ongoing project, which is now in its ninth year and reported performance of 35 farms across the state.“Despite a tough first half of the year for our NSW dairy farmers who have felt the impacts of the ongoing drought, water shortages and devastating bushfires, the project has shown a pleasing improvement in farm profitability,” Ms Carter said.“While profits were mixed across the state, average earnings before interest and tax almost triple compared with the 2018-19 financial year, for the 35 farms monitored.”This translated into a Return on Total Assets managed of 2.7%, up from 0.7% in 2018-19, boosting farm incomes, however Ms Carter cautioned that results within the project and across the industry were still very mixed.“Average net farm income after accounting for interest and lease costs increased to $162,689, whereas the average result in 2018-19 was a loss of more than $30,000,” Ms Carter said.“However, not every farm in the project was able to achieve an operating profit, which reflects the experience in the wider industry.”“Challenges of persistent widespread drought and reduced irrigation meant that in most areas it was difficult to grow homegrown feed and so we saw an increase in the amount and cost of purchased feed, the highest in the nine years of the project.“Fortunately, the NSW Government’s drought support payments helped cushion the impact of high fodder prices for many producers, and strong processor competition for milk saw the average milk price increase by 14.7 per cent to $8.88 per kg of milk solids.“That meant most businesses were able to achieve a good operating profit despite having to rely on high purchased feed prices.”Widespread rainfall events in autumn and early winter across most dairying regions, particularly in the north of the state, also gave farmers the confidence to sow and renovate pastures and the opportunity to make silage in some areas.“The industry is positive about the future, with 94 per cent of farmers in the project indicating they expect their profitability to improve or remain stable, and all farmers anticipated milk production will remain stable or improve,” Ms Carter said.“The major challenge dairy farmers have identified over the next five years is seasonal conditions which is not surprising given the challenging period the agricultural sector has been through recently.”The NSW Dairy Farm Monitor project reports on farm-level data to give an indication to industry and farmers on the financial and physical performance trends over time in NSW. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:bushfires, dairy, drought, future, Government, Impact, industry, Loss, New South Wales, NSW, NSW Department of Primary Industries, production, profit, project, tax, Waterlast_img read more

Read More →