Satran’s 10th-inning single moves Lamar to 2-0 start

first_img The 10th was a different story. With one out already, Arredondo singled a roller through the left side and was pushed to second when Chaneng Varela grounded out to third base with no play to try and get the lead runner.In the first pitch he saw, Satran laced a ball down the third base line that rolled into left field with plenty of room to score the winning run.“He had a good swing and just ripped one down the line. I feel sorry for their guys even though I feel great about winning because they really played great against us,” said head coach Jim Gilligan. Lamar jumped out to an early lead with a run in the first, but after that neither team surrendered a run until SEMO (0-2) tied it in the eighth. During the drought, only two base runners were able to get to second base and both were Redhawks.Jayson McKinley started for Big Red and took a no-decision after he worked through six innings with four hits allowed and six strikeouts. He surrendered no walks, which gives the Cardinals 12 innings from starters without a single walk.Jimmy Johnson (1-0) took credit for the win on his 2 2/3 frames with two hits and four strikeouts. He entered the game right after SEMO’s Branden Boggetto singled to left center to score Brian Lees and tied the game. He gave up a single up the middle to the first batter he faced (Garrett Gandolfo), but was able to force Ryan Rippee into a 6-4-3 double play.“His velocity was really good and threw a lot of strikes,” said Gilligan. “He did a great job.  He controlled his enthusiasm and I liked his dugout demeanor. Once he got back in, I think he settled down a little bit” Lamar sports informationBEAUMONT – It was another pitcher’s duel at Vincent-Beck Stadium, but it was a play at the plate that made the biggest mark of the game when Brendan Satran singled home Bryndan Arredondo from second base to give the Lamar baseball team a walk-off 2-1 victory in the 10th inning Saturday afternoon.The Cardinals (2-0), who will go for the sweep at 1 p.m. today, had a hit in the ninth inning, but before that no base knock had fallen since the first frame.center_img In his second inning to appear, he gave up a leadoff single, but stranded the runner there with three-straight punchouts. In his final frame, he walked a batter but first was as far as he got.Brett Brown was in between McKinley and Johnson. He worked 1 1/3 innings with one run allowed on two hits and two strikeouts.“I thought the pitchers not letting guys get the bat on the ball was the story of the game,” said Gilligan.Southeast Missouri starter Clay Chandler lasted into the eighth inning and gave up only two hits and two walks.“Chandler was magnificent against us. When you throw that good, you deserve to get the win, but the same could be said for McKinley,” said Gilligan. “Both of the starters didn’t get their money’s worth, but was just another well-played game.”The loss was tagged to Justin Murphy (0-1), who worked 1 2/3 innings with one run on three hits.Newcomer Reid Russell drove in the first run of the game with a single through the left side that scored Jacoby Middleton, who reached on a single through the same hole.  Middleton was moved to scoring position after Jake Nash drew a base on balls.Nash notched the fourth hit of the ball game in the ninth, but stranded when he was rolled up in a double play.Both Boggetto and Gandolfo had two hits in five trips for the game, and Brian Lees had two base knocks in four plate appearances.“We’re going to have a tough time [today] if we let up in the least,” said Gilligan. “They can play. I’m impressed with their program.”After the series concludes on Sunday, the Cardinals will turn their attention to Monday with a talented Arizona club coming in before the highly-anticipated contest with nationally-ranked LSU on Wednesday.last_img read more

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Local chamber awarded coveted 5-Star rating

first_imgBy Ken Stickneyken.stickney@panews.comThe U.S. Chamber of Commerce has awarded the Greater Port Arthur Chamber of Commerce with 5-Star Accreditation, honoring it as one of the top 1 percent chambers nationwide. “The result of our hard work is evidenced by this impressive rating. But in truth, we should all be extraordinarily proud of this milestone achievement. It was a true team effort,” he said.Chamber Chairman Jeff Hayes said the Greater Port Arthur Chamber’s accreditation rise has been meteoric. Local chambers are rated accredited, 3-Star, 4-Star or 5-Star. An accrediting board of the national chamber makes final determination. The local chamber earned 4-star status just last year.The process to become a 5-star chamber has been continuing for more than two years, with extensive organizational work. Hayes credited former chairwomen Barbara Phillips and Marian Ruiz for organizing and encouraging the successful effort.“We reviewed polices and procedures that would help use become a better chamber,” Phillips said Friday. “Committees worked diligently for a couple of years.” Chamber President Bill McCoy made the announcement in an issued statement late Friday.“This program makes you self-evaluate every aspect of the chamber. In the past year this effort has led to the creation of the Hispanic Business Council, the Contractors Business Development Group as well as a membership committee that is growing the chamber through new sales and retention,” McCoy said. “The process has taught our staff and volunteers how to research, plan and execute an aggressive and valuable chamber program.”McCoy said chamber staff, board members and volunteers spent “countless hours” completing the accreditation process, demonstrating competency in nine core areas ranging from finance to facilities.center_img Most important, she suggested, was not only the review of policies and procedures and production of documents but the actual achievements of forming groups that made effective changes to serve more Greater Port Arthur people, such as the Hispanic Council and Business Development Council.“Both came out of this process,” she said.“We hope we can continue to get such recognition and do some great things for the local economy,” Hayes said.McCoy, Hayes and Phillips all praised chamber staff members for effective work.last_img read more

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Do our city leaders have the ‘right stuff?’

first_img For Port Arthur to have a chance at redemption, we must elect individuals who understand business and can work together for the whole city — every citizen. It will not be easy.First, invigorate professionals with the ability to handle this turnaround, understand what it will take to achieve it and have the passion to run for office. That is another issue altogether.Rich Macke is publisher of the Port Arthur News. What’s interesting about these 10 traits is they are similar to the top 10 traits of a successful businessperson. So let’s take this list above and compare it to the individuals currently elected to sit on Port Arthur City Council. Only four of the nine — seats 6, 7, 8 and mayor — have business background and experience. Either multiple districts or the city as a whole elects these office holders.That means the majority of city council officer holders have either minimal or zero background in business. Most of these people are elected by one district with very low voter turnout.When communities seek to rejuvenate, revive and revitalize their city, they need to look for a common factor when electing candidates. Do they have solid business sense? Because if they do not, how can they understand the workings of a $60 million business, which is the yearly budget for the city of Port Arthur. Answer: , They cannot.When communities continue to elect individuals without business background, pushing to promote and elect activists with one political goal or aspiration, the city as a whole is affected negatively. Compare where Port Arthur is today to where it was 10, 15 and 20 years ago. The answer is simple as this has been the trend, for many years now. Politics is not for everyone. For some who think it is, it may not be for them either. Citizens of communities across the nation struggle to find the right candidates to vote for who will represent them faithfully and effectively.Effective and foreword-thinking council members are difficult to find, especially here in Port Arthur. I don’t think some understand what their elected position is, or what it takes to be effective.Yes, being a city council member is a difficult position. Understanding that the position must walk a fine line between making decisions on constituents’ behalf and what the city needs can be taxing. Knowing the difference is harder. Excluding their own personal feelings is probably hardest of allcenter_img Studies conducted by multiple state municipality groups on what defines an effective city council member identified 10 traits successful city council members have in common. Here they are:Self-care: Council work is uniquely difficult and it is easy for elected officials to neglect themselves physically, emotionally, relationally. Public life can be taxing and one can’t be effective and make good community decisions when self-care is absent. Sure, you want to take care of your city: Take care of yourself first!Know-it-alls (NOT!):  There is an ego boost when elected that brings a misguided sense of “I should know it all.” Well, they don’t, and six of the smartest words an elected official can use are: “I don’t understand; can you help?” We call it “teachability,” openness and a willingness to learn.A good council member studies, listens, and is willing to have preconceived ideas challenged. He’s open to staff, the public, even that council member he dislikes! He recognizes his own biases, prejudices and values.Good communicator: An effective councilmember communicates intelligently, articulately and thoughtfully. He or she is able to persuade and change opinions without bullying or manipulating. They build consensus and pull a council together, show colleagues they understand the issues and are able to logically explain how decisions are made.R.E.S.P.E.C.T.: More than “just a little bit,” an effective councilmember is respectful, polite and deferential toward all: fellow councilmembers, staff and the public —regardless of likes, dislikes friendships, politics. He doesn’t insult, attack or demand.Good loser: Our true character emerges when things don’t go our way. An effective public servant is emotionally and relationally mature and shows it when losing. He or she stays calm when a vote goes the ‘wrong’ way, respects voters and the process, even when she is on the minority side of a heartfelt issue. She remains statesmanlike in defeat.“Do you swear?” An effective council member puts the law, code and citizens first, regardless of personal benefit or bias. He chooses to set aside preconceived ideas and personal likes/dislikes and he consistently achieves the highest level of adherence to his oath of office. He respects state law, city bylaws, council rules and parliamentary procedures. He knows when to recuse himself from the process to protect his integrity and that of the council.Pitchforks and torches: A good council member emerges when he votes for something in the best interests of the city while public outcry demands the opposite. Some of the most important decisions an elected official makes may be counter to a barrage of angry emails and public comment.A good councilmember also recognizes an angry mob does not necessarily reflect the view of a quiet majority. He understands a flood of emails does not necessarily confirm public opinion in general and makes their decisions based on merit, not emotion.Separation of powers: An effective council member respects the role and function of the public, city staff and the city’s executive. Most council/mayor/staff problems occur when those boundaries are not honored. He knows the limits to his authority.High personal standards of character and ethics: An effective council member doesn’t embarrass fellow colleagues with inappropriate conduct or activities. They exercise personal self-discipline to never bring dishonor to the elected position.Picks up the phone: Responds to citizens politely and promptly and remembers that “they” are the boss. Values their contributions, comments and concerns and responds accordingly.last_img read more

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL: Lamar promotes Miles to assistant coach

first_img Miles, who played four seasons for the University of San Diego while earning a bachelor’s degree in ethnic studies, was an all-state player in high school at Dallas Skyline. Miles recently earned his master’s degree in criminal justice from Lamar University. Miles comes from a family with an impressive athletic background. His brother C.J., a member of the Toronto Raptors, is in his 13th season in the NBA. His sister Andrea, played basketball at Rogers State after originally attending Alabama State on a volleyball scholarship. His sister Ashlan is a member of the LU women’s basketball team. Lamar sports informationBEAUMONT – Cameron Miles, who served as director of basketball operations for the Lamar University women’s basketball team, has been promoted to assistant coach, LU head coach Robin Harmony announced Wednesday.center_img In his two seasons at LU, Miles has been a member of a staff that helped lead the Cardinals to a Southland Conference regular-season championship this past season and to a berth in a national postseason tournament both years. This past season, LU was 22-8 overall and 17-1 in Southland Conference play, as LU won the Southland title outright for the first time in program history.“I am happy that Cam will remain at Lamar University,” Harmony said. “He knows our system, he is a hard worker and he is loyal. In addition, the student-athletes like and respect him.”last_img read more

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Harold Anthony Guilbeau

first_img A Mass of Christian Burial will be held Tuesday, November 5, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church in Port Neches with Reverend Shane Baxter officiating.Entombment will follow at Greenlawn Memorial Park.Visitation for family and friends will be from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., with a Rosary recited at 6:00 p.m., Monday, November 4, 2019 at Levingston Funeral Home in Port Neches.Harold was preceded in death by his sisters, Theresa Cervenka and Frankie Reyna. Harold Anthony Guilbeau, 81, of Port Arthur, Texas passed away Friday, November 1, 2019 at Bonne Vie in Port Arthur, Texas.Harold was born August 25, 1938 in Port Arthur, Texas to Frank Guilbeau and Mae Boudreaux Guilbeau.He was a lifelong resident of this area and a member of St. Elizabeth Catholic Church, Port Neches Knights of Columbus Council #2461, and Sertoma Club. He was on the Board at the Caplin Center, Gulf Credit Union, and Mardi Gras of Southeast Texas.He was also on the School Board at St. Catherine.Harold retired from Firestone in Orange as a Lab Technician with 35 years of service.center_img Surviving relatives include his wife of 60 years, Charlene Guilbeau of Port Arthur, Texas; 3 daughters, Tracie Swonke and husband Dr. Pat of Houston, Texas, Jill Schwertner and husband Terry of Port Neches, Texas, Cherissa LaVergne and husband Ryan of Spring, Texas;grandchildren, Grant Swonke, Terran Swonke, Brett Swonke, Paige Broussard, Reid LaVergne, and Grace LaVergne.Memorial contributions may be made to St. Elizabeth Catholic Church or your Charity of Choice.last_img read more

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PAPD: Attempted murder suspect being sought locally

first_imgA man wanted for attempted murder may be hiding in Port Arthur, authorities said.The Port Arthur Police Department is asking for the public’s help locating Eren Jacory Wilson (aka “Stank”), who has an outstanding attempted murder warrant out of Opelousas, La. PAPD is being assisted by U.S. Marshals, who can contact them at 409-839-2581.Crime Stoppers of SETX can be reached at 409-833-TIPS (8477). You won’t be asked your name and may be eligible for a cash reward. Make an anonymous tip by downloading the P3 Tips app on a smartphone. Police said Wilson is a person of interest in numerous crimes in Port Arthur and surrounding areas, adding the suspect is known to spend time in Port Arthur, Orange and the Houston area.Police describe Wilson as a black male with light to medium skin tone, 5’ 09” tall and weighs approximately 150 pounds.center_img Those with information on Wilson’s whereabouts, call the Criminal Investigation Division at 409-983-8624 or 409-983-8600 after business hours.last_img read more

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OUT IN THE YARD — Consider container gardening for produce

first_img Many pot choices are available. Half-whisky barrels, foam ice chests, 5-gallon paint buckets, wheelbarrows, ceramic pots, and a bag of soil cut with openings for plants are some suggestions.Clay pots are porous and dry out quickly as do small containers. Be creative and look for containers around your home. All pots need a minimum of four holes drilled in the bottom. Useful side holes drilled ¼-½ inch from the bottom for additional drainage can be done. Without drainage, the plant roots will rot.Always use good quality, new potting mix inside your pots. Diseases and weed seeds hide in the heavy garden soil. Potting mix is lightweight, drains well and has disease- and weed-                 free properties. When using larger pots, fill the pot where it will grow. It will become heavy when filled with the mix, so rollers used on the bottom of the pot are useful to move it. Do you dream of salad with fresh, homegrown tomatoes?Do you live in an apartment with a sunny patio that gets 6-8 hours of sun a day? Is it difficult to bend down? Do you want to grow a garden but lack time and energy for a large garden? If yes is your answer, then container gardening is for you!Choose a new pot or you can reuse an older pot. To reuse an old pot, you should wash out the soil, disinfect the pot and let dry. Line the bottom of the pot with a coffee filter or used fabric softener sheet to keep the potting mix from washing out. Small rocks covered with landscape cloth can be placed in the larger pot to help with drainage. Slightly moisten potting mix to repot. Add a bottom layer of the mix adjusting to support the plant’s roots. Put the plant in the pot and fill in around the sides packing the soil lightly. Leave a 1-2 inch headspace in the pot for watering.A 6-10 inch pot is good for growing green onions, parsley and herbs. Smaller pots are appropriate for herbs, lettuce and radishes. Plant dwarf tomatoes and chard in 1-2 gallon pots. Use 5 gallon pots for tomatoes, peppers and eggplant. Cucumbers can be planted in 5 gallon containers but need an additional place to grow as a vine.center_img Minimize disease by only watering your soil, not the leaves. Pour water in the soil until the water runs out of the drainage hole. Water your pot when the top ½ inch of soil is dry. If you live upstairs, place pots on gravel lined, trays to catch overflow water. Your downstairs neighbors will appreciate you.Reach Jefferson County Master Gardener, Eileen Slater, at jcmgenslater@gmail.com or call the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service at 409-835-8461.last_img read more

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Curley Ezkiel McZeal Jr.

first_imgCurley Ezkiel McZeal, Jr., 71 of Port Arthur was born July 23, 1948 in Port Arthur, Texas. He was a 1966 graduate of Lincoln High School and was a US Navy Veteran.He departed this life Tuesday, June 30, 2020 at Mid Jefferson Extended Care Hospital.Funeral service will be 11 a.m. Saturday, July 11, 2020 at Gabriel Funeral Home Chapel with visitation from 9 a.m. until service time.Burial will be in Houston National Cemetery.last_img

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Dave Malloy on the ‘Simple Beauty and Whirling Spectacle’ of Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812

first_img View Comments That delicate balance of tone is one of the most important things in the work for me, and something director Rachel Chavkin and I talked about a lot. Often when I read a piece of classical literature, I’m simultaneously enraptured and amused; so often a moment of “man, people were ridiculous back then” is closely followed by a moment of “oh my God, I said that yesterday.” There’s a real beauty in reading these works ironically and sincerely at the same time, both commenting on and communing with another time and place. And ultimately, for me it’s the communion, the humanity in these timeless stories, that sticks with me. A few songs were written for specific performers…Brittain Ashford is a singer/songwriter I’ve known for years; some of her songs about heart-breakingly fierce loyalty and love reminded me of Sonya. It took a few beers to convince her to be in a show, but once she signed on, I wrote “Sonya Alone” specifically for her. Natasha’s Act One aria, “No One Else,” wasn’t in the Ars Nova version of the show; only after working with Phillipa Soo and really getting to know her voice did I get inspired to write a true Natasha song, tailored to Pippa’s talents. Show Closed This production ended its run on March 2, 2014 I started working on Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812 in the summer of 2011; the idea had been in my head since reading War and Peace while playing piano on a cruise ship four years earlier. One particular sliver of the book seemed to me a perfect musical; it had the classic two-couples structure, only in this story the second couple (after Natasha and Anatole) was Pierre and…God? Himself? Humanity? Natasha? So there was that existential throughline, and the fact that these two disparate stories only intersect at the end, flipping the story around in the last moments. I made a rough outline in my head and then moved on to other things. Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812 The opening song, “Prologue,” was actually one of the last to be written. Originally the show started right in the thick of Pierre’s self-loathing. After a couple workshops, a constant piece of feedback was that it took people a while to know who was who and where we were, so we decided to add a proper prologue, a la Romeo & Juliet, laying things out as clearly as possible, employing the time honored preschool music tradition of the cumulative song. To my surprise, it worked. It’s probably the most “musical theater” song in the show, both in style and tone. So the show starts with this fun but kind of false, trick beginning; as it goes on, the musical and emotional trajectory gets further and further away from where we started. About the author: One of the most critically acclaimed new shows of the year is an operatic and electropop throwback to Tsarist Russia, Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812. Dave Malloy is the composer, librettist, orchestrator and original star of this innovative, immersive off-Broadway musical, which was inspired by a juicy subplot of Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Although Malloy recently vacated the role of Pierre, his work lives on for packed audiences at the pop-up tented Russian supper club Kazino, where Comet runs through September 1. In an exclusive essay for Broadway.com, Malloy explains the events that led him to writing the crowdpleasing hit, and why he thinks Tolstoy would have been enamored by the Russian-inspired musical.center_img This novelistic text also resulted in music that freely combines song forms with a sort of accompanied recitative style that I probably learned from singing in a jazz choir in high school. We sang a lot of “vocalese,” in which lyrics are written for famous jazz solos (Lambert, Hendricks & Ross are my favorite purveyors of the style). This style fit both the classical, operatic sections and the more contemporary, electronica ostinatos (introduced by the entrance of Anatole) of the score. Another main intention in writing the score was to feature the band, both by writing them very exposed and soloistic parts, and staging them throughout the space. One of my favorite parts of previews was moving around to sit in front of the oboe seat, the strings seat, and so on, and really live with each of our musicians for a while. Anatole’s last note (a high C# “Petersburg!”) was written in a spastic moment of composer frustration at not knowing how to end the song. I forgot it was there until we came to it in rehearsal, and Lucas Steele sang it without a second thought. We were picking our jaws off the ground. The opera-within-the-opera too was written with the original performers, Gelsey Bell and Paul Pinto; both are experimental music vocalists, who regularly employ extended technique in their work. The challenge there was to produce something that pokes fun of avant-garde opera (which I sometimes love), but is nevertheless grotesque and amazing in its own right. After the Ars Nova run, we were fortunate enough to have Howard and Janet Kagan transfer the show to Kazino, a space custom-built for it. It’s been incredible to see the show grow into this more expansive and elegant space, and see each designer’s vision fully realized. Also the addition of an amazing ensemble and a fantastic music director, Or Matias, have made the score richer and fuller; and watching Rachel fill the space and create moments of such simple beauty and whirling spectacle has been an honor. And of course, the occasional cellphone hurling has kept us all on our toes…I’m sure Tolstoy would have loved that tale. From the start, the intention was to really embrace Tolstoy’s language, keeping his peculiar way of writing (made all the more peculiar through translation) intact, in which every blush, sigh, laugh and tear is lovingly detailed. Starting from this text, I wrote lyrics combing word-for-word Tolstoy, free adaptation, and some modern flourishes (“In nineteenth century Russia we write letters”). I’ve often joked that in Tolstoy I had the best collaborator, because he’s both brilliant and dead. I never really believed it would happen…then I met Ars Nova. They had seen my show Beowulf – A Thousand Years of Baggage, and after meeting with them a few times and doing a concert there, I was commissioned to write a piece. I proposed the Tolstoy idea, expecting/half-hoping they’d ask for something more manageable. But to my surprise and terror, they were thrilled by the idea, and off we went. Related Showslast_img read more

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Watch Meryl Streep Gush About the New Song Stephen Sondheim Wrote Just for Her for Into the Woods

first_imgMeryl Streep has it all: the actress has won approx. 1,497 Academy Awards, she’s starred in some of the most iconic films of all time and now legendary composer Stephen Sondheim has written a song just for her. We die. Streep sat down with EXTRA’s Jerry Penacoli to spill the beans about the new tune, which is for her upcoming role as The Witch in Rob Marshall and James Lapine’s big-screen adaptation of the Broadway musical Into the Woods. “He gave me the manuscript of [the song] and wrote, ‘Don’t f*ck it up,'” she revealed. Streep also talked about her performance as Beverly Weston in the forthcoming August: Osage County film. Check out the full interview below! View Commentslast_img

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