Collaborating your way to compliance

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Amanda SmithWe often talk about collaboration in the context of business and product development; however, collaboration can also play an important role in regulatory compliance.  It is undeniable that the current regulatory climate is complex and can even seem insurmountable at times. It is showing no signs of slowing down and credit unions will have to adapt in order to maintain regulatory compliance without breaking the bank and sacrificing growth and production.  While the basic principles of regulatory compliance remain the same, more and more credit unions are finding that the old way of doing things no longer works and there is now a need to find new and innovative ways of training employees and staying in compliance. Collaboration is a way to do just that.Compliance was once thought of as being ancillary to the products and services offered by the credit union –  a cost of doing business.  Now with the recent onslaught of regulations, compliance has taken a place as a stand-alone entity.  No longer can a loan officer juggle managing the compliance of the department and processing loans.  The increase in regulations has forced credit unions to spend large sums of money to maintain regulatory compliance.  Most hire new employees to serve as compliance officers, conduct costly third party audits, train their employees on a regular basis regarding the changing regulations, and implement new software to assist them in keeping up with regulatory changes. Employees spend hours on training and implementing new regulations. To an attorney like myself, taking measures like this to ensure compliance is invaluable, but to a credit union it is tough to see the return on the thousands of dollars and hundreds of man-hours invested in compliance each year.One goal of collaboration is to help credit unions solve problems by leveraging scale, expertise, and efficiencies.  Every credit union has strengths and weaknesses when it comes to regulatory compliance. For example, your credit union may have a strong mortgage lending program, but you do not have a large credit card portfolio, you simply offer it as a member service.  Creating a network of local credit unions can help to capitalize on other credit unions’ strengths to improve upon your own credit union’s weaknesses.   Quarterly meetings to discuss recent regulatory changes and steps each credit union is taking towards compliance are a low cost alternative to formal seminars and training.  Many times it can be more useful as other credit unions will share your perspectives while speakers in seminars may not.Another goal of collaboration is to turn problems into opportunities.  Credit unions that have successful compliance programs or who have formed networks like the one discussed above can form a CUSO to provide compliance services to its owners and other non-owner credit unions.  The CUSO may specialize in certain areas such as mortgage lending, or NCUA regulations, or provide a more broad based compliance solution for its clients covering all aspect of credit union compliance. These CUSOs not only offer typical compliance resources such as written materials like forms and policies, but they also offer more unique resources like shared compliance officers.  For the owners, these CUSOs are a way to take an expense and turn it into an income generating event. Compliance should not be looked at as a competition but rather an opportunity to work together and to benefit from each other’s strengths.  Compliance is too expensive and too burdensome a task to go at alone. continue reading »last_img read more

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Quarles & Brady promote anthropology

first_imgQuarles & Brady promote anthropology January 15, 2013 Regular News QUARLES & BRADY in Naples, joined by the Florida Gulf Coast University Anthropology Club, hosted the third-grade class from Golden Terrace Elementary School at the Naples Zoo. More than 140 students took part in the program, which provided early exposure to anthropology and zoology. The Anthropology Club delivered 15-to 20-minute presentations at four designated stations throughout the zoo, including hands-on learning for the students. Pictured is Adelle Moro and Ivica Milanoski of the FGCU Anthropology Club explaining the jaw and teeth structure of the different primate species and comparing them to other animals.last_img read more

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Denn wir wissen nicht, was wir sagen (For we know not what we say)

first_imgSüddeutsche Zeitung:Wenn wir einen Satz sagen wollen, geht diesem im Idealfall ein Gedankenprozess voraus. Diese Gedanken wandelt unser Gehirn in Sprache um und anschließend kommen mehr oder weniger kluge Sätze aus unseren Mündern. Es gibt aber auch Forscher, die behaupten, dass Sprache nicht immer “geplant” wird – und dass Menschen zum Teil erst wissen, was sie reden, wenn sie sich sprechen hören. Folgt man diesem Ansatz, dann könnte man sie recht einfach davon überzeugen, etwas völlig anderes gesagt zu haben, als sie tatsächlich von sich gegeben haben.Das Magazin Psychological Science berichtet in seiner aktuellen Ausgabe von einer Untersuchung an der Universität im südschwedischen Lund. Die Probanden machten den sogenannten Stroop-Test. Dabei werden den Versuchspersonen Wörter gezeigt, die Farben beschreiben – also beispielsweise das Wort “Gelb”. Benennen sollen sie jedoch die Farbe der Schrift. Unterscheidet sich das Wort von der Farbe, in der es geschrieben wurde (etwa das Wort “Gelb” in grüner Schrift), erhöht sich die Fehlerzahl.Read the whole story: Süddeutsche Zeitunglast_img read more

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Linde proves resistant to crisis

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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FLIR Makes Executive Management Changes (USA)

first_imgFLIR Systems, Inc. announced changes to its executive management team.Thomas A. Surran has been appointed President of the Commercial Systems division, succeeding Andrew C. Teich, who was recently named FLIR’s President and Chief Executive Officer. Additionally, Jeffrey D. Frank has been promoted to the new role of Vice President, Global Product Strategy.“We are pleased to add Tom and Jeff to our executive staff,” said Mr. Teich, President and CEO of FLIR. “Tom has a proven ability to execute with vision and control, which we saw in his advancement of our maritime businesses. Jeff has been a driving force in new product conceptualization, development, and industrial design. Their skills will help position our global businesses for further growth, profitability, and continued product innovation.”[mappress]Press Release, May 26, 2013last_img read more

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Download limit

first_img John Edwards, JDL Edwards, Neston, Cheshire The letter from the grandly titled ‘Programme Director, CJS Efficiency Programme’ at the CPS poses more questions than it answers. Downloading every case in a court building on to the computer of each prosecutor at a court building on a particular day places those prosecutors under an obligation actually to prepare them. Anyone who has any experience of court work will realise that an impatient court or a brow-beating defence advocate anxious to get on will insist on a prosecutor dealing with a case from someone else’s court that has not been prepared. That is how serious mistakes are made.last_img

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Exclude the dissenters

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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Housing statistics – it’s no good in blaming the builders

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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High winds threaten progress against California wildfires

first_imgHigh winds threaten progress against California wildfires Published: October 14, 2017 11:42 AM EDT Updated: October 14, 2017 8:08 PM EDT SHARE SONOMA, Calif. (AP) Rising winds fanned the California wildfires again Saturday, forcing hundreds more people to flee from their homes in the state’s fabled wine country and threatening to undo the efforts of crews who have spent days trying to corral the flames behind firebreaks.Just a day after firefighters reported making significant progress, the winds kicked up and pushed flames into the hills at the edge of Sonoma, a town of 11,000. About 400 homes were evacuated in Sonoma and a portion of Santa Rosa that included a retirement community that evacuated earlier this week, authorities said.“Things went to hell last night,” said Dean Vincent Bordigioni, winemaker and proprietor at the Annadel Estate Winery, who awoke at 3 a.m. to see flames erupting over the ridge above his property. “They’ve got a good fight going on.”Nearly a week after the blazes began, the zone containing scattered fires had swollen to an area as wide as 100 miles. The flames have left at least 35 people dead and destroyed at least 5,700 homes and businesses, making them the deadliest and most destructive group of wildfires California has ever seen.On Saturday, an unknown number of additional structures burned down in a rural area, said Daniel Berlant, a spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.Judy Guttridge, who was evacuating for the second time this week, said her daughter saw flames advancing over the side of a hill around the same time Bordigioni did and told the family to get out.“I have good insurance, everything,” she said. “All the kids, grandkids, great-grandkids are fine. I’m OK with that.”Firefighters spent much of the last week digging defense lines to keep the flames from spreading. On Friday, they tried to fortify the edge of Sonoma using bulldozers and other heavy equipment.But if winds push the flames over that barrier, neighborhoods including some of the town’s costliest homes stand in the path, along with a historic central plaza built centuries ago when the area was under Spanish rule.The renewed strength of the winds was “testing the work that we accomplished,” Berlant said. The greatest risk was that winds would blow embers across the firebreaks and ignite new blazes.By early afternoon, state fire officials said they had halted the fire’s advance into the city of Sonoma. But winds gusting up to 40 mph were expected to continue throughout the day and into the evening.The latest estimates showed that about 100,000 people were under evacuation orders as the fires burned for a sixth day. Some people who have been evacuated all week demanded to get back into their homes.Douglas and Marian Taylor stood outside their apartment complex Saturday in Santa Rosa with their two dogs and a sign that said “End evacuation now.”Their building was unharmed at the edge of the evacuation zone with a police barricade set up across the street. The couple said they are spending about $300 per day to rent a motel and eat out, and they want to return home because the fire does not appear to threaten their home.At an evacuation center at the fairgrounds in the Sonoma County city of Petaluma, volunteers sifted through mounds of donated baby wipes, diapers, pillows, shoes and clothing.Randy Chiado and his wife, Barbara, evacuated Monday from the Oakmont section of Santa Rosa. They stayed for several days with a friend in Santa Rosa but left Saturday when flames approached again and sought refuge at the fairgrounds.“After so many times of ‘It’s coming, get ready, it’s coming, get ready,’ it just gets nerve-wracking,” Barbara Chiado said. Life away from home has been difficult and dangerous.Randy Chiado said a man who may have suspected he was a looter tried to punch him through his car window and yelled for a friend to get a gun when the Chiados turned onto a residential street after they evacuated their home. He said he was able to push the man off and drive away.The couple would be spending the night with other evacuees in a room set up with cots. “It’s like jail,” he said.Astonishing video released from the fire’s hellish first night showed the courage of the deputies and firefighters working amid the flames.“Go! Go! Go! Go! Go!” an unidentified Sonoma County deputy can be heard yelling in the body-camera video released by the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office. The footage was recorded as he urged hesitant drivers to speed out of a town that was being devoured by flames.The deputy is shown lifting a disabled woman out of her wheelchair and into an SUV to rush her out of town. And he drives through walls of flame looking for more people to help.“And that’s just one person,” Sonoma County Sheriff Rob Giordano said Friday at a news conference.More than a dozen fires broke out nearly simultaneously on Oct. 8 and people had little time to escape. Most of the deaths were elderly people.In all, 17 large fires still burned across the northern part of the state, with more than 9,000 firefighters attacking the flames using air tankers, helicopters and more than 1,000 fire engines. Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know.last_img read more

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