Argonaut updates lighter, fatter, domestically sourced carbon Disc Road Bike

first_imgThe carbon Disc Road Bike has been one of Argonaut’s most popular bikes since its origins under the auspices of a gravel bike back at NAHBS in 2014. Since then, disc brakes on the road have become less a compromise and more of the mainstream solution. So Argonaut have overhauled the Disc Road Bike to fit fatter tires, updated to the most current axle & brake standards, and reworked the bike’s custom layups.New custom carbon Argonaut Disc Road BikeUpdating the Disc Road Bike required Argonaut to step back from their popular bike and see how they could reoptimize how they craft the disc brake road bike to take on any road surface. Of course with the trend of wider road tires, that was a good place to start. But they also looked at how the built each bike by hand one-at-a-time from US-sourced carbon fiber on their own proprietary tooling in their Oregon workshop. At the same time they decided to roll the bike out to a “Test Flight” series down in California where riders could try the revamped bike out.What’s new in the Argonaut Disc Road Bike?As component makers have caught up with riders, road disc has cemented itself with new standards. So of course the new Disc Road Bike moves over to thru-axles and flat mount disc brake calipers at both ends. It isn’t only simple 12mm axles, though. Argonaut has added new molded carbon dropouts designed for Mavic Speed Release thru-axles, front & rear.While the bike remains fully custom in both rider-tuned layup & geometry, Argonaut has reshaped & refined their base carbon layup of the bike to better optimize it for the asymmetric loading of disc braking. They say that has helped them be more efficient in overall weight. But the bigger benefit seems a more balanced ride which allows them more ability to tailor the ride to each rider’s weight, power & riding style.Everyone wants more tire clearance, so Argonaut covered that too. The new Disc Road Bike now has ample space for up to a 30c tire (actual measurements up to 32mm wide) with the still short 412mm chainstays.The bike also gets new internal brake routing that also works with electronic wiring and includes an internal Di2 junction box.Frame details & complete bike specThe custom Road Disc Bike frame uses a T47 bottom bracket, a direct mount rear derailleur, and gets paired with a matching ENVE Road Disc fork (also with Mavic Speed Release.)If you are looking to build a complete bike up with the custom frame, Argonaut with sell a bike with a complete Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 hydraulic groupset for $15,300. That includes a set of ENVE 3.4 disc wheels set up tubeless with Schwalbe Pro One tires, plus a ENVE carbon stem, bar, 27.2 seatpost, and a Chris King BB. Besides lightening your wallet, a 54cm frame claims a weight of just 15.7lb/7.1kg complete with pedals and bottle cages.Argonaut Test Flight programNow, if you want to take a spin on one before you skip a year’s worth of rent payments, the Argonaut Test Flight Program is your ticket. They are starting with events in the San Francisco area where you can test ride a bike in your size to help determine the ride character you are looking for. There will also be fitting opportunities, and a chance to sit down and discuss how Argonaut can tailored a bike to you. Reserve a slot at Argonaut’s Flight Test site.ArgonautCycles.comlast_img read more

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25th Mooloolaba Triathlon named Australian Championship

first_imgOne of the biggest mass participation Olympic distance triathlons in the world, the Mooloolaba Triathlon turns 25 next year. A stalwart on the Australian triathlon calendar since 1993, the 25th edition of the race will carry the added honour of being the Australian Standard Distance Championship.Held next year from 10-12 March along the picturesque Mooloolaba Esplanade, the Mooloolaba Triathlon Festival is recognised as the second largest Olympic Distance Triathlon event in Australia, behind the Noosa triathlon, which last year was named the world’s largest.Originally operated by USM Events one of Australia’s leading event management companies, in February 2012 USM Events was acquired by IRONMAN brand owner World Triathlon Corporation (WTC) – meaning that the multisport festivals at Noosa, Cairns and Mooloolaba are part of the IRONMAN operation under newly formed entity Wanda Sports.As the Australian Championship, the Mooloolaba Triathlon will also carry double qualifying points for selection as part of Team Australia at the 2017 Age Group World Champs which in Rotterdam, Netherlands.“It is fitting that this iconic event will celebrate its 25th birthday with the honour of being an Australian title,” said IRONMAN Oceania Managing Director David Beeche. “The Mooloolaba Triathlon is such an iconic event, and so closely intertwined within the history of triathlon in Australia.”The Mooloolaba Triathlon is the centrepiece of the three-day Mooloolaba Triathlon Festival, which celebrates the best of the Australian summer lifestyle, at one of the world’s premier beachside resort locations. Mooloolaba will become race six of Triathlon Australia’s eight race qualifying series for the 2017 Age Group World Championship. In 2018 the age group world championship will be hosted on the Gold Coast.“We’re very proud and excited to be hosting another Australian Championship race in Queensland, and there is none more fitting than the iconic Mooloolaba Triathlon,” said Triathlon Australia CEO Miles Stewart. “Obviously it holds a special place in my heart, and a race I won three times, but it has hosted thousands of Australian athletes since 1993 and grown into the world renowned multi-sport festival it is today.”Stewart also went on to praise the efforts of the event organisers, IRONMAN Oceania, who have ‘been instrumental in delivering world class events’.In addition to attracting international and Australian elite sportsmen and women, the Mooloolaba Triathlon Festival provides a host of events that include: the Age Group Triathlon, Asics Twilight 5km Run, the Mooloolaba 1km Ocean Swim, Mooloolaba Superkidz Triathlon, Mooloolaba Sport & Lifestyle Expo, ‘plenty of entertainment and much more’.www.ap.ironman.com Relatedlast_img read more

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What can we learn from Gen Y’s view of money?

first_imgRecently, Fidelity released another survey about millennials and money. They found that 47 percent of us are saving for retirement. To me, that stat was really telling about our generation’s view of personal finance, and it’s not unlike other findings. When TIME wrote about the survey, they reported:“Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies found that 71% of millennials eligible for a 401(k) plan participate and that 70% of millennials began saving at an average age of 22. By way of comparison, Boomers started saving at an average age of 35.”It is self-reported data, sure. But it seems hard to deny that there is a heightened, post-recession interest in finance and our economy. We’re pushing for every manner of financial education — in schools and on the Internet. Personal finance has become an increasingly popular niche in the blogosphere. Even Paul Allen, co-founder of Microsoft, is involved in the production of movies designed to explain how our economy works. To me, it’s harder to believe there wouldn’t be some sort of new-found interest in personal finance after the Great Recession.Another finding from Fidelity’s poll people found interesting: When asked whom they trust most for information on money matters, 33 percent of millennials say they trust their parents, but 1 in 4 (23 percent) say they trust no one. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrcenter_img continue reading »last_img read more

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Longtime public defender takes his act to Afghanistan

first_img Longtime public defender takes his act to Afghanistan Associate Editor A s an experienced public defender, Rick Parker knows the power of a well-made decision. It’s why he’s confident that his recent choice to step down as the Eighth Judicial Circuit public defender is the right one. Yet with over 30 years of service to the Eighth Circuit on his résumé, Parker has no plans to retire. Instead, this month, he’ll get on a plane to Afghanistan, where he has accepted a job with PAE, Inc., a private firm working with the U.S. State Department.“This may sound silly, but it really looked like they were looking for me,” said Parker of the PAE job description that first got his attention. “They were looking for experienced criminal defenders, and all the experience they were looking for, I had done.”Parker, a 1972 graduate of the University of Florida College of Law, had already decided to retire from state government in time for the 2012 elections. Doing so, he thought, would give others interested in serving the time to pursue the open seat. He assumed it would take at least that long to find other work that might interest him.That all changed in May, when Parker attended a Florida Public Defender Association meeting. Sheldon Gusky, executive director of the PDA, announced job openings with PAE, and although Parker wasn’t familiar with the company, his interest was piqued.Weeks earlier, one of Parker’s investigators, former Levy County Deputy Bobby Schultz, had shared details with Parker of his own stint in Afghanistan — two one-year terms as a contractor. Positions for attorneys, Schultz had told Parker, were often available.“I started looking online, but I was unable to find any attorney work there in my initial searches,” said Parker. “Trying to do something to help those people in that part of the world made sense to me. I wasn’t actively thinking about anything particular, but the seeds had been planted.”At the PDA meeting, Parker was finally given the opportunity he had spent weeks searching for online. All he had to do was convince his wife that this job — nearly 8,000 miles from their home in Gainesville — was the right one for him.“She looked through it all, then looked at me and asked, ‘When does the plane leave?’” Parker said.With his wife’s blessing, Parker began the laborious application process, including a State Department security screening, drug testing, a complete physical, and various blood tests. As each prerequisite was checked off the list, the reality of Parker’s decision began to hit him.“I knew I could begin working for people who desperately needed help,” said Parker.In late September, he received a letter from PAE confirming that he had been approved for the contract. The process moved quickly, and Parker’s letter of resignation to Gov. Charlie Crist solidified the decision. His retirement is effective November 30. He’s unsure of who will replace him, but he has made his recommendation clear.“I recommended Assistant Public Defender Stacy Scott, and I sent a letter to the governor making that recommendation,” said Parker. “But that decision is exclusively the governor’s.”Parker’s new position in Afghanistan required extensive criminal defense experience, but his new job will be drastically different from the one he’s held for 26 years. He’ll join 65 U.S. attorneys in nation-building and mentoring and training Afghan nationals. It’s a job Parker insists he’s ready for.“It’ll hopefully be a lot less politics,” said Parker. “What I’ve done for a number of years for the PDA is represent all 20 public defenders in the executive and legislative branches, and most recently I was focusing on appropriations. In Afghanistan, I may be working in the capital doing policy-level things, but not budget and financing.”His contract with PAE is for one year, though Parker is hopeful it might last up to three. Parker’s wife and two children — both are law students in Florida and New York — placed some restrictions on his impending departure.The first requires his presence at his son’s graduation from the University of Florida College of Law in May, which Parker has already made plans to attend. In addition, Parker and his wife have scheduled trips to Rome and Paris, making the distance between them a little easier to bear.“Travel was definitely one of the inducements for me to take the job,” said Parker.As his time as public defender and Gainesville resident comes to a close, Parker knows the decision he’s made is the right one, and he’s ready to take the next step.“My reaction has been that once the decision was made, the sooner I can get over there, the better,” said Parker. “I’m just really anxious to get going with it. I’m anxious to get over there.“I remember the day I had my physical — it was more than just your typical doctor’s visit. Afterward my physician, who was kind of just worn out from the whole process, said, ‘You’re superman; you can do anything!’”Parker hopes that’s the case. November 15, 2010 Annie Butterworth Jones Associate Editor Regular News Longtime public defender takes his act to Afghanistanlast_img read more

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FAWL nominates its executive committee officers

first_img FAWL nominates its executive committee officers April 15, 2013 Regular News FAWL nominates its executive committee officerscenter_img The Florida Association for Women Lawyers has announced its slate of officers for its 2013-2014 Executive Committee.The slate was approved by the current FAWL Board of Directors in March and will be voted at FAWL’s 2013 Annual Meeting in Boca Raton on June 26-27.The slate of officers put forth include:* President Brittany Maxey of the Pinellas County Association for Women Lawyers.* Immediate Past President Laura K. Wendell of Miami-Dade FAWL.* President-elect Robin Bresky, of the South Palm Beach County FAWL.* Treasurer Robyn Featherston of the Pinellas County Association for Women Lawyers.* Secretary Stefanie Moon of the Broward County Women Lawyers.* Membership Director Kristin Norse of the Hillsborough Association for Women Lawyers.* Legislative Director Jennifer Sullivan Davis of the Tallahassee Women Lawyers.* Development Director Stephanie Harriett of the Jacksonville Women Lawyers Association.* Journal Editor Kathryn Lancaster of the Clara Gehan Association for Women Lawyers.last_img read more

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Food Safety Scan for Apr 17, 2018

first_imgUSDA study finds several factors fueling rise in food recallsThe average yearly number of food recalls increased from 2004 to 2013, probably because of several factors, including an increase in food volume sold and improvements in pathogen detection technology, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service reported yesterday.Food recalls averaged 304 per year from 2004 to 2008 but rose to an average of 676 from 2009 to 2013, according to the report. Other factors that might partially explain the significant increase in food recalls include an increase in regulatory oversight and enforcement in the wake of two major food policy laws passed by Congress: the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act and the Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act.The analysis of six food categories found that, except for nut products, the most common reason that triggered recalls was failure to declare major food allergens. The most common reason for nut product recalls was possible Salmonella contamination. Though recall numbers rose for all food categories, the increase was statistically significant for just three: grain products, animal products, and prepared foods and meals.Looking at recall by type of risk, the author of the study, Elina Tselepidakis Page, PhD, MS, an agricultural economist for the USDA, found that 41% were due to pathogen contamination, such as Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella, and 27.4% were due to undeclared allergens. Overall, over the decade studied, the number of recalls related to pathogen contamination didn’t rise significantly, but recalls for allergens nearly doubled, which Page said is likely due to the passage of the federal food allergy safety law.Apr 16 USDA Economic Research Service report summary Apr 16 USDA Economic Research Service report Chlorine may help foodborne pathogens evade detectionThe use of chlorine for deterring foodborne pathogen growth might not only be ineffective, its use could help the pathogens avoid detection, a study today in mBio found.Many bacteria enter a viable-but-nonculturable (VBNC) state in response to environmental stresses during which they can’t be detected by standard laboratory culture testing often used to detect pathogens on produce. UK researchers assessed the effects of chlorine, a sanitizer commonly used for fresh produce, on Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson, two key foodborne bacteria.They found that L monocytogenes became VBNC at 50 parts per million (ppm) chloride, while Salmonella Thompson did so at 100 ppm. When these VBNC bacteria were ingested by roundworms called nematodes, the nematodes had statistically significant higher death rates, demonstrating the pathogenicity of the bacteria. In the case of L monocytogenes, its VBNC version was as infectious as its non-VBNC counterpart.The authors concluded, “It was also found that chlorine is ineffective at killing total populations of the pathogens. . . . These data show that VBNC food-borne pathogens can both be generated and avoid detection by industrial practices while potentially retaining the ability to cause disease.”Apr 17 mBio studylast_img read more

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Cambridge Sensotec – Second generation Rapidox Gas Recovery Bag

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Emerson expands ultrasonic flow meter family for LNG

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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No end of a lesson

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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Surfacing work starts at Townsville

first_imgThe AUD1.73 million (USD1.23 million) cargo laydown area, which was completed by local contractors in July earlier this year, is designed to accommodate project cargo, breakbulk and general cargo.This final phase of the project is valued at AUD400,000 (USD283,471) and will seal the surface of the laydown area, meaning that imported vehicles and heavy project cargo can be safely stored in the area while they are awaiting clearance from Customs and transport after import.POTL general manager trade and property, Claudia Brumme-Smith, said that the resurfacing meant that the Townsville port could now accommodate up to 800 cars at any one time as well as other project cargo that required a sealed, hardstand surface.Brummie-Smith said: “The import of cars and project cargo is one of our emerging trades that provide growth opportunities for the port and our region going forwards.”www.townsville-port.com.aulast_img read more

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