Gossens Bachman Architects wins national social responsibility award

first_imgGossens Bachman, Architects,Gossens Bachman Architects in conjunction with Housing Vermont and the Rockingham Community Area Land Trust were recently recognized by the John M. Clancy Award for Socially Responsible Housing for the transformation of the historical NAMCO Block in Windsor, Vermont.    The John M Clancy Award for Socially Responsible Housing was established in 2004. The intent of the John Clancy Award for Socially Responsible Housing is to recognize and encourage excellence in the planning,  design, construction and maintenance of socially responsible urban housing by honoring an organization, a group, or an individual who has been a major force behind one or more built housing developments characterized by excellence in planning, design and construction. The jury received submissions from across the country and said this about its selection process “In the end, we honored six projects, judging each to be an outstanding example of socially responsible housing. In every instance, the work was excellently handled from plan to completion. We recognized work that represents a mix of scales and is the result of fine contemporary thinking that elevates design beyond a basic reaction to a site’s past problems. These projects are evidence that affordable housing can be done well and can represent the urban form while bringing lovely, well-lit spaces to people who need it most.”   The NAMCO Block involved the rehabilitation of an 85,000 sq ft multi-family housing project on the National Register of Historic Places in downtown Windsor, VT.  Public perception plummeted over time and with poor building management and increased crime, the building became nearly uninhabitable to its residence and surrounding community.  In 2005, town officials compiled comprehensive records on the apartment complex; the Block’s level of violent and drug-related crime was double, and in some cases triple, those of the rest of the town. The 72 apartments, which held 10% of Windsor’s population, accounted for 36% of the town’s police calls for domestic violence, 35% of calls for drug activity, 32% of noise disturbances, 23% of child welfare calls, and 20% of reported assaults. In 2007 new owners wanted to renovate and revitalize the NAMCO Block and adjacent neighborhood. They envisioned a safe, healthy, mixed income ‘community within a community’.  The renovations included larger, completely reconfigured apartments that reduced the overall building density, additional community space, creation of two small pocket parks, the addition of a children’s play area, secure entrances, complete restoration of the rich exterior details and a new elevator and walkway system that makes all spaces accessible. This was all accomplished with the highest level of energy conservation and efficiency.  Last year the oil consumption went from 58,000 gallons to 19,000 gallons. The jury comments about the project.  “The entire neighborhood is revitalized by the renovation of this four-story brick apartment block, originally comprising nine identical buildings that contained 72 apartments. De-densification was thoughtful here, incorporating a plan that reduced the number of units to 58 and provided each with a south-facing kitchen to maximize light. The rental structure was changed from low income to mixed income and represents a small town’s theological choice to fix up a very large historical site and make it appealing to a wide range and percentage of its population.  The space feels very accessible, not just mechanically, but socially, incorporating very sensitive distribution of light and views. It’s rare to find a full block of buildings without some pronounced misstep, but this work is calm and handsome. The client, who could have done so much less, should be applauded.” Photos Credit: Gary Hall PhotographyGossens Bachman Architects  2.7.2012last_img read more

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Burlington mayor, business leaders endorse TIF

first_imgAt a press conference Friday, Burlington Mayor Bob Kiss, along with a group of community and business leaders, voiced his support for the Downtown TIF (Tax Increment Financing) question on Burlington’s March 6 Town Meeting Day Ballot. Kiss was joined by City Council President Bill Keogh; Tom Torti, President of the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce; Yves Bradley of the Planning Commission and local real estate agent; Melinda Moulton, CEO of Main Street Landing; Brenda Torpy, CEO of the Champlain Housing Trust; Melinda White-Bronson representing Vermont Interfaith Action; CEDO Director Larry Kupferman; and Charles Gionnani, Burlington resident and member of the Ward 2/3 Neighborhood Planning Assembly (NPA). All voiced strong support for the TIF question and the City’s efforts to utilize the Downtown TIF to attract private investment and finance public infrastructure. They cited the potential for development of market rate and affordable housing, expansion of the City’s tax base, making public improvements, and bringing new businesses and jobs to Burlington, among other things. The press conference was held in a parking lot that is part of a larger ‘superblock’ along Main Street which has been identified as an area ripe for use of TIF to make a redevelopment of the block possible. Mayor Kiss voiced support for the Downtown TIF and the TIF ballot question that has been shared across the political spectrum, among for-profit and non-profit developers, and a diverse group of stakeholders. ‘The City has worked diligently over the last several years to establish the downtown TIF district, in partnership with the City Council, local business community, and the Vermont Economic Progress Council, among many others,’ said Mayor Kiss. ‘Burlington has a successful track record of utilizing TIF to develop a once-desolate Waterfront into a vital and dynamic place for residents, businesses and visitors ‘ promoting business development, jobs, housing, and public access and infrastructure. The downtown TIF district is a critical element of the City’s economic development plans to attract new businesses and jobs while financing public infrastructure that benefits everyone in the community.  Public support of the TIF ballot question will allow the City to move forward with these plans.’ More information about the TIF ballot question can be found here: http://www.burlingtonvt.gov/CEDO/Business/Tax-Increment-Financing/Tax-In…(link is external).City of Burlington. 2.24.2012last_img read more

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Governor Shumlin announces $1.9 million in community development grants

first_imgGovernor Peter Shumlin announced today that the former Arthur’s department store, a landmark building in the center of Morristown, will be renovated into new commercial space and affordable apartments with the help of a $600,000 grant from the state. The downtown revitalization project was one of seven Vermont Community Development Program grants totaling nearly $2 million awarded by Commerce and Community Development Secretary Lawrence Miller at a ceremony in Morristown.  The building that was once home to Arthur’s has been vacant since its owners retired.  ‘This funding will help restore an historic building and economic activity in the heart of downtown,’said Gov. Shumlin.  ‘It will also create 18 units of much needed affordable housing.   This is just one of several grants that will bring jobs and new homes to communities across the state.’  ‘In addition to helping municipalities meet the needs of their residents, VCDP grants often serve as building blocks for community revitalization,’said Secretary Miller.  ‘Morristown, with the support of the Vermont Council on Rural Development, prioritized its goals for the future, including the redevelopment of downtown buildings.  Our agency is pleased to support its goals with this funding.  Building stronger communities is central to our mission.’  Morristown will subgrant the funds to Housing Vermont and the Lamoille Housing Partnership which will develop and manage 18 new apartments for low and moderate-income Vermonters on the upper floors of the building.  Commercial space will be created on the street level. Other grants announced at the ceremony include $325,000 to the Town of Brattleboro for a loan to Carbon Harvest, which will complete the final fit-up of its agricultural facility and create nine new jobs.   The project will enable Carbon Harvest to implement year-round growing systems and permanent employment.  Located at the closed Windham Solid Waste Management landfill, the facility uses waste heat from on-site methane fueled combined heat and power to warm its greenhouse and aquaculture facilities. The Town of Ludlow and Housing Trust of Rutland County were awarded $500,000 for infrastructure improvements to the Tuckerville Mobile Home Park.  In addition, the Town of St. Johnsbury received $300,000 that it will loan to the Gilman Housing Trust for the substantial rehabilitation of 24 affordable apartments.  Other grant recipients include the Town of Westminster, which will loan $150,000 to the Windham & Windsor Housing Trust for the renovation of multi-family residential building increasing the total number of affordable units to six.  The City of Barre was awarded a $30,000 planning grant to complete work related to the Merchants Row Redevelopment Project and the Town of Jericho received a grant of $28,000 to develop plans for making its historic library fully compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act accessibility requirements. The Vermont Community Development Program money comes from the approximately $7 million Vermont receives annually in Community Development Block Grant funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which must be used principally to benefit persons of low and moderate income. The awards leverage more than $13 million in other funds from private and public sources. The state awards the competitive grants based on recommendations of the Vermont Community Development Board and approval of Secretary Miller. For information about the Vermont Community Development Program, please see the Agency of Commerce and Community Development website at: http://accd.vermont.gov/strong_communities(link is external) MunicipalityVCDP Funds AwardedOther ResourcesBrief DescriptionTown of Brattleboro$325,000 $237,500 Loan to Brattleboro Carbon Harvest to help complete the final fit-up of its agricultural facility, allowing Brattleboro Carbon Harvest to have year-round integrated growing systems and permanent employment. The project will create at least nine new full-time permanent positions, 6 of which will be filled by low and moderate income individuals. The facility sits on the closed Windham Solid Waste Management landfill site.  Waste heat from the on-site methane fueled combined heat and power plant heats the greenhouse and aquaculture facilities.  Town of Ludlow$500,000 $596,702 Subgrant to The Housing Trust of Rutland County to be used toward the rehabilitation of Tuckerville Mobile Home Park.  The 23 unit park is in need of infrastructure repairs including replacement of several failed or failing septic systems and aging water pipes.  In addition, the application proposes to install 3 pads on vacant lots that can accommodate newer mobile homes and to do repairs to roads.Town of Morristown$600,000 $3,903,089 Deferred loan to Arthur’s Main Street Housing Limited Partnership, formed by Housing Vermont and Lamoille Housing Partnership, to rehabilitate the former Arthur’s Department Store property at 53-63 Lower Main Street into 18 units of rental housing on the second and third floors.  As part of the larger project, commercial space, will be developed on the street level.Town of St. Johnsbury$300,000 $7,318,791 Deferred loan to Gilman Housing Trust, Inc. to substantially rehabilitate four affordable multifamily properties in the Town of St. Johnsbury. The four properties, located at: 426 Summer Street, 606 Summer Street; 390 Portland Avenue; and 20 Cote Court, currently total 22 apartment units. When complete the total units will increase to 24. Rental subsidies from Rural Development and the Vermont State Housing Authority will solidify affordability of all 24 apartments.Town of Westminster$150,000 $1,203,873 Deferred loan to Windham-Windsor Housing Trust to substantially rehabilitate one multi-family property in North Westminster. Renovations will increase the apartments from 4 to 6, serving 6 low and moderate income households. City of Barre$30,000 $12,400 Grant to develop the construction documents necessary to move the Merchants Row Redevelopment Project forward to implementation.Town of Jericho$28,000 $7,507 Grant to Town to conduct a feasibility study on making the historic Town Library fully ADA compliant.  Governor’s office 7.27.2012last_img read more

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Copley Hospital one of top 50 hospitals in New England rated by patients

first_imgCopley Health Systems,Related Company: Copley Hospital, IncCopley Hospital is one of New England’s top 50 hospitals based on patient satisfaction according to a recent report published by GoLocalProv. Copley was rated #33 of New England’s Best Hospitals, recognized for its “stellar communication.”For their first annual ranking of New England Hospitals Rated by Patients, GoLocal analyzed results from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems, also known as HCAHPS Survey. The report was based on more than 50,000 patient surveys in 176 hospitals in New England. Highlights of Copley’s report include 87% of patients who said their doctors communicated well, and 85% of patients who said their nurses did.  “We are pleased to learn of the ranking. Copley has an exceptional team of clinicians and employees that go to great lengths to provide the highest quality of care – care our patients deserve and expect every day,” states Copley Hospital President Mel Patashnick.  The survey focused on eight key measures including how well doctors and nurses communicate, responsiveness of hospital staff to the needs of the patient, how well the patients’ pain is controlled, and the cleanliness and quietness of the hospital environment.The HCAHPS is a standardized survey instrument and data collection methodology that has been used since 2006 to measure patients’ perspective on hospital care. It was created by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).patient’s perspective of hospital care.Copley has been using patient surveys for many years with surveying and analytic assistance from Press Ganey Associates. These surveys allow patients to communicate their hospital experience, while allowing the hospital to identify areas that need improvement. “Continuing to offer high quality care means you are always trying to do better,” says Patashnick. He explains that when an area is identified as needing improvement,  the hospital’s Quality Management Department works with the department, or service areas, to develop a plan of action that addresses the concern.  “These improvement projects would not be possible without our patients communicating their experience to us through surveys like the HCAHPS,” Patashnick said.      Copley was one of four Vermont Hospitals making the Top 50 list. The other hospital were Southwestern Vermont Medical Center, Mt. Ascutney, and Grace Cottage. The complete GoLocal report can be found at: http://www.golocalprov.com/news/chart-new-englands-best-hospitals-rated-…(link is external). Copley Hospital is greater Lamoille County’s non-profit community hospital and one of the area’s largest employers. Copley’s core services include:  women’s and children’s health services, emergency services, general surgery, orthopedics, and diagnostic services including imaging and labs, along with access to a variety of medical specialists including cardiology, oncology, sleep medicine, and urology on its campus in Morrisville. Visit www.copleyvt.org(link is external) or call 802-888-8888 for more information.last_img read more

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LCC March Ripples E-news: Bloated farm bill, rebuilding infrastructure

first_imgFriday Bird Walks8 – 9 AMat Burlington’s Oakledge Park every Friday in MayCelebrate spring on weekly, free bird walks with the Lake Champlain Committee (LCC). Pick up tips to recognize the avian creatures that pass through and inhabit our region and learn how they rely on the lake. Read more…(link is external) Lake Champlain CommitteeMarch Ripples E-news The Farm Bill – A Big Bloated Sprawling MessMarion Nestle(link is external), Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University, decided to teach a course on the Farm Bill. The Farm Bill is the primary agricultural and food policy tool for the United States. Read more…(link is external) April Stools’ Day -St. AlbansApril 1, 10 AM – Noonat Taylor Park in St. AlbansHelp scoop the poop on April Stools’ Day! Meet for “doo-ty” at the fountain at the southwest corner of the park off of Main Street. Pet poop that’s not picked up sends nutrients and bacteria into our waterways. Join a community effort to clean up parks, sidewalks and trails to protect our waters. Read more…(link is external) Lake Look: How did we get where we are?Lake Champlain does not meet water quality standards. Every year, blue-green algae blooms plague northeastern bays and pop up in other places around the lake. Conditions have sparked outrage and led to new regulations on farms, municipalities, and developers. Read more…(link is external) Upcoming Events Flint, MI – A Call to Rebuild AmericaWe take clean drinking water for granted, but recent problems in Flint, Michigan are a reminder of how precious it really is. It has only been about 100 years that we could trust the water coming from taps to not make us sick, a threat many parts of the world still face. Read more…(link is external) Twenty New Fish Species Found in AustraliaThere’s so much about the natural world we still don’t know. Field biologists in Australia(link is external) discovered twenty new species of fish in nine months of fieldwork between 2012 and 2014. They sampled just 17 rivers in the province of Kimberley, a region in northwestern Australia on the Indian Ocean. Read more…(link is external) Nature Note – Pogo sticking on the water surfaceThe world is a different place when you’re small. As an example, consider how insects interact with the surface tension of water compared to a person. Surface tension is the property of the surface of a liquid that allows it to resist an external force, due to the cohesive nature of its molecules. Read more…(link is external) Wanted: Photos and Tales from the TrailWe’re at work on the 2016 edition of the Trail guide and other Trail promotional materials. If you have pictures and stories from your 2015 water outings that you haven’t shared yet, we’d love to see and hear them. Read more…(link is external) Additional AprilStools’ DaysStay tuned for additional clean-up days in April and May. Contact LCC to help organize a clean-up in your community or initiate some spring cleaning on your own. Whenever you have time, head out to your favorite park, trail or neighborhood with gloves, plastic bags and a sturdy trowel and help scoop the poop.  Read more…(link is external) PBDE Levels Increase in Lake Erie SmallmouthPolybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that were commonly used in furniture, electronics, construction materials and textiles. Production of the chemicals was discontinued in 2013, yet they persist in the environment. Read more…(link is external) Cat Walk for WaterApril 13, 7 PMat ArtsRiot in BurlingtonEco-conscious couture will rock the runway and raise funds for LCC’s water work!Join in a fun night of music, fashion and hair with flair in support of a good cause at AVEDA’s Catwalk for Water on Wednesday, April 13, at Arts Riot, 400 Pine Street in Burlington. Doors open at 6 PM and the cat walk starts at 7 PM. Tickets are $10 in advance (at O’briens Aveda Institutes and online)(link is external) and $15 at the door. Read more…(link is external) Water News from Near and Far SolarBees Fail to Prevent Algae Blooms in North Carolina LakePeople are always searching for engineered solutions to prevent blue-green algae blooms. One such idea is installation of solar powered water circulators, commercially called SolarBees. The idea is that circulating water will prevent the development of blooms. Read more…(link is external) Supreme Court Refuses to Hear Chesapeake Clean-up ChallengeFor five years the Farm Bureau has been seeking to block the implementation of an ambitious Chesapeake Bay clean-up effort developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). They have argued that EPA exceeded its authority in developing the plan and that clean-up efforts needed to be left to the states. Read more…(link is external) Ag Rules on HoldThe Vermont Agency of Agriculture has requested a delay(link is external) in up-dating their pollution control rules for agriculture. The up-date is required under Act 64, the water quality bill passed by the Vermont legislature in 2015. Read more…(link is external) Record Low Levels of Arctic Sea IceArctic sea ice(link is external) usually hits its maximum around mid-March. For the second year in a row, that maximum was smaller. The peak was 5,000 square miles smaller than last year’s low maximum and 431,000 square miles lower than the average peak between 1981 and 2010. Read more…(link is external) LCC Lake Champlain Committee The Vermont Agency of Agriculture has requested a delay(link is external) in up-dating their pollution control rules for agriculture. The up-date is required under Act 64, the water quality bill passed by the Vermont legislature in 2015. Act 64 called for the Agency to finalize the rules by July 1, 2016. The Agency wants that date pushed back until September.The Agency released a first draft of the rules last October and a second draft in February, so extensive work has already gone into preparing them. The Agency argues that the February draft has generated additional comments that they need time to address. LCC and other groups have provided extensive comments(link is external) to help guide development and implementation of the rules.LCC expressed disappointment in the request. “We need strong regulations now,” said Executive Director Lori Fisher. “The delay means another growing season will pass before agriculture adopts better practices to protect water quality.”last_img read more

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Community College of Vermont to hold 49th Commencement on June 4 in Northfield

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The Community College of Vermont will hold its 49th commencement ceremony at Norwich University’s Shapiro Field House on June 4, 2016. The ceremony will begin at 2 pm. This year, over 500 students from across the state will be awarded associate degrees. Students representing all 14 Vermont counties will be graduating along with students from 12 other states and 18 countries. Also among the graduates are 41 veterans and active duty military. The youngest graduate is 17 and the oldest is 66.The College is pleased to announce that Mark Redmond, executive director of Spectrum Youth and Family Services will deliver this year’s commencement address. Since 2003, Redmond has led Spectrum, which works to empower teenagers, young adults, and their families to make and sustain positive changes through prevention, intervention, and life skills services. In addition to his work at Spectrum, Redmond is a storyteller, a writer for The Huffington Post, and the author of The Goodness Within: Reaching out to Troubled Teens with Love and Compassion.CCV graduation 2013 with Governor Shumlin.The student speaker for the 2016 commencement is CCV-Upper Valley student Ashley M. Andreas. Andreas grew up in Pennsylvania and attended Milton Hershey School and Millersville University. After traveling and having her daughter Daliah, she returned to school at CCV in order to gain the tools necessary to become a leader. Andreas has become an active member of the Community of Student Representatives and a work-study, and earned the 2015 Leadership Scholarship for the Upper Valley center. Passionate about politics, she is on the executive committee of a political group that helps young people participate in local government and organizes voter registration drives for students. She is currently running for House of Representatives in White River Junction. Andreas is graduating with an A.S. in Business and plans to finish her second A.S. in Environmental Science at CCV in Spring 2017.Tom Stearns of Wolcott will receive the 2016 Community Service Award. Stearns is passionate about Vermont’s agricultural community. He is the founder and head seedsman of High Mowing Organic Seeds, and is also involved with the Center for an Agricultural Economy and Slow Money Vermont. Stearns recently won the Vermont Small Business Person of the Year award from the U.S. Small Business Administration.Brad Houk of Bellows Falls will receive the 2016 Faculty Community Service Award. Houk has many fascinating experiences to his credit, including writing a thesis based on a bicycle journey through China, living in the Navajo nation, performing with a mime theater company, and founding a wrestling magazine. He currently teaches at Green Mountain Union High School, Riverside Middle School, and CCV, where he uses mapping to integrate place-based experiential learning with community engagement and service-learning to inspire students, improve student retention, and change public policy.CCV President Joyce Judy will officiate the event and members of the Vermont State Colleges Board of Trustees will be in attendance.CCV is Vermont’s second largest college, serving over 7,000 students each semester.  With 12 locations and extensive online learning options, our students don’t have to travel far from their communities to access our degree and certificate programs, workforce, secondary and continuing education opportunities, and academic and veterans support services.last_img read more

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Weekly unemployment claims up over 700

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Weekly unemployment claims rose last week. Claims have been rising this fall with only a brief respite, while running even year-to-year. Among industrial sectors, Manufacturing and Construction claims were both up for the week. Looking ahead, the holidays typically produce wild swings in unemployment claims, because of an increase in hiring in the Service sector, from retail to delivery-related businesses, and then an abrupt round of layoffs after Christmas.For the week of November 5, 2016, there were 733 claims, up 189 from the previous week’s total and 29 more than than they were a year ago.Altogether 3,790 new and continuing claims were filed, an increase of 294 from a week ago, but 183 fewer than a year ago.The Department processed 0 First Tier claims for benefits under Emergency Unemployment Compensation, 2008 (EUC08).Vermont’s unemployment rate remained at 3.3 percent in September, as the labor force and total employment decreased, along with a small increase in the number of unemployed. SEE STORY.RELATED: PAI: Jobs increase, but educational and digital divides persistThe Unemployment Weekly Report can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/(link is external). Previously released Unemployment Weekly Reports and other UI reports can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/lmipub.htm#uc(link is external)NOTE: Employment (nonfarm payroll) – A count of all persons who worked full- or part-time or received pay from a nonagricultural employer for any part of the pay period which included the 12th of the month. Because this count comes from a survey of employers, persons who work for two different companies would be counted twice. Therefore, nonfarm payroll employment is really a count of the number of jobs, rather than the number of persons employed. Persons may receive pay from a job if they are temporarily absent due to illness, bad weather, vacation, or labor-management dispute. This count is based on where the jobs are located, regardless of where the workers reside, and is therefore sometimes referred to as employment “by place of work.” Nonfarm payroll employment data are collected and compiled based on the Current Employment Statistics (CES) survey, conducted by the Vermont Department of Labor. This count was formerly referred to as nonagricultural wage and salary employment.last_img read more

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FreshTracks Capital increases support of THINKMD in recent financing round

first_imgFreshTracks Capital LP,THINKMD,Vermont Business Magazine FreshTracks Capital III, LP has further invested in Burlington-based THINKMD, a registered Vermont Benefit Corporation. THINKMD is a global healthcare innovation company founded by University of Vermont Medical Center pediatricians Barry Finette and Barry Heath.  THINKMD’s first product, MEDSINC, is a point-of-care clinical assessment tool that enables a minimally-skilled user to gather patient information, assess the severity of an illness, and provide approved triage and treatment recommendations. MEDSINC increases healthcare capacity by empowering users worldwide to play a more active role in the healthcare of those they serve. The platform has been tested alongside world-class partners on four continents and will soon be deployed in the company’s first commercial rollout. THINKMD first began working with FreshTracks in 2015 when co-founder and Managing Director, Cairn Cross coached Barry Finette through the LaunchVT Business Pitch competition.  Later that year, FreshTracks became an early investor in the company and has worked with the team providing strategic advice and input on an ongoing basis since then. “With 39 companies added to our portfolio during the past 17 years, we are continually seeking to invest in businesses that have a meaningful and positive impact not only on Vermont, but on the rest of the world”, said Cairn Cross, “We believe that THINKMD will change the way healthcare is delivered globally, and that the company is positioned to grow and prosper here in our state while creating meaningful high-paying jobs for Vermonters.” “As our largest investor to date, FreshTracks has been an invaluable local partner to THINKMD in our startup phase,” said THINKMD founder, Barry Finette. “As we continue to achieve milestones and scale, we look forward to continued strategic and advisory support from the FreshTracks team. FreshTracks joins strategic investor DAI in this new round of capital.  Since 1970, DAI has worked in more than 150 countries delivering results across the spectrum of international development contexts. DAI tackles fundamental social and economic development problems caused by inefficient markets, ineffective governance, and instability and works with a wide range of clients, including national and local governments, bilateral and multilateral donors, private corporations, and philanthropies. About FreshTracks CapitalFreshTracks Capital is a Vermont-focused investment fund that uses venture capital to generate positive economic, social, environmental and community impacts.  Across its four funds, totaling more than $45 million, FreshTracks has invested in 39 companies and generated hundreds of high-paying jobs in various Vermont business sectors including Software, Internet & Mobile Technologies, Consumer Products, Food and Beverage, Healthcare IT & Services, High-Tech Manufacturing, Energy Efficiency, Solar, and Green Technologies. FreshTracks is deeply involved in the local innovation economy, and hosts two flagship events for entrepreneurs and investors, including Peak Pitch, where entrepreneurs pitch their ideas to investors during a day of skiing, and Road Pitch, a state-wide week-long motorcycle tour for investors to field new business pitches in 10 communities around Vermont.  The firm was founded in 2000 by Cairn Cross and Charlie Kireker, and is currently managed by General Partners Cairn Cross, Lee Bouyea and T.J. Whalen.  FreshTracks is actively investing out of its newly launched fund, FreshTracks Capital IV.     Learn more at: www.freshtrackscap.com(link is external)  About THINKMDTHINKMD is a global healthcare innovation company focused on developing solutions that expand quality healthcare coverage for everyone, everywhere. Founded by two pediatricians, the THINKMD team combines expertise in software development, public and global health, international business and data analytics. Leveraging evidence-based medicine and next-generation technology, THINKMD works to increase healthcare capacity, evolve healthcare delivery, and collect and analyze critical public health data that will improve clinical outcomes, healthcare management, and decision making globally. THINKMD is a registered benefit corporation. Learn more at: www.thinkmd.org(link is external).Source: Shelburne, Vermont: FreshTracks Capital 2.14.2017last_img read more

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Rescue crews search Lake Champlain for missing man near Rouses Point Bridge

first_imgVermont State Police Wednesday evening at about 7 p.m., search crews recovered a body from Lake Champlain in Vermont near the Rouses Point Bridge. The body, preliminarily identified as that of Andrew Lynch, 42, of St Albans, will be transported to the Chief Medical Examiner’s Office in Burlington for an autopsy to determine cause and manner of death. Emergency crews including the Vermont State Police had been searching for the missing man in Lake Champlain near the Rouses Point Bridge between Alburgh and New York state since Tuesday. He was seen going into the water in the vicinity of the bridge.Agencies assisting the Vermont State Police in the search include the Grand Isle County Sheriff’s Department and the U.S. Border Patrol, which has provided a helicopter.***Update 12:45 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018***Search efforts resumed at about noon Wednesday following dangerous wind conditions on Lake Champlain during the morning that kept emergency responders on shore. Crews and boats from the Vermont State Police are being joined today by vessels from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Quebec Provincial Police, and divers from the New York State Police. Alburgh Rescue also is on scene.The search area is from the Rouses Point Bridge north, due to conditions including the wind and water currents.The subject of the search is identified as Andrew Lynch, 42, of St. Albans. He was reported missing on Tuesday morning, Aug. 21, 2018, by his family. His car was located in a parking area on the Vermont side of the bridge, and Mr. Lynch is believed to have entered the water in the vicinity of the bridge.***Update 9:15 p.m. Tuesday***Search efforts have been suspended for the night. Crews are scheduled to return to the search area at about 9 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018. ***Update 2:10 p.m. Tuesday***Lt. Maurice Lamothe will be available for a media briefing at 2:30 p.m. on the east side of the Rouses Point bridge.Anyone who might have a sighting of the individual or who has information about the incident is asked to call the state police’s St. Albans Barracks at 802-524-5993.last_img read more

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Scott appoints Michael Harrington as Labor Commissioner

first_imgHarrington has been serving as interim commissioner of the Department of Labor Vermont Business Magazine Governor Phil Scott today announced he has appointed Michael Harrington as commissioner of the Vermont Department of Labor.“Mike’s dedication to, and effort on behalf of, Vermonters through unprecedented and incredibly difficult times is the type of service and determination I expect from leaders in our administration,” Governor Scott said. “His experience with the Department will provide valuable consistency and stability as we continue to navigate and recover from the economic impacts of this pandemic.”Harrington was appointed by Governor Scott as deputy commissioner of Labor in January 2017 and has served as interim commissioner since September 2019.“I’m thankful for the opportunity to continue the work of the Department to build a stronger workforce in Vermont while we focus on managing the current and emerging challenges we face as a result of COVID-19,” Harrington said.Prior to his service to the state of Vermont, Harrington, a native of Bennington, served as the economic and community development director for the Town of Bennington. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the State University of New York, College at Plattsburgh.Harrington resides in Northfield with his family.Source: Governor 6.5.2020last_img read more

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