FBI To Hold Diversity Recruiting Event In Albuquerque

first_imgIn particular, the FBI is looking for applicants who are fluent in a second language; have the ability to think critically; and come from a science/computer/technological background.  The Albuquerque FBI Division will hold a recruiting event next month to encourage members of underrepresented communities – especially women and minorities – to consider becoming Special Agents. FBI News: Pre-registration is required at: https://www.fbijobs.gov/career-paths/special-agents/diversity-agent-recruitment-program With the evolving threats that the United States faces, the Bureau has prioritized the need to hire those who are both highly skilled and representative of the wider community.  Attendees will travel at their own expense. Those unable to attend this event are encourage to apply for a special agent position by going to https://fbijobs.gov The FBI’s DAR event will allow potential applicants the opportunity to talk to special agents to learn more about job opportunities inside the Bureau. They will have the opportunity to hear about and ask questions related to: Life as a new agent (including training at the FBI Academy); Balancing a high-energy job with family; Typical day in the life of an FBI Special Agent (hint: there isn’t one!);Working cases that make a difference in your community; andOpportunities to travel the world. Although this event highlights diversity, all eligible candidates are welcome to attend. Special Agent applicants must be between the ages of 23-36; hold a minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree; have a minimum of two years of work experience (one year with a Master’s Degree) and be a U.S. citizen. The Diversity Agent Recruiting (DAR) event is 6-9 p.m., Aug. 20 in Albuquerque. “The FBI is stronger when it better represents the communities it serves,” said James Langenberg, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in New Mexico. “America looks to FBI Special Agents to protect them every day, and we want our Special Agents to look like America.”last_img read more

Read More →

News focus: Councils in need of counselling

first_imgGone are the days when local government lawyers, faced with swingeing budget cuts, could talk about nothing other than alternative business structures and shared service agreements. Now, you would be hard-pressed to find a council that is not part of a shared service agreement.As for ABSs, when I attended the Lawyers in Local Government weekend school a couple of years ago, solicitors were keen to know more about local authority-led ABSs, such as north London’s HB Public Law. Perhaps repeated warnings to think carefully about whether an ABS is the right vehicle to generate income struck a chord. At this year’s weekend school, held at the University of Warwick 10 days ago, there was little if any talk of the model.The financial challenge, meanwhile, remains formidable. A £2.2bn funding gap is forecast in social care by 2020; and the Department for Communities and Local Government budget has been cut by 60% since 2011/12. By 2020 that budget will have been pared to just £3.3bn – an 88% decline in the space of a decade.And then, of course, there is Brexit – what does this mean for councils? In the opening plenary session, Coventry City Council’s legal services manager Helen Lynch laid bare the scale of the challenge.‘How are we going to deal with the lack of opportunities currently being provided by EU funding and grant funding arrangements, which so much of us have benefited from over the last few years?’ she asked. ‘How are we going to continue to support businesses in the way we have done through EU funding?’The ‘cornerstone’ of Coventry’s own support for local small and medium-sized enterprises is the Europe-funded business support programme. Lynch said: ‘We need to think about what happens come December 2018, when the government guarantee for the EU to fund projects is expected to come to an end.’Her own council is establishing the Coventry and Warwickshire Duplex Fund, managed by Coventry and Warwickshire Reinvestment Trust, a local ‘community bank’ which lends to businesses that struggle to raise finance from banks.Coventry would contribute a loan of up to £2m towards the fund, which is supplemented by £5.4m in grant funding from central government. A cabinet report states that an important benefit of the proposal ‘is that grant funding which under normal circumstances would be used once, would instead form part of a 10-year programme of business support’.Warwickshire County Council is considering joining the fund, which Lynch hopes will support hundreds of SMEs and create more than 1,000 jobs. Any investment carries risks, she acknowledged, but successful businesses increase business rate receipts.Although the project is in its infancy, the fund highlights a move away from a traditional grant-funding model ‘to something that’s a little bit more innovative and longer-term’, Lynch said.Notwithstanding Brexit, local authorities already have to prepare for the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which comes into force in May 2018.The regulation will replace all data protection legislation in EU member states, including the UK’s Data Protection Act, without the need for further national legislation.After conducting an information governance survey of councils, the Information Commissioner’s Office concluded last month that ‘many have work to do’.A quarter of councils do not have a data protection officer, which public authorities are obliged to appoint under the regulation. More than 15% do not run data protection training for employees who process personal data. And a third do not conduct privacy impact assessments, which will be a legal requirement under the GDPR in certain circumstances.A quick straw poll at the weekend school’s data protection session showed that two-thirds of councils represented were actively planning for the GDPR. One in 10 was just starting to think about a plan.Public law specialist Jackie Gray, a partner at national firm Bond Dickinson, believes the data protection officer role lies within the legal department – not IT.‘Where DPOs have been in the IT team, they tend to look at compliance through the lens of IT. But it’s about everything – having contracts in place on data processors that meet all the conditions, where [the data is being processed], why, what’s our statutory function,’ Gray said. ‘The DPO needs to be someone who is either a lawyer or is well versed in information governance, but not someone who is necessarily in IT.’Wakefield Council has nominated its DPO – the council’s city solicitor, who is also the local authority’s monitoring officer. Legal services manager Liz Ogden told the session that other efforts to be GDPR-ready in Wakefield include conducting an ICO ‘stock-take’, and appointing and training information asset-owners.Areas where the council is doing well include communicating privacy information, Ogden said. Areas for improvement include individuals’ rights. ‘We have to look more closely at what the right to be forgotten really means,’ she said.As the financial noose tightens, meanwhile, the need to improve efficiency remains a top priority for in-house legal teams.Fiona Alderman, former chief legal officer at the London Borough of Brent, talked about achieving the right mix between in-house legal teams and external suppliers. Data from case management systems is crucial to see how much time is spent on various types of work; what the volumes of work are; and the duration of different processes.Alderman, now head of legal and constitutional services at the London Borough of Redbridge, said a lot of work is done in ‘workstreams’, such as debt recovery. At Redbridge, this is currently outsourced to private practice. But it is one area where local authorities may want to grow a team and bring some work back in-house. If the team has a lawyer who does a lot of insolvency work, they could also do the work for other councils, thus generating an income stream. Councils should also look at the Proceeds of Crime Act, including confiscation orders, which brought in £1.3m for Brent. Such orders were used, for instance, in planning enforcement – an ‘area of key political interest’.‘POCA is really worth looking at because it more than covered the costs of what we had to pay out,’ she added. Brent also built up its debt recovery team, which recovered £6m over three years. The message for council solicitors? Where there may be money to be found, go and find it.last_img read more

Read More →

Kobe Bryant: NBA Icon Mourned By Wife Vanessa, NBA Legends At Emotional Memorial

first_imgBasketball legends past and present united with thousands of Kobe Bryant fans as Bryant’s wife Vanessa paid a moving tribute to the transcendent NBA star and daughter Gianna at a memorial service in Los Angeles.Former Los Angeles Lakers shooting guard Bryant, 41, and Gianna, 13, were among nine people who died last month in a helicopter crash that sent shockwaves through the world of sports and beyond.Basketball legends Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, Shaquille O’Neal, Jerry West and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar alongside current stars including Stephen Curry, James Harden and Russell Westbrook were in attendance at the “Celebration of Life” memorial at the Staples Center, Bryant’s home arena during most of his storied, 20-season career with the Los Angeles Lakers.Celebrities including Jennifer Lopez, Kim Kardashian West and Kanye West were also in attendance.The event, which opened with a performance by singer Beyonce and a montage of Bryant’s basketball highlights, featured an emotional address by Bryant’s widow, Vanessa, who spoke about losing her 13-year-old daughter Gianna and the husband she called her “soulmate.”“He was mine. He was my everything,” she said of the man she began dating when she was 17.Vanessa Bryant recalled how Gianna loved to watch Disney movies with her sisters and enjoyed baking for her family.“Gianna Bryant is an amazingly sweet and gentle soul,” Vanessa told the crowd through tears. “Her smile was like sunshine. Her smile took up her entire face.”Bryant, 41, and the others were killed in the crash while en route to a youth basketball tournament at which Kobe was planning to coach his daughter and her teammates.Chicago Bulls legend Jordan, who won six NBA titles, helped Vanessa from the stage before also giving a tearful speech that referred to how often the two players were compared.“When Kobe Bryant died, a piece of me died,” said Jordan.“Everyone always wanted to talk about the comparisons between he and I but I just wanted to talk about Kobe.“Rest in peace, little brother.”O’Neal and Bryant, who was nicknamed ‘Black Mamba’, won three consecutive NBA titles together during an eight-year spell as Lakers team-mates from 1996 to 2004.“Kobe and I pushed one another to play some of the greatest basketball of all time,” said O’Neal.“Kobe and I always maintained a deep respect and love for one another.“Mamba, you were taken away from us way too soon, just know that we got your back, little brother.”Bryant, who joined the National Basketball Association at age 18 straight out of high school, was a five-time NBA champion and fourth-highest scorer in league history with 33,643 points.The Lakers, where he spent his entire career, retired both of his jersey numbers – 8 and 24, which hang from the arena’s rafters.During the annual NBA All-Star weekend three weeks after his death, the league announced its All-Star Game Most Valuable Player honor would be permanently named for the late superstar.RelatedHow Basketball Legend Kobe Bryant And His 13-year-old Daughter Died in Helicopter CrashJanuary 26, 2020In “BasketBall”Kobe Bryant’s Death “Shocking” – NBBFJanuary 27, 2020In “BasketBall”Kobe Bryant: NBA Icon’s Widow Sues Helicopter Company Over Fatal CrashFebruary 25, 2020In “BasketBall”last_img read more

Read More →