Rep. Stephanie Clayton announces she’ll seek District 7 seat in Kansas Senate

first_imgFour-term Rep. Stephanie Clayton has entered the race for the Senate District 7 race in 2020. File photo.Four-term Rep. Stephanie Clayton today announced she plans to run for the Senate District 7 seat being vacated by Barbara Bollier, who announced a month ago that she is running for the U.S. Senate.Clayton’s entry into the field sets up a potential Democratic primary against former Kansas Democratic Party Executive Director Ethan Corson, who announced he would seek to replace Bollier shortly after her entry into the U.S. Senate race. No Republican candidates have announced plans to seek the seat at this point.Clayton has been an outspoken advocate for greater transparency in the statehouse during her time in office, and has become well known among constituents for her active presence on social media and her frequent coffee meetings with residents. She said she believes the same approach to service she’s employed representing House District 19 would be beneficial in the Senate.“The Seventh Senate district is comprised of one of the most educated, active, and engaged communities in Kansas, who require a high level of service, communication, and collaboration, all of which I will continue to deliver,” Clayton said. “I look forward to earning their trust and their votes for this new position.”Clayton was first elected to the statehouse in 2012, and, along with Bollier and Melissa Rooker, was part of a group of moderate Republicans who were often at odds with state party leaders. She easily won reelection in 2014, 2016 and 2018, fending off challenges from conservative Republicans and Democrats along the way. But, ahead of the 2019 session, she followed Bollier in leaving the Republican party, saying the GOP’s position on K-12 funding was at odds with her beliefs. She switched her party affiliation to Democrat.Asked for comment on Clayton’s entry into the race, Corson pointed to his history working to elect Democratic candidates like Claire McCaskill, Sharice Davids, Barack Obama and Gov. Laura Kelly.“I’m excited to start knocking on doors in January and talking to voters about my nearly 20 years of serving the Democratic Party and fighting for progressive causes,” Corson said.Clayton is a co-founder of the Bipartisan Women’s Caucus in the Kansas legislature and has served on the Johnson County Commission on Aging since 2013. She is also the Vice President of the National Council of State Legislators Women’s Legislative Network.Clayton, a Shawnee native, attended SM Northwest and Emporia State University. She and her husband Ben live in Overland Park with their two children, who attend Shawnee Mission schools.last_img read more

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Can You Be Addicted to Social Media?

first_imgEveryday Health:These days, you’ll be hard-pressed to find someone who isn’t caught up in a world of status updates, re-tweets, followers and check-ins. Social media has certainly made it easier for people to connect with each other and share information. And with Facebook boasting more than 900 million monthly users and a record-breaking IPO, the social media space is only going to expand.The problem is, the fast-paced, instant-gratification nature of social media creates an environment where we often feel highly compelled to broadcast our thoughts and experiences to others. The immediate positive reinforcement that we get (in the form of likes, comments, etc.) makes us want to do it more often. Over time, as this becomes habit-forming, the thought of not being able to share anything can actually cause psychological discomfort and anxiety.Read the whole story: Everyday Healthlast_img read more

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Writing Helps You Remember Things Better Than Typing

first_imgBuzzFeed: Close the lid of your laptop: New research shows that taking notes by hand helps you remember conceptual information better than typing notes on your computer.Researchers asked note-takers to listen to a TED Talk and later asked questions about it that either recalled facts or required conceptual thinking.Read the whole story: BuzzFeed More of our Members in the Media >last_img

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When It Comes To Romantic Attraction, Real Life Beats Questionnaires

first_imgNPR:Dating sites claim to winnow a few ideal suitors out of a nigh-infinite pool of chaff. But the matches these algorithms offer may be no better than picking partners at random, a study finds.Researchers asked about 350 heterosexual undergrads at Northwestern University to fill out questionnaires assessing their personalities and romantic preferences.They were quizzed about things like self-esteem, goals, values, loneliness, what they were looking for in a partner, and how assertive or patient or creative they want the partner to be — and how much those things apply to them, says Samantha Joel, a psychologist at the University of Utah and lead author on the study, which was published last week in Psychological Science. “Lots of traits that have been theorized to be important for relationships in past literature.”Then the participants went on four-minute speed dates and rated how attracted they felt to each person.Read the whole story: NPR More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Lund International Promotes Mitch Fogle to GM, Deflecta-Shield Accessories Division

first_imgANOKA, MN — Lund International has promoted Mitch Fogle to general manager of the company’s Deflecta-Shield Accessories Division (DAD). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Fogle has been with Lund International and DAD since 2003. Prior to his promotion, he held the position of plant manager and has been directing efforts associated with improving operational efficiency, restructuring inventory levels and providing superior product availability to customers. Under the mentoring of Jerry Schomaker, former site vice president at DAD and now site vice president at Ventshade, and Harry Samp, site vice president at Belmor and Deflecta-Shield, Fogle is poised to take over daily operations at DAD. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit. last_img read more

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AGU: US Infrastructure Unprepared For Increasing Frequency Of Extreme Storms

first_img“We really need to get the word out about just how far behind our design standards are from there they should be,” Wright said. “The take-home message is that infrastructure in most parts of the country is no longer performing at the level that it’s supposed to, because of the big changes that we’ve seen in extreme rainfall,” said Daniel Wright, a hydrologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and lead author of the new study. “Design engineers at cities, consulting companies, and counties use this for different purposes, like infrastructure design management, infrastructure risk assessment and so forth. It has a lot of engineering applications,” said Amir Aghakouchak, a hydrologist at the University of California, Irvine who was not involved with the new study. Extreme weather events are on the rise, but U.S. water management systems use outdated design guidelines. New research, published in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters, analyzed data from multiple regions throughout the U.S. and found the rising number of extreme storms combined with outdated building criteria could overwhelm hydrologic structures like stormwater systems. Written by Abigail Eisenstadt, AGU public information intern. By comparing the number of storms that actually happened against the number predicted by IDF curves, the researchers also showed the potential consequences for U.S. infrastructure. In some regions, for example, infrastructure designed to withstand extreme rainstorms could face these storms every 40 years instead of every 100 years. But climate change is causing extreme rainfall events to occur more often in many regions of the world, something IDF curves don’t take into account. One measure of extreme rainfall is the 100-year storm, a storm that has a one percent chance of happening in a given year, or a statistical likelihood of happening once in 100 years on average. Engineers often use statistical estimates called IDF curves to describe the intensity, duration, and frequency of rainfall in each area. The curves, published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), are created using statistical methods that assume weather patterns remain static over time. WASHINGTON, D.C. ― Current design standards for United States hydrologic infrastructure are unprepared for the increasing frequency and severity of extreme rainstorms, meaning structures like retention ponds and dams will face more frequent and severe flooding, according to a new study.center_img Wright and his colleagues wanted to know how existing IDF curves compare with recent changes in extreme rainfall. They analyzed records from more than 900 weather stations across the U.S. from 1950 to 2017 and recorded the number of times extreme storms, like 100-year storms, exceeded design standards. AGU News: The scientists found that in most of the country the growing number of extreme rainstorms can be linked to warming temperatures from climate change, although natural events, such as El Niño, also occasionally affect the Southeast’s climate. For example, in the eastern United States, extreme rainstorm events are happening 85 percent more often in 2017, than they did in 1950. In the western U.S., these storms are appearing 51 percent more often now than they once did. “Infrastructure that has been designed to these commonly-used standards is likely to be overwhelmed more often than it is supposed to be,” Wright said.The researchers hope the findings will encourage climate scientists, hydrologists, and engineers to collaborate and improve U.S. hydrologic infrastructure guidelines. The new study is particularly timely in light of recent storms and flash floods along the East Coast. Hurricane Florence’s unprecedented rainfall caused extensive damage to infrastructure in North and South Carolina after it made landfall in fall of 2018. Courtesy/U.S. Air Forces Central Commandlast_img read more

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Fr. Glenn: Finding The Vineyard

first_imgBy Fr. Glenn JonesSo … Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (commonly a.k.a., “RBG”) finally succumbed to the cancer that’s been plaguing her for so long; may she rest in peace. No matter what political flavor you might ascribe to, you certainly can’t fault her dedication. Lots of people say that they want to “die in harness”, but she fought and did it. But, inevitably … we’re in store for an even more “interesting” time in the political arena just before the election … much like a tornado adds “interest” to a thunderstorm.We all have an instinctive fear of death … the great unknown. “What’s it like?” we wonder.  Even atheists often fear death … which may belie their trust in their beliefs. “What if all that Christian stuff is actually…true?!”, they may find themselves asking in that too-often sudden and unexpected moment before death.Waiting until one’s potential earthly end to explore the truth of life after death, however, is foolhardy in the extreme, especially with eternity hanging in the balance. And yet … we Christians believe that God’s grace cannot NOT but work in everyone’s life, for our very existence is dependent upon that grace, and until the end of life—whether it be long or short—His grace seeks to strike deeper root within us.We see this in the Gospel parable of the Catholic Mass this weekend—that of the vineyard owner who hires workers all during the day, and rewards them equally at the close of work (Matthew 20). Likewise, the master of the eternal vineyard comes to each of us innumerable times in our lives, seeking to “hire” us to labor in His vineyard—not for a paltry wage, but for eternal life. The “hire” is our acceptance of His call.Now, we all have God’s basic law imbued within us at our creation—that which is called “natural law”, basic principles of right and wrong, justice and injustice, morality etc., which are universal. This is explicit in the 10 Commandments, as well as in other religions and philosophies: respecting the Creator, parents, the other person—our neighbor. Yet we are also called to labor in the garden to improve the world for our fellow Man—those both working with us and those not—as part of our “hire”. The constant “Help Wanted” ad is human conscience … ever goading us to do what is right and to avoid that which is wrong. Even those not exposed to Christianity have this unrelenting goad of conscience to follow what God has imbued within us. We can suppress conscience, but it is relentless.But laboring in God’s vineyard by no means is easy; in fact, the faithful Christian (or one faithful to conscience) is often a “lone ranger” either in our family, among friends or in society at large. Imagine the difficulty of having to break from one’s whole family in order to do the right. And yet … with great courage, many do that very thing, like many others who refuse to compromise principles, come what may. RBG, for example—right or wrong, loved and reviled—remained faithful to her own principles. Most people respect such persons infinitely more than those who blow with the prevailing wind.And we remember that it’s much easier to follow the good when we keep ourselves in like company … to labor alongside our fellow workers in the field. As St. Paul emphasized: “Do not be deceived: ‘Bad company ruins good morals.’” (1 Corinthians 15:33) But even if we have to go it alone, God gives us the grace to do so, for “God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your strength…” (1 Corinthians 10:13) Such is not a challenge uncommon in our day: to not lie when so many do so, to not disparage others while many are, to not click on websites or watch programs or listen to media which denigrate others, etc.But the primary point of Jesus’ parable, I think, is simply to relay God’s unbounded generosity … emphasizing His love for all who sincerely seek Him—whenever they find Him during their lives. God—the vineyard owner—calls everyone one way or another—even from birth because of that natural law ingrained within us, and even those who may never even have heard of Jesus.  No person is created simply to be rejected, otherwise, how could St. Paul claim that God “…desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.” (1 Timothy 2:4)Remember the older brother in the Prodigal Son parable (Luke 15) … angry and jealous of his younger brother who squandered his father’s wealth, and yet returned home repentant to the joy of his father. The father assures the resentful older brother: “Son…It was fitting to make merry and be glad, for this your brother was dead, and is alive; he was lost, and is found.” (Luke 15:31-32) So let us rejoice with those who find God whenever they find Him … because many people never do. And rejoice that we are privileged to work in our Father’s vineyard even now.God may call to the harvest at different times and in different ways—perhaps with a special prodding of grace that finally breaks through our deafness … ends our blindness. We are created Good, but it is our own choice to remain in that goodness … or not.We are not our competitors in the spiritual life, but rather teammates … or, better yet, family.Some run faster … some slower … some may have to stop and walk a while. But our desire should be to get all across the finish line. And leadership is not just getting yourself across the line, but helping and encouraging your teammates along the way.That’s the way to look at others who may be struggling in the faith, or even in basic morality—not to be superior, not to berate, but to encourage and to support, and to point out the obstacles and dangers in their path. They may have to lean on you a while, but that’s what Christianity is:  helping others, and to “…preach the word, be urgent in season and out of season, convince, rebuke, and exhort, be unfailing in patience and in teaching,” (2 Timothy 4:2) … keeping our eyes fixed on the goal and striving to help all to reach it.That is the leadership to which we are called … to be the “…salt of the earth and the light of the world.” (cf., Matthew 5:13, 14).Rev. Glenn Jones is the Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe and former pastor of Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Los Alamos.last_img read more

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Scientific rigour or artistic licence? There’s value in both

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Gallery Walk

first_imgAlex FerroneAlex Ferrone, of her eponymous Cutchogue gallery, will have her aerial photos showcased in a solo exhibition at the Peconic Landing Theater Gallery in Greenport, presented by East End Arts. The show will be on display through November 30. A reception will take place on Friday, July 20, from 4 to 6 PM.Keith SonnierAmerican artist Keith Sonnier, whose exhibition “Keith Sonnier: Until Today” is on view at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill through January 27, will discuss his work with friends and fellow artists Nate Lowman and Adam McEwen on Friday, July 20, at 6 PM in the museum’s Lichtenstein Theater. Sonnier chose Lowman and McEwen to join him for the conversation at the Parrish because he considers them to be among the next generation of artists who have a deep connection to his work.I AMThis summer, The White Room Gallery hosts a series of live art happenings with “I AM,” alongside visual art programming in its space in Bridgehampton. The dates of the performance art happenings are July 21 at 6 PM, and August 18 at 7:30 PM. RSVP and tickets can be reserved by emailing iam@iam-dining.com or purchasing tickets through www.paypal.me/thewhiteroomgallery.Causing a Stir“Causing a Stir,” a new collection of works featuring wooden spoons, will be on view at Chase Edwards Contemporary in Bridgehampton through Saturday, August 4. A portion of the proceeds will benefit City Harvest.For this exhibition, Patti Grabel has combined her love of food and art into the central theme of her work as embodied by the spoon. The works feature photographic compositions printed on both paper and glass depicting wooden spoons. The narrative threads in each work embrace a variety of themes such as nourishment, sensuality, creative expression, aspirations and the liberating act of taking chances.An opening cocktail reception will be held on Saturday, July 21, from 4 to 7 PM.ONGOING ExhibitsArt Market Summer Group“Art Market Summer Group,” an exhibit at Roman Fine Art in East Hampton, will run through July 30. Artists include Ray Caesar, Tim Conlon, Michael Dweck, The Kaplan Twins, Reisha Perlmutter, Dalton Portella, Dean West, and Stephen Wilson.Chinese InspirationChinese philosophy and artistic tradition meet American resourcefulness and imagination in “Robert Oxnam: Chinese Inspiration/North Fork Creation” at the William Ris Gallery in Jamesport. The show runs July 14 through August 12.CaptivateThe White Room Gallery in Bridgehampton presents “Captivate.” Five featured artists bring together captivating sculpture, photography, encaustic painting, and mixed media. Artists include Linda Sirow, Brian Craig, Martha McAleer, Kat O’Neill, and Dennis Leri. The show runs through July 29.IndispensableJulie Keyes’s gallery on The Circle in East Hampton presents “Indispensable,” featuring works by Nathan Slate Joseph, John Chamberlain, and David Slivka. The show runs through August 4.Marc DalessioGrenning Gallery in Sag Harbor presents a solo show by Marc Dalessio. Dalessio, one of the world’s leading plein air painters, has returned to the East End this year to paint locally as he has done for many years, since he first came in 1999.The gallery is also showing a very select group of major works from his year of painting around the globe. Although he is based mostly in Florence, Dalessio paints in Ireland, California, Cape Cod, Maine, Wales, Austria . . . wherever the beauty takes him. As an environmentalist, he is following his true inspiration. The show will run through July 30.Romany Kramoris GalleryRomany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor presents a group art show featuring local artists Lianne Alcon, Suzzanne Fokine, Ghilia Lipman-Wulf, and Muriel Hanson Falborn through July 26.Silver Screens of Suffolk“The Silver Screens of Suffolk” is on display at the Suffolk County Historical Society in Riverhead, celebrating the history of film from the 1900s to 1960s. The show runs through April 27, 2019.The Finder’s Eye“The Finder’s Eye,” a group exhibition guest curated by Teri Kennedy, is up at The Victor D’Amico Institute of Art/The Art Barge in Amagansett. Artists include Scott Bluedorn, Rossa Cole, Mabel D’Amico, Elaine Grove, Rowan Hausman, Doris Lerman, Francisco Sainz, Stephen Soreff, Janice Stanton, Aurelio Torres, and Charles Waller. The show runs through July 28.LA FriendsRental Gallery in East Hampton presents two exhibitions “LA Friends: Part 1” and “LA Friends: Part 2, curated by Tif Sigfrids.” The show runs through July 25.Lazy AfternoonThe Mattituck-Laurel Library presents “Lazy Afternoon,” a solo art show of paintings by East End artist Carol Gold. This exhibit will run through July 31.Halsey McKayThe Halsey McKay gallery in East Hampton presents Hope Gangloff and Jennie Jieun Lee. The show will run through July 31.See MemoryArtist and filmmaker Viviane Silvera’s solo exhibition “See Memory” is at The Spur in Southampton. The show runs through July 28.Laurie AndersonGuild Hall in East Hampton presents the artwork of avant-garde artist, composer, musician, and film director Laurie Anderson. The show runs through July 22. To reserve a 15-minute virtual reality slot for either “Aloft” or “Chalkroom,” visit the Guild Hall website, www.guildhall.org.RescueEast End Arts in Riverhead presents the juried show “Rescue: People, Pets, Predicaments,” in partnership with the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation. The show runs through July 25.Hat MuseumThe Prosper King House & Lyzon Hat Museum in Hampton Bays is open for the season. The Lyzon Hat Shop Museum and Prosper King House will be open each Saturday from now till mid-September, 11 AM to 2 PM.TeapotsAn exhibit featuring teapots of the 19th Century from the Suffolk County Historical Society Museum’s permanent collection are on display in “A Moment of Tranquili–Tea.” The SCHS, located in Riverhead, has more than 100 teapots and presents the finest examples in this exhibit. The show runs through July 28.Hunting the Whale“Hunting the Whale: The Rise and Fall of a Southampton Industry” is on display at Rogers Mansion in Southampton. This interactive and inclusive exhibit adds new documents and artifacts, illuminating Southampton Village’s prominent role in the whaling industry at its mid-19th Century height. The exhibit runs through August 4.Five And Forward“Five and Forward” is an exhibition that celebrates the Parrish Art Museum’s fifth anniversary in its Herzog and de Meuron-designed building in Water Mill. On view through October 31, the exhibition takes a closer look at artists whose work represents major trends, themes, and concepts in American art history, and underscores the ongoing artistic legacy of Long Island’s East End.Deadline for submissions is Thursday at 9 AM. Email to jessica@indyeastend.com. Share Popsicles by Patti Grabellast_img read more

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Gallery Events

first_imgLabor Day Art ShowLevitas Center For The Arts, SouthamptonOpening: Saturday, September 1, 4 to 6 PMClosing: Friday, September 7, 4 to 6 PMThe Southampton Artists Association Labor Day Art Show will be held Wednesday, August 29, through Sunday, September 9. The show, which is held at Levitas Center for the Arts at the Southampton Cultural Center, will feature photography, paintings, drawing, and sculptures. For more info visit www.southamptonartists.org.Festival of the ArtsSt. Mark’s Church, Westhampton BeachWesthampton Beach Festival of the Arts returns this Labor Day weekend to St. Mark’s Church. The event takes place on Saturday, September 1, and Sunday, September 2. Each year, artisans and their artwork transform the Great Lawn into an extraordinary outdoor gallery of works in sculpture, jewelry, painting, photography and mixed-media, created using a variety of materials, styles, and techniques.Find exquisite creations in glass, ceramics, fiber art, metalwork, and wood. Enjoy the opportunity to interact with the artisans, and learn how they came to their artform and how the pieces were created. The event is held Saturday from 10 AM to 6 PM and Sunday from 11 AM to 6 PM. For more info visit www.paragonartevents.com.BoldJackson Carriage House, AmagansettOpening: Friday, August 31, 5 to 8 PMfolioeast presents the group show “Bold.” The show presents paintings, prints, and outdoor sculpture by artists Dennis Leri, Aurelio Torres, James DeMartis, Bill Kiriazis, Mary Antczak, Pamela Dove, Perry Burns, Jonathan Glynn, Barbara Groot, and David Rufo. The show will be held at the Jackson Carriage House in Amagansett and runs August 31 through September 3.Stephen WilkesTulla Booth Gallery, Sag HarborOpening: Friday, August 31, 6 to 8 PMTulla Booth Gallery in Sag Harbor presents Meet the Artist: Stephen Wilkes on Friday, August 31, from 6 to 8 PM. Wilkes will display his popular “Day to Night” series, including exciting images of the most beloved cities and sites of the world. Wilkes photographs from a stationary 50-foot crane. The exhibit will continue through September 27. For more info, visit www.tullaboothgallery.com.Drawing RoomThe Drawing Room, East HamptonThe Drawing Room Gallery in East Hampton presents works by artists Charles Jones, including early 20th Century photographs, and sculptures by Fiona Waterstreet. The show will open on Friday, August 31 and run through September 30. For more info, visit www.drawingroom-gallery.com.Michele DragonettiRoman Fine Art, East HamptonOpening: Saturday, September 1, 6 to 8 PMRoman Fine Art in East Hampton presents “Michele Dragonetti – Re-emergent.” Dragonetti’s second solo exhibition at the gallery once again highlights photographs from her Boat Hull series. The show runs through October 1.Artists SpeakThe Art Barge, AmagansettTalk: Wednesday, September 5, at 6 PMThe Victor D’Amico Institute of Art at The Art Barge in Amagansett presents the series Artists Speak, with Peter Spacek in conversation with Casey Dalene on Wednesday, September 5, at 6 PM. Peter Spacek was born in Germany and raised in California. His love of drawing brought him to New York to pursue a career in editorial illustration. Visit www.theartbarge.org. Share Photography by Michele Dragonettilast_img read more

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