Milk prices, margins add urgency to MPP-Dairy revisions

first_imgThe reopening of enrollment for 2018 participation in the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy) took on additional urgency with the release of milk price and feed cost information for January. Meanwhile, dairy cows culled in January 2018 were the highest monthly total in five years. No information on MPP-Dairy enrollment yetAs of Feb. 27, the FSA was still finalizing details before reopening the 2018 enrollment period for MPP-Dairy. Wayne Maloney, in the FSA public affairs office, said USDA staff were putting the final touches on enrollment details and preparing a fact sheet concerning provisions included in a federal budget bill, signed into law Feb. 9. The sign-up period will be for 90 days, but exact dates have not yet been announced.advertisementadvertisementRead: No news regarding MPP-Dairy sign-up yet; Peterson unveils potential change in Farm BillJanuary milk prices tumbleThe handwriting of lower milk prices has been on the wall for a while, with signs of weakening at the end of 2017. On Feb. 27, the USDA National Ag Statistics Service (NASS) released its monthly Ag Prices report, showing the U.S. average milk price was $16.10 per hundredweight (cwt) in January 2018, down $1.10 from December 2017, $2.80 less than January 2017, and equaling the 19-month low of July 2016.Among the 23 major dairy states (Table 1), January prices were $1 or more less than December 2017 in 16 states, led by a $1.60 decline in Illinois and $1.50 drops in Oregon and Wisconsin. The average price dipped below $15 per cwt in Michigan, which held the distinction of the lowest state average. Florida’s average of $20.40 per cwt remained the nation’s high.Compared to a year earlier, January 2018 milk prices were down $3 or more in 12 states.advertisementMPP-Dairy margin shrinksThe USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) also released the MPP-Dairy milk income margin for January and, with the lower milk price, the U.S. average margin over feed costs slipped to $8.12 per cwt. While still above the highest MPP-Dairy insurable trigger level of $8 per cwt, it was the thinnest monthly margin since July 2016 (Table 2).The effect of lower milk prices was compounded by slightly higher feed costs. National average prices for corn ($3.29 per bushel, up 6 cents per bushel from December and the highest since July 2017), alfalfa hay ($152 per ton, up $4 from December and the highest since October 2017) and soybean meal ($322.59 per ton, up $3.37 and the highest since July 2017) resulted in total feed costs of $7.98 per cwt of milk sold, up 14 cents from December.Based on milk and feed futures prices as of Feb. 27, the Program on Dairy Markets and Policy projects monthly MPP-Dairy margins will continue to decline, falling near or below below $7 per cwt from February through June.January dairy cow slaughter highest in five yearsU.S. dairy farmers are milking a lot of cows, but they also culled more cows in January 2018 than in any month in five years, according to USDA records.The culling increase reflects farmers holding onto cows through December, a month when cow prices are generally weakest, and the shrinking milk income margins.advertisementFor January 2018, federally inspected milk cow slaughter was estimated at 289,800 head, 42,500 more than December 2017 and 20,800 more than January 2017. It was the highest monthly total since January 2013, when 296,900 head were removed from milking herds.The USDA’s latest milk production report indicated there were 9.405 million cows in U.S. dairy herd in January 2018, up from 9.369 million head the same month a year earlier. Based on the slaughter estimates, about 3.1 percent of the herd was culled in January 2018, compared to 2.9 percent in January 2017.Read: U.S. milk output, cow numbers start year higherJanuary cull cow prices riseDespite the high culling rate, U.S. average cull cow prices rose in January, although the increase was modest. Cull cow prices (beef and dairy combined) averaged $63.30 per cwt, up $1.30 from December, but 70 cents less than January 2017.   Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairymanEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.comlast_img read more

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F2H Votes: Farmington City Council candidate Jeff Scott

first_img Reported by Farmington Voice sent questionnaires to five Farmington city council and four Farmington Hills city council candidates. Responses are being published in the order they were received. Read all of our election coverage here: farmingtonvoice.com/tag/electionsJeff ScottJeff ScottWhat best qualifies you to serve on Farmington city council?Experience, Experience, Experience. I am fully invested in Farmington. For the past 30 years Farmington has been my home for my wife Anne and our children. During that period, I have been intimately involved with our community in one way or another. I have been involved with the City Administration in various positions for nearly 15 years, the past 4 years, serving on the City Council. Prior to that I served on the Planning Commission and the Zoning Board of Appeals. I also serve as Farmington’s representative on the 8 Mile Boulevard Association and the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments. Additionally, I have served on numerous study committees and boards.So, when discussions concerning the Farmington Vision Plan, Downtown Area Plan, Grand River Corridor Plan, the Parks and Recreation Plan or the Capital Improvement Plan, I don’t just know that they exist, but I have inherent knowledge of it’s content since I was involved with their development. Many of those plans are now showing the fruits of our collective efforts. The redevelopment of the Kmart site, the new Fresh Thyme Grocery, the proposed new development at the Maxfield Training Center and the anticipated new development on the old courthouse property on Ten Mile Road to name a few.Other community activities which I have been involved with include: South Farmington Blues baseball coach (13 years), Director of the South Farmington Blues Invitational Tournaments (9 years), Farmington High School Hockey Booster Club president (5 years) and Farmington First United Methodist Church finance committee and staff parish relations committees.I also bring to the City Council the experience as a registered architect (30+ years) and a business owner for nearly 25 years. 17 years ago, I purchased and renovated the building where our 16 professional employees provide architectural and engineering services regionally as well as nationally. I deal with different communities every day. I am able to gain a unique perspective on what other communities do well and where they fall short. I understand issues regarding our roads, water and sewer systems. I understand the balance between historical preservation, for which I have won awards, and the necessity to grow our tax base. I feel I have the ability to properly lead Farmington into the future.I understand the issues business owners deal with every day. Making payroll, dealing with governmental bureaucracies, personnel issues, creating and maintaining budgets and planning for the future are just a few issues I deal with regularly. I bring a common sense, fiscally sound approach to the Council.There is time for information gathering and contemplation, but endless discussions of issues do not move the City forward. Hard decisions will need to be made and I have a solid track record of accomplishments. I bring to our community, my ties, my commitment, my education, my decision making and extensive experience as a businessman and architect to the City Council, which make me the best qualified candidate.Describe your vision for the future of Farmington looking 10 years ahead.I feel this is the most important task of a City Council Member: How will the policies implemented by the Council impact the future of the City. Some might desire no change to occur. They believe they can hold onto the past, preserve anything old with a new coat of paint will suffice. All the while, change is happening all around us. People’s views on desired businesses, adequate housing or necessary city services, change. Change is inevitable. I believe controlled change, in the manner desired by our neighbors is. positive and healthy. To control change you cannot be reactionary, you need to get out in front of an issue.Farmington is well positioned for the future. Aside from the City Master Plan and the DDA Downtown Master Plan, our neighbors, businesses and stakeholders have already taken the time to delve into various areas of our city to create a more detailed road map for the future. I am proud to say I, along with many of our neighbors have participated in various plans and studies which include: The Farmington Vision Plan, The Downtown Area Plan, The Grand River Corridor Improvement Plan, The Parks and Recreation Master Plan, The Orchard Lake and Ten Mile Intersection Study and the Rouge River Nature Trail Project. As mentioned these plans and studies act as the road map of the desired development.It is with that background that I feel I can confidently follow the road map to imagine what Farmington would look like in 10 years.The new multi-story residential development at the Maxfield Training Center has been completed. As a result of the influx of new downtown residents, new businesses and restaurants have opened in downtown. The retail shops to the east of Fresh Thyme will be reconstructed to multi-story mixed use development. The Farmington Streetscape (similar to the streetscaping along Grand River) has been implemented. A permanent public art program has taken hold with much public support. A new mixed-use development has been constructed on the current city hall site. A new modern city hall is constructed south of downtown.Parking issues are being addressed with public private partnerships. New technology will assist employees and patrons where available parking is located on a real-time basis. Walkability has improved with additional crosswalks and warning beacons. Additional bike lanes have been implemented throughout the city.New mixed-use housing, retail and office developments extending east from the downtown along Grand River to the Rouge River Bridge. The historic Farmington Junction Power House (Winery) will be renovated and repurposed into a mixed-use development which will attract regional interest. As part of that development the beginning of the Rouge River Nature Trail will begin to take place with a river access node. Another river access node is developed at the Grand River Bridge. Because of the Winery renovation, new development is occurring in that entire area.Our real strength will be our neighborhoods. Public Safety services will remain premiere with Farmington continuing to be one of the safest places in the country to live. With the increased walkability, bikeability and the ease of access to the downtown; demand for our neighborhoods will be strong resulting in higher property values. Our current housing stock will continue to be updated by new families which will also keep our school system strong.Our historical district will be strengthened. A consensus will have been developed where the residents of the district acknowledge that instead of owning (in a traditional sense) an historical home, they are actually stewards, preserving the heritage of our community. This is achieved by reasonable, clear and consistent application of the approved guidelines. Residents surrounding the historical district as well as elsewhere throughout the city see how the increased value benefits them; as a result, the size of the historical district increases. New housing is located adjacent to the sledding hill (the sledding hill remains) replacing the old courthouse, school, bus garage and school administration buildings.The growth in development and property values increases our tax base which begins to alleviate the budgetary pressures on city administration. Through attrition, sound financial management and decisions previously made by the City Council, retiree health and pension demands will have subsided and no longer a major obstacle on the City’s budget. Technology has fully taken hold of the public works department with their files and records are fully integrated. Our roads, water and sewer systems will be continually monitored and maintenance and repair programs performed more efficiently and consistently. The budget contains funds for capital improvements for our parks, parking lots, streetscapes, public safety equipment and cultural and recreational activities.Based upon our recent successes and our road maps for the future, Farmington is positioned for prosperity. It is imperative that we maintain our momentum.What is Farmington’s most critical challenge today and how should the community address it?Balancing the budget. Our neighbors expect and deserve high quality services: safe neighborhoods and streets, 2-minute emergency response times, quality roads, dependable sewer and water systems. Curbside leaf pick-up and 24-hour snow plowing are also special services which elevates Farmington as a desirable place to live.Just over half of the City’s revenues come from property taxes. Proposition A combined with the drop in property values resulting from the great recession, means every mil levied by the City generates approximately $100,000 less than 2007. This translates to about 1 1⁄2 million dollars per year. So, for the past 10 years the City has been sustaining our quality services with less revenue.Unfortunately, one of the significant areas which were cut or saw significant reductions was for capital improvements. These are things like maintenance of our roads, water, sewer, parks, parking lots, vehicles, buildings and grounds. The lack of re-investment into our infrastructure and deferred maintenance is beginning to show throughout the City and we need to begin to address this more aggressively. I was a member of the steering committee which recently completed Farmington’s first capital improvement program in many years. The capital improvement program and capital expenditures looked at potential projects over the next 5 years.These were identified as: urgent, necessary-short term, necessary-long term or desired-not necessary. In all, 141 projects were identified with an approximate cost of $28 million.Obviously, we will not be able to address all the projects but we need to have a starting reference point.To put additional pressure on the budget, the Employee’s Retirement Pension System (MERS) changed their amortization policy which over the next five years will raise annual contributions by over $500,000.The State of Michigan is not helping Farmington. The amount of funds (revenue obtained by state income taxes and sales taxes) sent back from the State does not even meet the amount required by our state statute. If you were to compare revenue sharing to local municipalities of every state in the union, Michigan would be dead last. Some states have seen over 100% increases. In fact, Michigan is the only state where there has been a decrease in funding. Until the State of Michigan gets their act together and changes how local municipalities are funded, we are on our own.I am not in favor of raising your taxes to resolve the budget shortfalls. The best way to increase our tax base is to grow our way out. Farmington is an older community which is fully “built out”. We don’t have acres of vacant land where new development can occur. This means some of our structures will be replaced with higher density redevelopment projects. I believe this can be accomplished in a manor desired by the majority of our neighbors and without the City losing its character or heritage.In order to attract new development, we need to allow for the developer to make a profit. So, when you hear people wanting less dense projects, that may sound great, but if the economies of scale diminish, the potential developers will look elsewhere and as a community we are left with a vacant or underutilized building (or property) with no expansion of our tax base. I believe I have the right experience and qualifications to help lead the City out of our budget issues.What do/will you do on a personal level to engage residents in city government and ensure thatyou’re hearing from a broad cross-section of the community?For the past 30 years I have lived, and the past 17 years worked, in the city of Farmington, so I am engaged with the community on a daily basis in one form or another. It’s interesting how much you can ascertain on how the City is functioning and providing services to our citizens just by being around and observing ones surroundings. Are the streets plowed, is the garbage picked up, are the leaves being pick up, what are the conditions of the roads, are there emergency DPW projects underway?That doesn’t mean I have extensive interaction with a broad cross-section of people on a daily basis, but I do think I am to able feel the pulse of the city. I will continue to engage our community by attending as many organizational or group functions held throughout the city as possible. I am always amazed and impressed on how many types there are, each with their own focus throughout the City and most them are volunteer driven. It’s there I can engage and hear from our neighbor’s regarding their issues and concerns.Additionally, our local newspapers and electronic media such as the Voice are good resources for our community. I do go on a few of the social media sites. Unfortunately, there are many times were social media is all about rumors and uninformed rants. I don’t usually respond on the sites since most issues cannot be properly or fully vetted in that format. Also, the social media sites do not represent a full cross-section of our community. They appear to have a greater base of support, but in actuality it is a very vocal but small minority.As I have been out campaigning and knocking on doors for the past few weeks I have been able to engage in a broad cross-section of our community. What I have found, is that what is most important to our neighbors does not extend much beyond their own driveway; safe streets, good roads, reliable water, sewer and electric, trash pickup and they love the curbside leaf pick-up.When I ask them about other issues in the City or other concerns, the majority says they like living in Farmington, they like the direction the City is heading in and keep doing what you are doing.If anyone is interested in contacting me they can go to my webpage at electjeffscott.com or email me at jeff@electjeffscott.com. admin Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Homme Earns Third Player of the Week Award

first_img BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – For the third time this season University of West Florida sophomore Lindsay Homme (Willowbrook, Ill.) was named the Gulf South Conference’s Offensive Player of the Week, it was announced Tuesday.Homme played in all six sets during the Argonaut’s two conference road wins this past weekend, slugging 26 kills and earning a .512 attack percentage. The middle hitter was also good for 11 total blocks and three service aces as the Argos extended their winning streak to nine games.West Florida (12-7, 7-0 GSC), along with Homme, will be back on the court this weekend as they host the UWF Regional Crossover. The first match for the Argos is scheduled for Thursday at 7 p.m. against Florida Southern. For more information on West Florida volleyball and information on all UWF Athletics, visit www.GoArgos.com.Print Friendly Version Share Homme Earns Third Player of the Week Awardcenter_img Homme earned her fourth overall GSC Player of the Week award and her third this season (Photo by Jim Hogue) last_img read more

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Win 2 Free Tickets To Go See AFC Cleveland Battle For The Cup!

first_imgGame schedule  6/2/17 – 6:30pm FC United vs Michigan Bucks 6/2/17 – 8:30pm AFC Cleveland vs Christos FC 6/3/17 – 5:00pm 3rd place game 6/3/17 – 7:00pm Championship game Vince McKee Now is your chance, simply leave your name in the comment field below, and what night you want 2 free tickets for, June 2 or June 3rdAnd we will send them to you by match time! Each night maxes out at 10 sets of free tickets each. The Schedule is below, Good Luck and Enjoy!center_img The following AFC Cleveland Royals article is brought to you by http://www.sweetiescandy.com/ & http://www.frontlinesoccer.com/The Hank Steinbrecher Cup is coming to Cleveland, this weekend!Do you want to see the four best amateur soccer teams in the country collide?In your own backyard?For Free? Related TopicsAFC Cleveland RoyalsHank Steinbrecher Cuplast_img read more

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Paul Mainieri on LSU baseball’s trip to Houston

first_imgPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUND Session ID: 2020-09-19:c332b223dcdd2164c0a7600 Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-852006-4096001141001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Paul Mainieri on LSU baseball’s trip to Houston to face Houston, Baylor and Nebraska.last_img read more

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Honda drivers have a ‘frustrating 500 miles’

first_img Session ID: 2020-09-18:9180b2e1c6f2f17436d11404 Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-431798-4254485484001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Graham Rahal played catch-up for 3 hours and 5 minutes Sunday afternoon at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, pushing and charging and scraping for every last speck of speed.In the end he’d chase the leaders for 500 miles. Problem was: He could’ve chased for 500 more and still never closed the gap.Why? Because Rahal was racing the 99th edition of the Indianapolis 500 with one arm tied behind his back. That’s life when you’re running a Honda engine on a day – a month, really – that was thoroughly conquered by Chevrolet.It was clear early in May and clear throughout Sunday’s race: A Honda wasn’t winning this year’s 500. Chevrolet was that dominant, that overwhelming. They were faster. Stronger. Better.Rahal settled for the best of the rest: His fifth-place finish led a Honda crew of 18 drivers that landed just two in the top 11.Doyel: Will Power knows he should have won Indy 500“The Chevy was just in a league of its own, unfortunately, on horsepower,” Rahal said. “I was happy that we were as close to (third-place finisher Charlie Kimball) and (fourth-place finisher Scott Dixon) as we were.“I thought there was no hope.”There wasn’t much hope after pole day. A week ago Chevrolet flexed its muscle, powering each of the top five qualifiers and six of the top eight. In Sunday’s race their dominance was even more stark. Chevy-driven cars grabbed the first four spots and eight of the top 10.Only Marco Andretti (sixth), a veteran who entered Sunday’s race with five top-five finishes at Indianapolis under his belt in just nine starts, joined Rahal among Honda drivers in the top 10.An hour after the race concluded, leaning on a bench in his team garage in Gasoline Alley, Rahal tackled the discrepancy head-on. Did it feel like he was playing catch-up for three hours? Because it sure looked like it.“Without a doubt,” he said without hesitation. “We didn’t have the horsepower. Look at their speeds. They’re definitely quicker.”Was fifth the best he could’ve hoped for, all things considered?Curt Cavin’s Indy 500 quick hits“Without a doubt,” he said once more.It was one of the more impressive performances of the day. Rahal started 17th and grinded his way through the field bereft of the speed the lead pack flaunted all afternoon. Whether it was winner Juan Pablo Montoya, runner-up Will Power or the late-charging Charlie Kimball, the Chevy machines put on quite a show. Especially over the course of the final 10 laps.Honda, meanwhile, played chase. Rahal and Andretti lingered in the top 10 all afternoon by avoiding mistakes. They drove safe and smart. But it was apparent they never had the extra gear required to contend for a spot in victory lane.“It was a frustrating 500 miles,” was how Andretti put it. “It was just hard to keep the car balanced, let alone try to win. I was just trying to be best in class, but there were so many times that I just got the short end of the stick.”The 10 Chevy cars that finished the race averaged 161.228 mph compared to the 160.896 mph average managed by the 12 Honda cars that completed all 500 miles.Despite crashes, cars stay on the ground in Indy 500“We were in the hunt all day, I just don’t know if we ever had enough to beat the (Roger) Penske or (Chip) Ganassi cars,” Rahal said. “But I think we were the next-best. We just had to keep pushing.”Gabby Chaves was the top rookie finisher in 16th. He was asked after the race if it felt like the Honda drivers had enough power to hang with the Chevys.“Well, we didn’t,” Chaves said. “I think we were definitely a little bit under-powered, under-paced compared to the other guys.”All 33 cars in Sunday’s field were required to use the same chassis. The variables started with the engines and the driver. Honda fielded 18 of the cars in this year’s race; Chevy had 15.Chevy’s average finish: Seventh. Honda’s average finish: 15th.The difference in performance was clear, same as it was all month at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.Rahal knew his reality going in. He was intend on making the most of it.“There’s nothing you can do about it, you just have to do the best you can,” he said. “You have to hope for good pit stops, make some passes and work your way forward. You can’t sit here and get worked up about it all day. You just have to make the most of it.”So Rahal did. Fifth is the second-best day he’s ever had at Indy. He’ll leave Gasoline Alley with a smile.The rest of Honda? Much more of a scowl. Call Star reporter Zak Keefer at (317) 444-6134 and follow him on Twitter: @zkeefer. RACE RESULTS: Indianapolis 500Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUND Session ID: 2020-09-18:8d190eb7bd04c4be548d47c9 Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-44346-4254548197001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Marco Andretti makes a stop in his Honda on Sunday, May 24, 2015, at the 99th running of the Indianapolis 500 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Jennifer Dummett / For the StarMarco Andretti makes a stop in his Honda on Sunday, May 24, 2015, at the 99th running of the Indianapolis 500 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Jennifer Dummett / For the StarPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUNDlast_img read more

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Ex-LSU coach Bill Arnsparger dies at 88

first_imgBill Arnsparger, along with wife B.J. at his side, announces his retirement from NFL coaching at a news conference Wednesday, Feb. 1, 1995, in San Diego. Arnsparger died on Friday.Bill Arnsparger, along with wife B.J. at his side, announces his retirement from NFL coaching at a news conference Wednesday, Feb. 1, 1995, in San Diego. Arnsparger died on Friday.BATON ROUGE – Bill Arnsparger, who was one of the top defensive minds in professional football and a former head football coach at LSU in the mid-1980s, died on Friday at 88 at his home in Athens, Alabama.Arnsparger was head coach of the Tigers for three seasons (1984-86), leading LSU to two Sugar Bowl berths in 1984 and 1986. The 1986 squad was the school’s first Southeastern Conference champion since 1970. Shortly after the final regular season game in 1986, Arnsparger was hired as athletics director at the University of Florida.The Tigers were 8-3-1 overall and 4-1-1 to finish second in the SEC in 1984, 9-2-1 overall and 4-1-1 (T-2nd) in 1985 and 9-3 and 5-1 in winning the SEC title in 1986. He posted an overall record in the three years of 26-8-2 and 13-3-2 in the SEC.The announcement was made in a release from Laura Prewitt, executive director of the Breeders’ Cup Festival in Lexington, Kentucky. The release said that funeral services will be held in his hometown of Paris, Kentucky, where he was born in 1926. Arrangements are to be determined.After serving in the United States Marines during World War II, Arnsparger attended Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. After graduating in January 1950, Arnsparger remained in Oxford to work as an assistant with the Miami football team.He would go on to earn his reputation as a defensive mastermind serving as defensive line coach at Ohio State (1951-53), Kentucky (1954-61) and Tulane (1962-63) before moving to the NFL.He served as defensive line coach for the Baltimore Colts from 1964-69 before becoming the architect of the Miami Dolphins’ “No-Name” defenses from 1970-73 as Defensive Coordinator. The 1972 Dolphins won the Super Bowl and remain the only undefeated team in NFL history.Arnsparger was head coach for three years in the NFL (1974-76) with the New York Giants before returning to the Dolphins as Assistant Head Coach and Defensive Coordinator from 1976-83. That was where the “Killer B’s” defense was created (so named because of the number of surnames beginning with “B” on the Dolphin’s defense).Arnsparger came to LSU after the 1983 season when the Board of Supervisors voted to make a coaching change.From the book “The Fighting Tigers” by Peter Finney, Arnsparger said at his first press conference: “We’re working to win the conference championship and the national championship. I probably could have stayed in Miami as long as I wanted. But LSU is where I want to be. I recruited the area when I was a college assistant, and I know all about the feeling of being in Tiger Stadium on a Saturday night. I don’t know if I would have considered any other place.”The first season (1984) the Tigers appeared in the Sugar Bowl for the first time since 1968. Arnsparger won the SEC Coach of the Year honor as voted by the Nashville Banner. His second year, the Tigers went to the Liberty Bowl before a second Sugar Bowl appearance in 1986. After beating Tulane in the season finale, he told his team he would be stepping down after the bowl game as head coach of the Tigers, and he accepted the job as athletics director at the University of Florida where he would remain until 1992.He would make one final return to the NFL in 1992, finishing as the defensive coordinator of San Diego Chargers through 1994. Arnsparger announced his retirement at that time, citing the prostate cancer surgery he had undergone the year before.The final year in San Diego, his team made it to the Super Bowl, his sixth appearance in pro football’s biggest game.Arnsparger is survived by his wife, BJ, a son (David) and daughter Mary Susan.last_img read more

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Photo gallery: Haughton vs. Plain Dealing

first_imgImages from Friday’s Haughton vs. Plain Dealing game at Haughton. Haughton won 42-16. Top Expat InsuranceExpat Living in Hong Kong without Health Insurance?Top Expat Insurance|SponsoredSponsoredUndoNews gadgetThis watch takes the whole country by storm! it’s price? Ridiculous!News gadget|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTheTopFiveVPNThe Secret Netflix Doesn’t Want You To Know To Unblock RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPN|SponsoredSponsoredUndoPerfect-Dating.comAre You Ready to Meet Cool Guys in Tung Chung?Perfect-Dating.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTheTopFiveVPNThe Trick Netflix Doesn’t Want You To Know To Unlock RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPN|SponsoredSponsoredUndoCelebsland.com9 Celebrity Before-And-After Plastic Surgery DisastersCelebsland.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndolast_img

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College football conference championships: Times, TV schedule

first_imgCollege football conference champions will be decided today. Here are the matchups for each league and how to watch (all times ET):American championship: Temple at Houston, ABC, noonC-USA championship: Southern Miss at Western Kentucky, ESPN2, noonSEC championship: Alabama vs. Florida, CBS, 4 in AtlantaMountain West championship: Air Force at San Diego State, ESPN2, 7:30Pac-12 championship: Stanford vs. USC, ESPN, 7:45 in Santa Clara, Calif.ACC championship: North Carolina vs. Clemson, ABC, 8 in CharlotteBig Ten championship: Iowa vs. Michigan State, FOX, 8 in Indianapolis MUST-READ STORIESOur staff examines who will win each of the conference championships.Who should move into the Playoff if the No. 1 and/or No. 2 teams lose today?Bowl projections for the entire nation.The Blind Study compares three potential Playoff contenders without name bias.The best-case scenario for each team still contending for a Playoff berth. WHEN IS THE PLAYOFF FIELD SET?ESPN goes live at noon ET Sunday with its Selection Day special, and the four College Football Playoff teams are scheduled to be announced at approximately 12:30. Berths in the other four New Year’s Six bowls and the remainder of the Playoff selection committee’s top 25 are set to be announced at approximately 3 p.m.last_img read more

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County finance office is closed to public access

first_imgJACKSBORO, TN (WLAF) – The list of area offices and businesses that is closing their doors to public access is growing in light of the Coronavirus pandemic.  Add the county Finance Office to that list.Campbell County Director of Finance Jeff Marlow said, “After consultation with County Mayor E.L. Morton and County Commission Chairman Johnny Bruce, it has been determined that it is the best interest of the county to close the Finance Office to public access in an effort to lessen the likelihood of finance office employees becoming infected with the Coronavirus virus.”  Marlow points out that maintaining an uninterrupted flow of money to the county employees and to the vendors doing business with the county is essential to the financial wellbeing of the county as is taking every precaution to ensure the health of the employees that perform these tasks.While the office is closed to public access, anyone needing to conduct business with finance office personnel can make use of the office drop-box when delivering hard copy paperwork and to utilize an electronic means of delivery for paperwork whenever possible.  Later this morning, a sign will be placed on the front door entrance notifying the public that as a precautionary measure the finance office is being closed to public access until further notice, but that they can contact the finance office by calling the office number, 423.562.6201.Marlow said, “Hopefully things will return to a standard of normalcy in the next couple of weeks, but until then, we will err on the side of caution.”(WLAF NEWS PUBLISHED – 03/18/2020-6AM)Share this:FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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