La Liga opens possibility to possible ERTEs in Spanish football

first_img CET That does not mean the money won’t be made up in the case that the game resumes and the season is eventually completed.  La Liga say they will support any measures taken by Spanish clubs, including temporary redundancies (ERTE), as clubs attempt to minimise the financial effects of the coronavirus crisis.  Ramón Fuentes The league have told first and second division clubs that any decision they make in terms of cutting back costs, changing structures and making temporary cutbacks will be backed.  Upd. at 15:55 LaLiga abre sus puertas a los clubes a poder hacer ERTEScenter_img 23/03/2020 IN SPORT.ES SPORT revealed last week that Barcelona are currently looking at ways to save money. Clubs are looking at ERTEs and wage cuts as they fight against the money they are set to lose with no football. First team players across Spain’s top-flight clubs could see their salaries drop.  As revealed in SPORT on Monday, La Liga is thinking that competition could restart some time in May and be finished by the end of June — or later, in July, if UEFA and FIFA allow it.  A meeting is planned on Tuesday between La Liga and the Players’ Association (AFE). Analysis and debates on what comes next, especially in terms of ERTEs, will take place.last_img read more

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SFX bags coveted stage comp.

first_imgBy Kyra Gillespie St Francis Xavier (SFX) College has come out on top in the Premier Division of the 2017…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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Chill with hoops during Spring Break

first_imgNelson Youth Basketball is hosting a hoop camp March 19-21 at the L.V. Rogers Gymnasium.The Kootenay Chill Spring Break Basketball Camp is open to players from Grades 5 to 11. Headlining the camp is European Professional player and former LVR Grad Sean Denison. After playing NCAA Division One for Santa Clara Broncos, Denison has spent the past decade overseas playing in Europe.Joining Denison is Kari Jackson, three-time CIS QUA Allstar with University of Windsor Lancers; Chase Rickaby, who toiled with Mount Royal Cougars and Matthew Fuhr, playing two seasons with SAIT Trojans of the Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference.Junior Skills Camp, for Grades 5-8, runs from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The Senior Skills Camp, for Grades 9-11, is set for 3:30 to 6 p.m.Camp instruction will focus on implementing fundamental skills into fun and competitive drills and games.For more information go to www.kootenaychill.com or [email protected]last_img read more

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A very successful day for Connacht GAA Wheelchair Hurling Team

first_imgPictured above (Front Left to right): Tom Fleming (Mayo), Pat Carty (Sligo), Peter Egan (Mayo), Aidan Hynes (Sligo), Liam O’Boyle (Mayo), Shane Curran (Galway) and Sarah Cregg (Roscommon). Missing from photograph is Steven Melvin (Sligo). The Connacht Wheelchair Hurling Team won all their three games in Round 3 of the Michael Donnelly Interprovincial Wheelchair Hurling League which took place in front of a very large local support at the Joe Langan Sports Hall, Davitt College, Castlebar, Co. Mayo on Saturday the 24th August 2019.  The Connacht Wheelchair Hurling Team defeated Ulster 5-1, won 3-2 against Munster and defeated Leinster 2-1. The Connacht Wheelchair Hurling team is wished continued success in the final and fourth round of M. Donnelly Interprovincial Wheelchair Hurling League takes place on Saturday 14th September in St Marys Secondary School, Newport, Co. Tipperary. (Back Row, L to R) Billy Mc Nicholas (Mayo GAA Games Manager), Christy Tyrell (Galway GAA Representative), Denis O’Boyle (Secretary , Connacht GAA Health and Wellbeing and Games for All Committee), Seamus Touhy (Vice Chairman, Mayo GAA Co Board), Bernie Rowland, (Principal of Davitt College, Castlebar), Tim Hynes  (Connacht Team Coach), Gerry Mc Govern (President of the Connacht Council), Tadhg Morley (Connacht Team Coach) Geraldine  McTavish,  (National GAA Diversity and Inclusion Officer), Mattie Kilroy (Chairman, Connacht GAA Health and Wellbeing and Games for All Committee), John Hopkins (Connacht P.R.O.) Gerry Bourke ( Mayo GAA Connacht Council Representative).print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img read more

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First fern genomes sequenced — and they hold a lot of promise

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Despite being one of the most diverse groups of plants on the planet, ferns were until recently the only major plant group to not have their genomes sequenced.Now, for the first time ever, biologists have sequenced the genomes of two tiny ferns, Azolla filiculoides and Salvinia cucullata, and their findings have some major implications for agriculture.The fern experts now hope to sequence other fern genomes and unravel more fern secrets. For the first time ever, biologists have sequenced the genomes of two tiny ferns, Azolla filiculoides and Salvinia cucullata, and they’ve revealed some interesting secrets.Despite being one of the most diverse groups of plants on the planet, ferns were the only major plant group to not have their genomes sequenced until now.“This however is not due to lack of interest, but the fact that fern genomes tend to be humongous,” Fay-Wei Li, a plant biologist at the Boyce Thompson Institute and Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, told Mongabay in an email.Ferns can have as many as 720 pairs of chromosomes and genomes as big as 148 billion base pairs of DNA sequences (Gb). By contrast, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the first plant to have its genome sequenced, has only five pairs of chromosomes and a genome size of 0.135 Gb. (For comparison, the human genome has around 3 billion base pairs).Li and his team, however, found that both Azolla and its sister genus, Salvinia, have extremely small genomes — A. filiculoides is 0.75 Gb while S. cucullata is 0.26 Gb — making them good candidates for genome sequencing. “We were excited about this result, and an international consortium was assembled to sequence these two ferns,” Li said.Salvinia cucullata, or Asian watermoss. Image by Ziegler175 via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).But there was a problem. Getting funding for the genome project wasn’t easy, and all their letters of intent were declined, Li said. So the researchers tried to get some funding through a crowdfunding site called Experiment.com.“We saw our colleagues doing a crowdfunding campaign to support their field expedition, and we thought, hey that’s cool,” Li said. “The first few days of crowdfunding were basically just us (and my mom!) throwing money into the pot. But with lots of social networking (I learned how to tweet for the first time! follow me @fern_way), the news spread…”With support from around the world, Li and his colleagues were not only able to obtain enough funds to sequence both species of fern, but they also connected with other researchers who then became involved in the genome project.Four years later, the researchers have published their results in Nature Plants.Tiny ferns with “super” powersThe ferns that the team selected have some very interesting traits. Azolla, for instance, is believed to have played a major role in cooling down the planet several million years ago, earning it the title of “super-plant.” In what geologists call the “Azolla event,” huge blooms of Azolla covered the Artic Sea some 50 million years ago, removing large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, turning a greenhouse Earth with warm temperatures at the poles into today’s planet with polar ice caps.Azolla is also used as a “green manure” in rice farms in Asia. The fern, sometimes called the mosquito fern or fairy moss, harbors a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium called Nostoc azollae within its leaves that captures nitrogen from the atmosphere and converts it into forms that the ferns and rice plants can use. But unlike most other plant-microbe symbiotic partnerships, N. azollae is associated with Azolla throughout its life cycle and transfers from a parent to offspring every time the fern reproduces. In most other plants, each generation has to get its symbiotic microbes from the environment.A macro photograph of Azolla filiculoides. Image by Laura Dijkhuizen.Li and his colleagues identified several genes that are specific to Azolla’s interactions with its symbiont bacteria, whose genomes have been sequenced previously.“Now that we have genomes available for both the fern and cyanobacterium, there is great promise for tapping into the secrets of this natural biofertilizer that may help lead to future sustainable agricultural practices,” Kathleen Pryer, a professor at Duke University, U.S., said in a statement.Ferns are also good at fending off insects. “When you walk into a forest, it’s usually very striking to find that ferns show little to no sign of insect damage,” Li said.But when the researchers tracked down the gene responsible for the insecticidal proteins in S. cucullata, also known as the Asian watermoss, they were surprised to find that the gene had likely come not from its plant ancestors, but from bacteria.“The finding that the fern insecticidal protein coming from bacteria was a big surprise,” Li said. “An important implication [of this] is that genes move around naturally among organisms, and perhaps GMOs” —genetically modified organisms — “are not as ‘unnatural’ as people tend to think. It’s a naturally modified gene, and now that we’ve found it, it could have huge implications for agriculture.”The fern experts now hope to sequence other fern genomes.“We are going fernatic to sequence more ferntastic genomes!” Li said. “Obviously the current two fern genomes do not give us the complete picture of fern genome structure and evolution. We want to eventually address why fern genomes can be so big… Currently we have about 10 fern species in the sequencing pipeline.”Tiny Azolla filiculoides on Fay-Wei Li’s fingernail. Image by Fay-Wei Li.Citation:Li, F. W., Brouwer, P., Carretero-Paulet, L., Cheng, S., de Vries, J., Delaux, P. M., … & Simenc, M. (2018). Fern genomes elucidate land plant evolution and cyanobacterial symbioses. Nature plants, 1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41477-018-0188-8.center_img Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Science, Environment, Genetics, Green, Oceans, Plants, Research, Wildlife last_img read more

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Homeboyz’s Murunga eyes Christies Main Cup

first_img0Shares0000Homeboyz RFC head coach Paul Murunga during a past leg of the National Sevens Series.NAIROBI, Kenya, Sep 14 – Despite only needing a semi-final spot at the season ending Christie Sevens in Nairobi this weekend, Homeboyz RFC head coach Paul Murunga has underlined his desire to clinch the Main Cup title and finish the season in style.Homeboyz lead the National Series standings with 100 points, eight ahead of second placed Mwamba who beat them to last weekend’s Dala Sevens in Kisumu and have clinched three of the five legs played so far in the circuit. “My plan was to win all the Cups this season and I am a bit disappointed that we lost the last two. Nevertheless, I want us to finish the season in style by winning at Christies. Yes, we need to just get to the semis to clinch the overall title, but that will not be enough for me,” Murunga, a former National team assistant coach said.The Deejays have been emphatic this season, just as they were in 2016 when they won their inaugural series title and as it seems, they are headed to a second crown this weekend.Homeboyz RFC will face Nakuru, Menengai Oilers and and a combined Blue Bulls and TUKS side from South Africa.Only way they can be stopped is if they don’t make it past the quarters and Mwamba go all the way and clinch the Main Cup at the RFUEA ground.Homeboyz headline Pool B where they will clash with invitational side Blue Bulls and TUK Combined, last season’s surprise package Menengai Oilers and fourth placed Nakuru RFC.“It is not an easy pool at all and we need to be very careful going about it. The invited team from South Africa bears a lot of experience and the other two teams are not easy as well,” a cautious Murunga noted.He will be without top try scorer Mark Wandetto who picked up an injury at the Dala Sevens as well as Kenyan international Augustine Lugonzo who has not been passed fit for the Christies call.Homeboyz players celebrating a try in a previous match. PHOTO/Timothy OlobuluBut, skipper Leonard Mugaisi who missed the Dala final with injury has been passed fit and will be in line to lead the side to their Canaan.Christies defending champions Kabras Sugar will meanwhile look to finish the season on a high after struggling for most of it but will be without inspirational Ugandan international Philip Wokarach and Kenya Sevens big man Daniel Sikuta.Kabras are fifth in the standings and their best performance this season was at the Sepetuka Sevens in Eldoret where they picked 13 points.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Carlos Pena: Rangers move would fulfil my European dream

first_imgCarlos Pena has said that it has always been his dream to play in Europe and he hopes to get back to his best by signing for Rangers.Pena has left Mexico to travel to Glasgow and tie up a deal with the Ibrox club to become Pedro Caixinha’s third signing in the space of a week. He’ll follow Bruno Alves and Ryan Jack in committing to Rangers for next season.The 27-year old had been awaiting paperwork clearance before travelling but has has now begun his journey to Scotland to finalise the deal.“It is my dream to go to Europe and I hope everything will go alright,” Pena said. “My aim is to get back to my former level of playing and to get along with Mr Caixinha and with all the supporters over there.“My manager and I were looking for this but it was Caixinha who made it possible.”last_img read more

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Organized Retail Theft

first_imgIn Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens wrote about a group of youths from about 10 to 14 years of age who were formed into a band of professional pickpockets by an older man named Fagin. Fagin befriended these young people by providing them with shelter, food, and drink only to be able to control and direct them in their pocket picking activities to his benefit.Today, we occasionally discover organized retail theft groups comprised of young people engaged in shoplifting for the benefit of a controlling adult—a modern-day Fagin. This type of organized retail theft (ORT) is just the tip of a very large iceberg threatening the core of our economic enterprise.Forty years ago, organized retail theft in a different form plagued the East Coast. Gangs of professional adult thieves from various countries in South America in an organized and well-planned scheme were targeting high-end designer clothes from department and specialty stores from Boston to Atlanta. Intelligence on these gangs revealed that representatives from each gang would meet on a Monday morning in Providence, RI, and lay out the routes for the week. The Chileans might head toward New York City, the Peruvians would go to Philadelphia, the Colombians to Baltimore and Washington, and the Ecuadorians to the Carolinas and Atlanta. The following week, a similar meeting would take place and the victim retailers would be reassigned.- Sponsor – These ethnically organized professional shoplifter rings still exist, although in smaller numbers, and hit stores in all parts of the United States.From Designer Clothing to Household GoodsToday, there is a rapidly growing and different type of organized retail theft occurring all across North America. The targeted products are everyday household commodities, such as over-the-counter pharmaceuticals (Tylenol, Advil, etc.), analgesics, razor blades, film, batteries, videos, DVDs, CDs, smoking cessation and eye-care products, and infant formula. The list can change quickly, but they are generally the basics that are usually in high demand.The thieves today are often highly organized former convicted felons who learned of this new way to make a substantial tax-free cash income during conversations with other inmates while strolling through the exercise yards of America’s prisons. These professional thieves, who steal as much as $5,000 of retail product per day, are known as boosters.The term booster is used to refer to someone who steals for a living and who is involved in an organized criminal enterprise. They have a buyer for their merchandise who has very clear knowledge that the products that they are purchasing for 10 to 15 cents on the retail dollar are, in fact, obtained illegally. Some boosters use the profits from this enterprise to support families and lifestyles that are not unlike the neighbors on the streets where we live. Some boosters, however, steal to support drug habits or other addictions.Today, there is a rapidly growing and different type of organized retail theft occurring all across North America. The targeted products are everyday household commodities, such as over-the-counter pharmaceuticals (Tylenol, Advil, etc.), analgesics, razor blades, film, batteries, videos, DVDs, CDs, smoking cessation and eye-care products, and infant formula.Interviewing a Typical BoosterSeveral years ago, investigators from Target Corporation interviewed an apprehended, prosecuted, and convicted booster on camera. This individual was not a junkie, but, instead, was very much a “guy next door.” Because his sentencing and probation judge required him to give these interviews, he was very frightened for his own safety. The organization with whom he had been previously affiliated in his career as a booster would likely kill him if they knew he was talking with both his victims and law enforcement as to how, why, and with whom he was plying his trade.During the interviews, this man admitted he had made $120,000 to $150,000 cash per year during the previous three years. The organization that purchased the stolen products from him was very specific as to what products they wanted. With his hit list, he would target drug stores, grocery stores, discount stores, and convenience stores from San Francisco to San Diego. He usually “worked” between four and five days a week, never on weekends, and took vacation from Thanksgiving through Christmas. He had been caught occasionally, but no one who had caught, arrested, or prosecuted him knew of the extent of his activities and the organization behind him until his last arrest.The Organized Retail Theft “Sales Cycle”Whether the booster is part of a highly organized system, such as the individual interviewed by Target’s national investigation service team, or an independent thief, the path the stolen product takes is generally the same. The booster will steal the items from numerous retailers and then sell the products to a fence. The fence then “markets” the product by offering it for sale from a booth in one of America’s thousands of flea markets or through the world’s largest flea market…Internet auction sites. The products sold by the fence through these venues are generally near their expiration date or the cartons are slightly damaged. That doesn’t matter to the fence, however, because what he is really doing is advertising that he is in the business and can get product from his boosters.The middle buyer, the one who buys in quantity from the fence, sees the products offered for sale by the fence and negotiates the desired items and quantities he will purchase. These “orders” get back to the boosters through the fence, and the boosters then steal the requested items from retailers.The middle buyer will resell large quantities of products to a separate repackaging operation, or could be the owner of a repackaging operation himself. These repackagers usually operate in a facility that is about 3,000 to 5,000 square feet. Inside are several employees, usually illegal immigrant women, who clean up stolen product. They use cotton swabs with fingernail polish remover, alcohol, or lighter fluid to remove price tickets and EAS tag adhesive residue. They may change expiration dates and lot codes. They then repackage the small items into master cases complete with the brand name of the product stamped on the outside. Sometimes this stolen, repackaged product is co-mingled with illegally diverted or counterfeit product at the repackager. Sometimes the comingling takes place at the next destination, which is the wholesaler.The wholesaler is often a large, publicly traded company that on the surface appears to be very legitimate. Some of these wholesalers have been sued by product manufacturers and investigated by federal law enforcement, but their battery of lawyers has always managed to keep them in business.These wholesalers sell their products to retailers. While the wholesalers do legitimately buy product from manufacturers that are overruns or special deals, the legitimate product sometimes finds itself comingled with the illegitimate and counterfeit product that then is purchased by the unsuspecting retailer and placed on the store shelves to be purchased by consumers.Can you imagine buying a container of pain reliever that at one point in its life cycle may have been concealed in the filthy underwear of a strung-out dope addict?Efforts to Combat Organized Retail TheftThe Food Marketing Institute (FMI) has taken a leadership role in trying to understand the scope of organized retail theft. Chuck Miller, former vice president of loss prevention services for FMI, was instrumental in the initiatives his association has undertaken.“FMI produced an educational video on ORT entitled Thieves Market,” Miller explained. “This 13- minute video is used to explain the problem to retailers, law enforcement, and legislators. In fact, Thieves Market were also being used as a training tool at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia, to train law enforcement professionals and FBI special agents to better understand the methods of product theft and distribution in organized retail theft.A second project was a research program to determine the what, the who, and the where this organized retail theft activity is occurring. Working with FMI on the project was CDO Solutions, a Washington, DC-based solutions provider company and Digital Data Development (DDD), a Las Vegas, NV-based global leader in advanced collusion detection technology.Miller explained that they collected data from a large number of members of the Food Marketing Institute. And, with help from CDO Solutions and DDD, they accomplished the following objectives:• Identify the target items boosters are stealing. • Identify the geographic markets where this theft is occurring. • Identify boosters who share common addresses, phone numbers, or identification numbers.“Our ultimate goal in this project is to raise the awareness of the problem and get manufacturers, retailers, and law enforcement to help influence and drive legislative changes if and where appropriate,” said Miller.Jeff Jonas, former CEO of DDD said that before becoming involved in this project he was personally not aware of the scope or magnitude of organized retail theft. And, until the results of this project were made known, he felt the general public also had no clue as to the immense size of the problem.John Bliss, former president and CEO of CDO Solutions and currently general counsel and chief privacy officer at Atigeo, explained that the real problems caused by organized retail theft are significant to manufacturers, retailers, and the consuming public.Retailers are losing an estimated $30 billion just to theft by boosters. This figure doesn’t include the incremental costs incurred by retailer when they unwittingly repurchase the stolen product, not to mention the significant cost of lost sales until the out-of-stocks are discovered and replenished.“Manufacturers experience brand and market share erosion when three feet of product shelf space has been wiped out by a booster and the consumer seeks a substitute from the competition,” added Bliss. “In addition, the manufacturer loses control of the distribution of the product.”Bliss cited Coca-Cola’s diversion incident in Europe in 1999 that ultimately impacted shareholder value in that company and caused its CEO to resign. Bliss believes the best way to attack organized retail theft is through a holistic, integrated approach by manufacturers, retailers, and law enforcement.Legislation Necessary to Focus on ORTWe must continue to draft and enact legislation that will differentiate organized retail theft from common shoplifting, so that the penalties for organized retail theft crimes are far more meaningful than they are today. We simply have to change the risk and reward ratio to even the playing field to benefit the victims and penalize the criminals. Currently, federal laws need to do more to really address the crimes of counterfeiting and organized retail theft. Legislation needs to be enacted that will make it easier for prosecutors and for the business community to pursue both criminal and civil remedies against organized retail theft.It is imperative that a strong understanding and partnership be developed between corporate security and loss prevention teams and law enforcement to deliberately and surgically attack this growing problem. Having our retail stores continuously victimized by ORT creates unsafe situations for both employees and customers, in addition to the negative impact on the economy.The problem of organized retail theft isn’t limited to the United States. Other countries are also experiencing its impact. Canada, for example, is seeking tougher penalties for the sale of stolen goods in flea markets. Numerous search-and seizure incidences from Vancouver east to Halifax have taken place, resulting in recovery of millions of dollars worth of stolen product from flea markets, repackagers, and wholesalers.Joint Law Enforcement OperationsIn one incident, the New York state Office of the Attorney General issued a press release describing the dismantling of a huge organized retail theft ring that they believed caused $35 million of loss from stores in just eleven counties in upstate New York.“The individuals involved in this ring set out to plunder upstate stores on a daily basis,” former New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer said. “The extent of this crime and the frequency with which it occurred is shocking.”Members of this ring targeted specific items that are easy to resell, including Walt Disney videos, Gillette razor blades, Duracell and Eveready batteries, compact discs, video games, calculators, printer cartridges, Tylenol, Advil, film and disposable cameras, electric shavers, tools, and small electronics. Among the stores targeted by this ring were national retail chains such as J.C. Penney, Sears, Wal- Mart, Kmart, CVS/pharmacy, Staples, and Office Max.Elsewhere in the Atlanta area Operation American Dream culminated in 41 federal arrests, 45 local arrests, the seizure of approximately $450,000 plus five luxury vehicles, and the recovery of approximately $1.6 million in stolen retail merchandise. Operation American Dream was a joint federal, Georgia state, and Atlanta police department investigation that took several years, thousands of manhours, and millions of taxpayer dollars to conclude. The Atlanta-based U.S. Attorney stated that this organized theft ring was responsible for tens of millions of dollars of loss from numerous stores around Atlanta, including Target, Wal- Mart, Kmart, Publix, and Kroger. Coconspirators in Baltimore, New York, and Pakistan were also arrested in this operation.Ongoing Efforts to Combat Organized Retail TheftOrganized retail theft rings have been discovered and broken up in most states across America in the past five years. Yet, the problem continues. Some states are just now beginning to acknowledge the existence of ORT criminal activity and are taking steps to impact it. The attorney general of the State of Massachusetts formed an organized theft task force consisting of retail organizations and law enforcement agencies in that state to address education and legislative action to influence this serious issue.The Kansas State House Judiciary Committee heard testimony from Wal-Mart investigators stating that “there has been an increase in organized retail theft by traveling boosters who have become more sophisticated and aware of the types of crimes that can be committed at this misdemeanor level. A large number of these individuals are involved in the use of illegal drugs. Retail theft provides a low-risk and high-reward method to support their drug habits.”There is an old saying that you can’t kill a snake unless you cut off its head. In the case of organized retail theft, until the illicit wholesalers are dismantled, the problem will continue. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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People on the Move: March 2017

first_imgProfessional advancement and building a successful loss prevention career can mean many things to many different people. For some individuals it may mean reaching a top leadership position at a particular company, perhaps serving as a director or vice president of loss prevention/asset protection. For others, it may involve gaining experience in multiple professional fields in order to establish a unique and versatile role that capitalizes on all of our various skill sets. Some aspire to be the very best at a particular skill or discipline, building a base of knowledge and expertise that sets us apart from the rest. There are those that strive to leave a professional legacy, leaving a lasting mark on the present and future of the loss prevention industry. And there are still others that simply want the recognition that comes with reaching a particular level of performance and the security that it provides.There are many different ways to evaluate our career vision and professional aspirations. But what is most important is that we find the path that fits us best. We need to fashion and follow a professional development plan that leads us forward and builds our future. Especially when involved in a profession that is evolving as quickly as retail loss prevention, career growth is essential to professional survival. Whatever our professional goals and aspirations might be; whatever skills and experiences have helped forge our personal loss prevention career path, we have to find and seize the opportunities to learn, grow, and progress.All of us throughout the loss prevention community are proud of the accomplishments of those that have worked hard and earned a new place along the loss prevention career path. Please join us in congratulating the following individuals on their recent career moves and promotions.- Sponsor – March 2017Brad Milo is now East Coast loss prevention manager at AeropostaleMatthew Schoenauer is now a senior ORC investigator at TJX CompaniesDale Jackson is now a regional loss prevention manager at Charming CharlieGloria Fausto-Figueroa is now a regional asset protection manager at Advanced Auto PartsJeremiah Brajczewski is now an ORC Investigations Area Supervisor at UNIQLOLuis Loayza is now an ORC market investigator at Victoria’s SecretCarolyn Korchik, CFI named Global Security & Retail Loss Prevention Operations Manager at Levi Strauss  Click here to learn moreSteve Boarman was promoted to the Director of Central Investigations & ORC at Macy’sGreg Adams was named Director of Loss Prevention with A.C. Moore  Click here to learn moreCharles Simms was promoted to market manager of asset and profit protection at Sears Holdings CorporationTeri Railey was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Gap Inc.Jeremy Nerbonne was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at LIDS Sports GroupTed Younes is now a regional loss prevention manager at GNCMichael Romeo is now a regional supply chain investigations manager at TJX Canada/WinnersBrian Tolbert was promoted to territory asset protection manager at Sears Holdings CorporationJaclyn Kachur was promoted to regional manager of loss prevention at Indigo Books and MusicLarry Martinez was promoted to district manager of investigations at Macy’sRussell Fisher is now a district asset protection manager at Stage StoresMeredith Plaxco was promoted to director of loss prevention & safety – strategy, operations, and field at PetSmartAlmond Dennis, Jr. was promoted to market asset and profit protection manager at Sears Holdings, Co.Robert Malone was promoted to district asset protection manager at Saks Fifth AvenueHank Siemers, CFI promoted to vice president of global retail security at Tiffany & Co.  Click here to learn morePaul Jaeckle, LPC named vice president asset protection at Meijer’s  Click here to learn moreChris DeSantis, CFI promoted to vice president of asset protection for the Herald Square district at Macy’sAntonio Harris promoted to regional director of investigations at Macy’sNicole Thorne promoted to asset protection business intelligence analyst at Macy’sJanet Rodriguez promoted to organized retail crime analyst at Macy’sTim Huff promoted to director of national events for asset protection at Macy’sBrian Goddard promoted to manager of AP innovation and implementation at Macy’sJay Morales named regional security manager at McDonald’sKelly Moye, CFI promoted to assistant vice president of operations and investigations at GM FinancialMelanie Meschwitz, CFI was promoted to senior regional loss prevention & safety manager at PetSmartJaclynn Arabe was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Old NavyAdam Stokes CFI is now lead supply chain loss prevention manager at ULTA BeautyBob Jensen is now a regional director of asset protection at Rite AidMichelle Cabrita, CFI named senior corporate investigator at Barnes & Noble, Inc.Eric Ives, LPC was named director of special investigations for LuxotticaMaurizio Scrofani, CCSP, LPC was named vice president of supply chain security and intelligence at Grupo ALTO  Click here to learn moreJim Zurawski is now an area loss prevention manager at HEBRobert Fanuko is now a field loss prevention manager at StaplesGarth Gasse, CFI was promoted to national loss prevention manager – US & Canada at SSP AmericaRobert Grant is now an area loss prevention manager at Ross Stores, IncMatt Barnett was promoted to corporate loss prevention analyst at BelkIan Amato, LPC was named national loss prevention manager at Maison BirksTracy Beltram was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Old NavyChristopher Crossman promoted to Senior Director of Loss Prevention Operations at CVS Health  Click here to learn moreClarence Gooding is now a regional loss prevention specialist at Shoppers Drug MartNeil Baker was promoted to regional business partner, loss prevention at Total Wine and MoreJoshua Kastner was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at TJX CompaniesDavid Homolka was named VP of human resources at Duluth Trading CompanyMichael Woods is now director of assets protection & safety at Denny’sMichael Fallon Jr. is now a market asset and profit protection leader at Sears Holdings Co.Brett Marksberry was promoted to director, supply chain asset protection at Macy’s Logistics and OperationsRyin Francis was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Gap Inc./Old NavyReinaldo Valdes was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Shoe CarnivalDavid Powers CFI is now a territory AP leader at Ascena Retail GroupBob Serenson is now a strategic account manager at Checkpoint SystemsSpenser Valerga was promoted to area asset protection manager at JC PenneyAntonio Harris was promoted to regional director of investigations at Macy’sRey Rodriguez was promoted to district director of asset protection at MacysAshley O’Rourke was promoted to area loss prevention manager at NordstromGarrett Rodriguez was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Gap Inc./Old NavyMario Cardia, CFI was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Gap Inc./Old NavyJoseph Carteret, CFI was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Gap Inc./Old NavySteven Bond was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Gap Inc./Old NavyMatthew Koury, CFI was promoted to regional loss prevention manager at Gap Inc.Justin Evans is now an area asset protection manager at Stein MartJamie Jones was promoted to corporate security analyst at AldiLise Lang, CFI was named corporate investigations – US and Canada at StarbucksTo review the February “People on the Move” click here.Many of the Loss Prevention / Asset Protection career moves and promotions are reported to us by our career advisor partners. We are grateful for their collective efforts and diligence in delivering this information. If you would like to provide information pertaining to a recent promotion or career move that is not listed below, we welcome your submissions by clicking here. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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