After Record-Breaking Opening Weekend, Beauty and the Beast to Become Most Successful Movie Musical Ever

first_img Disney’s big-screen remake of Beauty and the Beast is on track to become the most successful live-action movie musical of all time, raking in an estimated $170 million in its opening weekend.That summer-sized box office take makes the film the most successful March opening in history, and the seventh-largest film opening ever. Internationally, Beauty and the Beast earned another $180 million, bringing the global gross to $350 million.Directed by Bill Condon, the film can expect to overtake the highest-grossing movie musical, 1978’s Grease ($188 million lifetime gross) within days. The other top movie musicals domestically are the Oscar-winning Chicago at $170.6 million, La La Land at $149 million, Les Misérables at $148 million and Mamma Mia! at $144 million.It will still need to show box-office muscle to outrank animated movie musicals, however. In that genre, The Lion King has grossed $422 million, with Frozen ($400 million), Moana ($248 million), the animated Beauty and the Beast ($218 million), Aladdin ($217 million) and Tarzan ($171 million) all rounding out the list.This is great news for Disney, which has fast-tracked more popular titles that started as animated films, then went onto Broadway success and are now heading back to cinemas in live-action format; Aladdin, The Little Mermaid and The Lion King are all in the works.Based on the 1991 animated film, Beauty and the Beast stars Emma Watson as Belle, Dan Stevens as the Beast, Luke Evans as Gaston, Josh Gad as LeFou, Kevin Kline as Maurice, Ewan McGregor as Lumiere, Ian McKellen as Cogsworth, Emma Thompson as Mrs. Potts, Gugu Mbatha-Raw as Plumette, Stanley Tucci as Maestro Cadenza and six-time Tony Award winner Audra McDonald as Madame Garderobe. It features the beloved songs by Alan Menken and the late Howard Ashman, as well as new songs by Menken and Tim Rice.Did you catch the film in theaters this weekend? Rank your favorite performances in our Culturalist challenge! View Comments ‘Beauty and the Beast’last_img read more

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Fr. Glenn: The Freedom Of Truth

first_imgBy Fr. Glenn JonesIs anyone—everyone—confused? Perhaps more than we think. With the onslaught of conflicting information concerning the various candidates in the upcoming election, it’s hard not to be. We find ourselves continuously having to ask: “Is this … or is it that … report which is correct; they are claiming essentially opposite things. Did this thing even really happen … and as they say it happened? Did he or she really do what is alleged?Sigh. For those who want to be truly informed and not simply vote for the “correct” letter by a name, it can be a jungle out there. But, unfortunately, politics has always been that way. One reads in the history of the Roman republic of the same (even worse) jockeying for position of candidates for the ruling consuls’ seats, with all sorts of accusations, misinformation and mud thrown around. The same has certainly occurred in this nation throughout its history as well … as we older who have seen many elections well know. After all, scriptwriters of even the old classic “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” didn’t get their plot from thin air or wild imagination.Where power exists, it will be pursued at least some (most?) of the time with selfish purpose—whether in national governments, businesses, churches or wherever; that is simply a tragic reality of our human condition. Founders of organizations often have the best motives and purpose, but they eventually pass them on to others who may not; it is quite difficult to discern hearts’ intentions, regardless of outward claims or past record. Not infrequently people will present a helpful and loyal Dr. Jekyll mien while in lower ranks, then transform into Mr. Hyde when attaining higher position. Or, like Judas Iscariot, even betray their own benefactors and former mentors for material gain.Wealth and fame, power and authority are strong attractors for our species, and in pursuit of those, truth, integrity and unselfish purpose are all-too-often discarded when the former are achieved. In the choice of government officials such is particularly detrimental, however, because their pursuit of self is to the hurt of those who govern—embezzled funds from taxes, bribes, shady deals, etc. And thus of information is vital for the greater good of the many when it comes to choosing those who govern. How can voters possibly make good decisions without truth? Misinformation is simply an attempt at coercion using false pretenses. One cannot help but want to question the misinformer: “If you are confident and seek the common good by your position, then why do you misinform?” And, of course, those who spread misinformation may themselves be misinformed, and thus the snowball rolls farther down the hill and picks up speed and mass. Jesus tells a parable of two brothers: one who tells his father that he will obey but does not, and the other who says he will not obey and yet repents and does so. Despite the second son’s initial impertinence, Jesus says it is he who actually does the will of his father.All too often, though, poorly chosen (often because of misinformation) officials are like the first son—mouthing the right words to voters simply to get elected, but afterward acting quite oppositely for selfish purpose. This, of course, is terribly frustrating to those who put their trust in them, and in the various sources of information upon which they based their decision that they theretofore had considered trustworthy. Voters are most often sincere and desire the best for all the governed, and conscience would not allow most a moment’s peace should they have acted otherwise; thus, they are mystified when betrayed and cannot imagine how deceitful persons can “live with themselves”. But, alas, the deceitful can and do … and often without apparent qualms or remorse. So the sincere have to always be alert to that sad reality, remembering Jesus’ own warning: “I send you out as sheep in the midst of wolves; so be wise as serpents and innocent as doves.” (Matthew 10:16), and for us to remember that: “He who is faithful in a very little is faithful also in much; and he who is dishonest in a very little is dishonest also in much.” (Luke 16:10) How wonderful it would be if we could simply trust, and that those who govern—and those who inform—were unfailingly trust-worthy, carrying the burden of governance with honor. Well … we may not be able to change the world, but we can certainly mold ourselves, becoming the persons which WE long to associate with: trustworthy, self-giving, honest in all circumstances. After all, we remember Jesus:  “…whatever you have said in the dark shall be heard in the light, and what you have whispered in private rooms shall be proclaimed upon the housetops” (Luke 12:3), and in John’s Revelation: “Behold, I am coming soon, bringing my recompense, to repay every one for what he has done.” (Revelation 22:12)  Rather than dread that day, live as to look for it with anxious anticipation and so as to be received into the Heavenly habitations with the words ringing in our ears: “Well done, good and faithful servant; you have been faithful over a little…enter into the joy of your master.” (Matthew 25:23)Pilate said to [Jesus], ‘What is truth?’” (John 18:37-38)“Jesus said… ‘I am the way, and the truth, and the life…’” (John 14:6)Rev. Glenn Jones is the Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe and former pastor of Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Los Alamos.last_img read more

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UWF Women’s Basketball Announces Summer Camps

first_img UWF Head Coach Shannan Bergen (www.jimhoguephotos.com) UWF Women’s Basketball Announces Summer Camps PENSACOLA, Fla. – Shannan Bergen and her staff are proud to present this year’s team and individual basketball camps. An individual day camp will be held for girls entering 3rd -12th grades during the week of June 22-26, 2009. In addition, Coach Bergen will be holding a camp available for teams to participate in through the weekend of June 26-28, 2009.The Shannan Bergen Girls Camp will be held beginning on Monday, June 22-Thursday, June 25 from 8:30am – 3pm. On Friday, June 26, camp will last from 8:30am – 12pm. Cost per camper is $150, with a $50 non-refundable deposit due with the application. The remaining balance is due at registration on June 22 at 8am. Included in camp costs are individualized offensive and defensive skills training with UWF staff and players, along with sessions to explain general rules of play. Campers will participate in open recreation swimming and a pizza party on Thursday. A camp t-shirt is provided, but campers must either bring their own sack lunch or purchase lunch at their own expense at the University Commons. The Shannan Bergen Team Camp is available for girls teams, with check-in beginning on June 26 at 1pm. Game play will begin immediately following and run until the afternoon on June 28. Cost for camp is $300 per team, with $100 non-refundable deposit due with mail-in registration by May 19, 2009. In addition, each player must fill out a player registration form to be eligible for competition. Each team will play a minimum of six games, with additional games available for a cost of $25 per game. Games will be officiated by UWF Intramural Officials.Flyers and registration forms can be found online at www.GoArgos.com by visiting the women’s basketball page or camps link. For more information on camps, contact UWF assistant coach Laura Davis at (850)474-2589 or [email protected] Print Friendly Versioncenter_img Sharelast_img read more

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Self-inflicted mistakes prove costly in Alabama loss

first_imgMississippi wide receiver Laquon Treadwell, right, catches a pass for a touchdown over Alabama defensive back Cyrus Jones, left, during the second half Saturday in Tuscaloosa.Mississippi wide receiver Laquon Treadwell, right, catches a pass for a touchdown over Alabama defensive back Cyrus Jones, left, during the second half Saturday in Tuscaloosa.TUSCALOOSA — The pain in the eyes of the Alabama players that braved the postgame media incursion was clear.Almost as clear as their indignation at all the self-inflicted mistakes that proved to be the Crimson Tide’s biggest undoing in Saturday night’s 43-37 loss to Ole Miss.“It hurts, that’s all I can say, man. It felt like we just gave them the game,” Alabama senior corner Cyrus Jones said. “They didn’t come in here and beat us — we messed up. That’s how we feel right now.”While emotions were certainly high after another tough-to-swallow defeat at the hands of the Rebels — marking the first time in the 121-year history of the conference series that Ole Miss has won back-to-back games — there is more than a little bit of truth to Jones’ assertion.Four of a record-tying five turnovers by Alabama (2-1, 0-1 SEC) helped contribute to 24 points by the Rebels, including the first three turnovers leading directly to all 17 of Ole Miss’ first-half points as the Rebels built an early two-touchdown advantage (17-3) 24 minutes into the game. The negative-five turnover ratio was the program’s worst-ever mark in the Nick Saban era.“Obviously when you have five turnovers in a game it’s kind of hard to win, especially when you didn’t get any,” Saban said. “We’re minus-five with turnovers this game, and that makes it a bit difficult in the second half when they have a couple of big plays that made huge differences in the game.”The uncharacteristic miscues began six seconds into the game when Alabama sophomore ArDarius Stewart fumbled the opening kickoff return after colliding with teammate linebacker Dillon Lee, who was attempting to make a block on the play.The result was a short 32-yard field from Ole Miss kicker Gary Wunderlich after Alabama’s defense held strong.The Rebels’ next came after a head-scratching interception from sophomore quarterback Cooper Bateman, who was making his first career start in place of senior Jake Coker.On second-and-8 from his own 18-yard line, Bateman sailed a 30-yard throw well over the head of his intended target, Stewart, who cut inside on a slant rather than stay on the fly route, and Ole Miss safety Trae Elston picked it off.“The one that Cooper threw was probably not good judgment. He got kind of jammed in the seam, and he overthrew it,” Saban said.Bateman wouldn’t throw another pass as coaches replaced him with Coker on the next offensive series, but not before Ole Miss scored two touchdowns in the next 3:15 for a 17-3 lead.Of course, the mistakes weren’t all turnovers, with several coverage busts and a fair share of missed tackles by some of Alabama’s younger defensive backs proved equally as costly, especially during a second-half full of big plays.The first few Rebel series of the second half had several secondary miscues, including a busted coverage by Jones on third-and-8 that allowed Ole Miss receiver Laquon Treadwell to get open for a 29-yard gain into Alabama territory.After a three-and-out by the Tide, there was another defensive breakdown on a corner blitz by Jones when senior safety Geno Matias-Smith failed to cover Rebels receiver Cody Core for a 34-yard gain. Both long plays put Ole Miss into field goal range where Wunderlich connected on kicks of 34 and 45 yards, respectively, for a 30-10 lead late in the third quarter.Behind the play of Coker, receiver Richard Mullaney and running back Derrick Henry, Alabama managed to fight back and pull back within 30-24 21/2 minutes into the fourth quarter.That’s when another defensive mistake combined with another turnover led to a 13-point swing in momentum the other way, beginning with a 73-yard touchdown pass from Kelly to Core on a run-pass option play reminiscent of a similar score in the famous “Kick Six” game at Auburn.On second-and-1, Kelly rolled to his right as outside linebacker Denzel Devall gave chase parallel to the first-down marker. But the threat of run caused Humphrey to leave Core all alone, and Kelly released the ball just as his body crossed the line of scrimmage, connecting with a wide-open Core for the big play.“It was a miscommunication and everybody wasn’t playing the same coverage on the option-pass they hit,” Saban explained. “It’s just a lot of things that we did that we controlled that allowed them to put us in a hole in the game.”Initially ruled an illegal pass, the touchdown stood after it was determined Kelly’s right leg was still behind the line.“It was just a tough play, man, I’ve been in that situation before obviously, so it’s definitely a tough one and you’ve just got to be disciplined,” Jones said of Humphrey.After being relatively mistake-free through his first 26 minutes of action, Coker stared down tight end O.J. Howard on a third-down pass and Ole Miss linebacker C.J. Johnson stepped in front of him for an easy interception.Two plays later, Kelly connected with the 6-foot-3 Treadwell over the 5-10 Jones for a 24-yard touchdown to give the Rebels a 43-24 advantage with 10 minutes remaining.The final turnover came on another Coker interception in the closing minutes when Ole Miss defensive end Marquis Haynes slipped by senior center Ryan Kelly and drilled Coker as he released, forcing the ball to sail into the arms of cornerback Tony Bridges for the game-sealing pick.“On a couple of Jake’s (interceptions), I think that they were playing zone, and I don’t think there was any miscommunication on his,” Saban said. “Look, we just have a lot of things that we need to do better.”last_img read more

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