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RIP BBM BlackBerry Messenger has been shut down for good


first_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Let’s hold a moment of silence for an old friend. BBM has delivered its last ping and closed its digital doors forever.Emtek, the company that has been running BBM for the last three years, announced last month that it would shut down the messaging service on May 31. That date has, of course, now passed.Related: Best smartphoneThe Indonesian media conglomerate took over development of BBM in 2016, with plans to rehaul the app by introducing a bunch of new features. Unfortunately, the revamp wasn’t enough to propel BBM into competition with other more popular messaging services.BBM was a pioneer in secure, internet-based instant messaging, long before the likes of iMessage, WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger entered the arena. It underpinned the BlackBerry operating system and remained a solid reason loyalists wanted to keep hold of their devices amid the explosion of touchscreen iOS and Android devices.In a blog post, Emtek lamented that the technology industry is fluid and that “in spite of our substantial efforts, users have moved on to other platforms” while new users have been difficult to draw in.Blackberry has tried to face up to its competition directly in the past. In 2018, the company sued Facebook for infringing on its messaging patents with Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp and Instagram. The suit included complaints regarding Facebook’s use of a notification dot to display unread messages, timestamps and issues pertaining to security and privacy.However, BBM isn’t going away completely. The paid enterprise version of the app will continue, and to hold on to its more loyal users, Blackberry has taken steps to open it up for personal use.BBM Enterprise – or BBMe – is free of the games, channels and ads that cluttered BBM and includes features such as secure messaging, file sharing, voice, video and real-time notifications.CMO Mark Wilson said: “While we respect Emtek’s decision, we’re disappointed the platform did not thrive and grow as expected. After much consideration, we decided that BBM’s loyal users should continue to have a secure messaging platform that they can trust.”Related: WhatsApp alternativesIf you’re not ready to let BBM go just yet, BBM Enterprise is available for download now on Android, iOS, Windows and Mac. The app costs nothing for the first year. A subscription is then $2.49 for six months. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more


US not ready to make a trade deal with China Trump says


first_img Shannon Pettypiece and Iain Marlow US President Donald Trump, left, and Japan’s Emperor Naruhito attend a state banquet at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo on Monday.Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images Join the conversation → U.S. ‘not ready’ to make a trade deal with China, Trump says American tariffs on Chinese goods ‘could go up very, very substantially, very easily’ Bloomberg News Twitter Featured Stories What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Comment 3 Comments More Sponsored By: advertisement The U.S. isn’t ready to make a trade deal with China, President Donald Trump said while on a state visit to Japan.“I think they probably wish they made the deal that they had on the table before they tried to renegotiate it,” Trump said Monday at a joint press conference in Tokyo alongside Japanese leader Shinzo Abe. “They would like to make a deal. We’re not ready to make a deal.”Trump said American tariffs on Chinese goods “could go up very, very substantially, very easily.” His comments came after trade talks between the two countries stalled earlier this month. Each side has since blamed the other, and Trump has threatened billions more in tariffs.Trump said businesses were leaving China for countries without tariffs, including the U.S. and Asian neighbours including Japan. Still, he also expressed optimism that the world’s biggest economies would eventually reach an agreement.“I think sometime in the future China and the United States will absolutely have a great trade deal, and we look forward to that,” Trump said. “Because I don’t believe that China can continue to pay these, really, hundreds of billions of dollars in tariffs. I don’t believe they can do that.”New RhetoricRelated Stories:UPDATE 4-Trump says trade deal ‘possible’ with China’s Xi, tariffs could be lowerWRAPUP 2-‘Back on track’: China and U.S. agree to restart trade talksRPT-REFILE-WRAPUP 2-U.S. hopes to re-launch China trade talks, will not accept conditions on tariffsFor some time, the U.S. “has had various voices on China-U.S. trade talks. Sometimes it is said that an agreement will be reached soon, and sometimes that it is difficult to reach an agreement,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said in Beijing Monday when asked about Trump’s comments.“In the same period of time, China’s position has always been the same,” Lu said. “China has always believed that the differences between any two countries should of course be resolved through friendly consultations and negotiations.”Over the weekend, China pushed back at the perception that Trump’s tariffs are hurting its economy.Higher tariffs will have a “very limited” impact, and would hurt the U.S. about as much, according to Guo Shuqing, head of China’s banking and insurance regulator. Guo is the highest-ranking Chinese financial official to publicly comment on the trade standoff since talks deteriorated.A commentary published by the official Xinhua News Agency accused the U.S. of “scapegoating” China for its trade imbalance and even some domestic economic issues, as Chinese state media urges unified resistance to foreign pressure.“The United States is attempting to squeeze an unequal trade deal out of China, using measures such as tariff hikes and targeting its tech companies,” it said, while praising Beijing’s “utmost sincerity” in the negotiations.China has escalated its anti-U.S. discourse since the talks faltered and Trump blacklisted Huawei Technologies Co. and scores of its affiliates earlier this month in a bid to stymie its access to the U.S. market. His administration is considering restrictions on as many as five other Chinese tech companies.With assistance from Dandan LiBloomberg.com Email Share this storyU.S. ‘not ready’ to make a trade deal with China, Trump says Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Recommended For YouBritish Airways suspends flights to Cairo for seven days’I don’t have words’: Boss of torched Japan animation studio mourns bright, young staffThousands in pro-police rally as Hong Kong braces for another mass protestBritain calls ship seizure ‘hostile act’ as Iran releases video of captureECB to cut rates in Sept, QE 2.0 still on the cards May 27, 20197:44 AM EDT Filed under News Economy Reddit Facebook ← Previous Next →last_img read more


BCs dirty money crackdown puts a damper on Vancouvers oncerollicking casinos


first_imgB.C.’s dirty money crackdown puts a damper on Vancouver’s once-rollicking casinos Vancouver-area casinos for years had been accepting millions of dollars in questionable cash from gamblers holding suitcases bulging with bills ← Previous Next → Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg Twitter Sponsored By: Featured Stories Canada ignored its gigantic money laundering problem for years — and lawyers fanned the flames Bloomberg News 4 Comments Canada admits it has a money laundering problem. Now it’s pledging to fix it April 29, 201912:22 PM EDT Filed under News FP Street A cyclist rides past the Parq Vancouver hotel and casino in Vancouver.Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Comment advertisement In January 2018, the government-owned British Columbia Lottery Corp., responsible for managing casinos in the province, hastily implemented new measures requiring gamblers to provide a bank receipt on the source of funds for any buy-ins amounting to $10,000 or more within a 24-hour period. It also hired Ernst & Young to audit three years of transactions at River Rock but concluded in February that “there was no systemic pattern of money-laundering activity.”Be that as it may, gambling at River Rock isn’t the roaring business it once was either — the anti-money laundering measures appear an irritant to patrons.Quick Changes“The changes in procedures were implemented extremely, extremely quickly,” Great Canadian Gaming Chief Executive Officer Rod Baker told investors on a call last May. “I think it’s even more challenging for our guests when they’ve been used to doing things a certain way for a certain amount of time, and then all of a sudden, you know, they get turned away and they got to figure out —they got to go to the bank that day.”The company reported last month that table drop — the amount of money patrons used at tables to buy chips — fell 16 per cent in 2018 to $298 million at its 10 properties in British Columbia, driven by a decline at River Rock. Revenue from British Columbia also dipped 3 per cent due in part to the new source-of-funds procedures, it said.Table drop — the amount of money patrons used at tables to buy chips — fell 16 per cent in 2018 to $298 million at 10 properties in British Columbia, driven by a decline at River Rock.center_img Reddit Email If not for its untimely launch, Parq would’ve seemed a sure bet in a city that’d become a magnet for wealthy Asian high rollers known to drop more than $500,000 — source undeclared — at gaming tables.The shimmery copper-hued casino-cum-hotel complex finally offered an upscale option in downtown Vancouver with a second-floor entrance leading directly into the neighbouring BC Place stadium — on opening night, VIPs waltzed across for a Coldplay concert.Parq was everything its kitschy rivals with their all-you-can-eat buffets in the suburbs were not: its understated decor was bathed in natural light, its elevated outdoor park boasted 200 real pines unlike the copses of fake trees at the busy River Rock Casino Resort near the airport. Its fine dining options included tea buds painted in gold. It’s two luxe hotels in one: a 329-room JW Marriott and the boutique-styled Douglas with 188 rooms.Vancouver had also appeared a uniquely promising market. “The revenues in Vancouver have grown consistently within the past 10 years; pretty much every other market has not seen a raise in table revenues,” Scott Menke, chief executive officer of Paragon Gaming Holding Co., the Las Vegas-based casino developer and operator that spearheaded Parq’s construction, told Bloomberg News ahead of its opening in 2017. Paragon abandoned the underperforming asset in February this year, selling its stake to PBC.Horgan CrackdownBritish Columbia Premier John Horgan’s government has been spearheading Canada’s anti-money laundering charge, and its hiring of an independent investigator to probe the gambling industry coincided almost to the day with Parq’s ill-timed opening in September 2017.Explosive details have filtered out: at Great Canadian Gaming Corp.’s River Rock, dubbed the “epicentre” of hot money by the investigator, $13.5 million in 20-dollar bills had been accepted in a single month in 2015 and couriers were delivering cash to patrons in late-night drop offs. In another instance, a gambler was permitted to convert $3.1 million, mostly in twenties, into chips at Gateway Casinos & Entertainment Ltd.’s Starlight Casino.Guests arrive at the River Rock Casino Resort in Richmond, British Columbia. When Parq Vancouver, a glimmering waterfront casino, opened amid much to-do in late 2017, few would’ve anticipated that a dirty money crackdown was about to throw the city’s roaring gambling business into turmoil.Vancouver-area casinos for years had been accepting millions of dollars in questionable cash from gamblers showing up with suitcases and hockey bags bulging with bills, according to British Columbia Attorney General David Eby. But new rules implemented last year to more tightly identify sources of funds have put a damper on that rollicking trade.“The anti-money laundering regulations in British Columbia have been a problem,” says Andrew Hood, a Toronto-based equity analyst at M Capital Partners Inc. who covers Dundee Corp., one of Parq’s two owners. “The regulations were supposed to cut down on illicit gambling but, of course, that hurt volumes across casinos.” Canada admits it has a money laundering problem. Now it’s pledging to fix it Toronto housing has become magnet for money launderers, with $28 billion in real estate bought by anonymous owners: study B.C.’s money laundering problem may involve billions of dollars, documents say For Parq, one of the province’s largest-ever private developments, the clampdown came at a delicate time. The plan was to replace costly construction financing with cheaper debt after opening but business picked up slower than expected amid the new restrictions. It lost nearly $153 million (US$114 million) in 2018, according to a March 28 Dundee filing. Now Parq’s in a race to refinance debt in order to make an interest payment this week on a second-lien loan, according to S&P Global Ratings.Loan PaymentParq Holdings LP has a US$150 million second-lien term-loan that was arranged by a syndicate of financial institutions led by Credit Suisse Securities in 2014, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The amount of interest isn’t disclosed, but Parq had deferred an interest payment by one month to April 30 and its ability to pay hinges on the company refinancing its debt, S&P said earlier this month when it downgraded Parq Holdings LP to CCC, eight notches below investment grade, from B-.“We still believe that, absent a debt recapitalization, the company will be unable to materially address its high fixed charges and financial sustainability,” S&P said, adding there’s a risk of a payment default or a debt restructuring within the next 12 months.Ottawa OwnerPrivately held PBC Group, an Ottawa-based real estate developer, is the majority owner of Parq with 63 per cent. Dundee, a Toronto-based public holding company with investments in agriculture, resources and real estate, owns the remainder. PBC and Dundee declined requests to be interviewed for this story.Parq’s US$220 million first-lien term-loan due in December 2020, which would be paid first in the event of a default, is down just one per cent over the last 12 months, according to Bloomberg data. That may be because creditors believe Parq’s assets are worth more than the loans — the resort generated $43.5 million in revenue in the three months ended Dec. 31, up 36 per cent from the same period in 2017, according to disclosures by Dundee. Interest on its senior debt hovers around 10 per cent at US$22 million a year.The Parq hotel and casino in Vancouver. Share this storyB.C.’s dirty money crackdown puts a damper on Vancouver’s once-rollicking casinos Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg Natalie Obiko Pearson and Paula Sambo Related Stories Join the conversation → Facebook More B.C.’s money laundering problem may involve billions of dollars, documents say Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg Meanwhile, Dundee has said it’s seeking to bring in a new partner to Parq by Tuesday. All told, investors had pumped more than $1 billion in long-term debt and equity into Parq by the end of 2018, according to filings. Dundee, which put in $142 million of that, has said it doesn’t expect to fully recover its investment and that it could take another year or two before Parq is closer to stable operations.“They don’t necessarily think they’re going to get their money back,” said Hood. “But they do think that they’ll get a substantial portion back and that’s why they don’t just give up and sell it.”–With assistance from Esteban Duarte.Bloomberg.com last_img read more


Energicas Ego Sport Black is their newest 150 mph electric motorcycle


Energica took to the 2018 Intermot motorcycle show in Cologne, Germany to show off the newest 2019 models of their high power sport bikes. The newest line of Energica electric motorcycles combine impressive speeds and performance with novel tech upgrades that more closely than ever resemble the professional Energica electric motorcycles used for racing. more…The post Energica’s Ego Sport Black is their newest 150 mph electric motorcycle appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forward


Watch Jaguar IPace Electric SUV Take On Snow Ice Video


first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Porsche Taycan Wagon Spotted Playing In Snow Unique in this video is an opening overview of the car. It discusses various topics such as range, price, interior features and more. Really, this is an excellent test drive review video of the I-Pace. That is, until the video clock hits around 6 minutes. Then, the video changes over to snow and ice testing, as well as lots of sideways sliding.Controllable rotation? Donuts? It sure looks like it’s a load of fun to drive the I-Pace in the slick stuff, provided you choose the right settings.Give the video a watch. If donuts aren’t you’re thing fret not, the review and overview section is definitely worth a watch. It may well be the most informative and entertaining I-Pace video you’ll ever watch.Video description:The Jaguar I-Pace EV400 is a dual-motor all-wheel-drive electric car designed for high-speed cornering as well as light off-roading, but how does it work on snow and ice? We take the I-Pace into the cold, to have some quality donut time.Driving Sports produces exclusive automotive reviews, news and motorsports for broadcast, web, mobile and set-top boxes Winter Test Of 5 Electric SUV/Crossovers Reveals Real Range Tesla Model 3 RWD Tested In Snow & From Stopped On Hill: Video Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 25, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News How does the electric cat fare on snow & ice?Let’s find out.The Jaguar I-Pace electric SUV sports AWD, so it should tackle snowy situations without much of an issue, but ice is far from an ideal driving surface.More Wintry EV Newslast_img read more


Biggest Delivery Wave In Tesla History Is Underway Says Musk


first_imgThe email, which went out today, states:“What has made this particularly difficult is that Europe and China are simultaneously experiencing the same massive increase in delivery volume that North America experienced last year. In some locations, the delivery rate is over 600% higher than its previous peak!”Musk added that this delivery push is the “biggest wave in Tesla’s history” and “won’t be repeated in subsequent quarters.” Let’s just use the proper word here:EPIC!Source: Business Insider Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 22, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Let’s all just ride this here wave.Tesla CEO Elon Musk emailed all Tesla employees to detail an unprecedented delivery push.The Tesla delivery wave is higher than ever and this is gonna be epic. Of course, it’s driven largely by the Tesla Model 3.More Tesla News Tesla Increases Pricing On Most Cars, But Just By A Bit Work Now At Full Steam On Tesla Gigafactory 3 In China: Video Source: Electric Vehicle News Top Five Reasons Why Consumers Buy Tesla Cars: Videolast_img read more


Formula Es Di Grassi Frijns Lock Horns In Twitter Spat


first_imgABB FIA Formula E drivers Lucas di Grassi and Robin Frijns have clashed on Twitter over the incident that removed both drivers from contention in last weekend’s Sanya ePrix. Source: Electric Vehicle News Audi motorsport boss Dieter Gass also expressed his disgruntlement with the situation in Sanya on his Facebook page.He wrote: “Not happy with the outcome of the ePrix in Sanya! Buemi’s penalty was no penalty!“It only moved him back to the position he was in before eliminating two Audis in front of him, so where is the penalty? Rather an invitation than a penalty!“Very difficult to digest! Formula E must be careful not to diverge into a demolition derby – some dangerous precedents have been set now! I need to admit, I am worried!” BMW Andretti’s Antonio Felix da Costa also had his say on the matter.Sims 30sec penalty in Chile, when contact wasnt sure it was made and Mortara still finishes 4th. Lotterer takes me and JEV out of the race in Santiago and gets nothing. JEV overspeed under FCY gets a fine, not time penalty. Nothing against these drivers. Just want consistency— Antonio Felix da Costa (@afelixdacosta) March 25, 2019center_img The lack of aerodynamic aids on the Gen2 car and the narrow street circuits they race on means FE drivers make more contact than the average single-seater series.Sam Bird lost his Hong Kong E-Prix victory after a clash with Andre Lotterer, while reigning champion Jean-Eric Vergne has previously criticised the contact as “not motorsport”.In the latest race at Sanya, Nissan e.dams driver Sebastien Buemi collided with Frijns in an incident that took out di Grassi, earning Buemi a 10-second penalty.That led to Audi driver di Grassi taking to Twitter to share his thoughts, with Envision Virgin Racing man Frijns hitting back.Just to be clear on how penalties are not fair in Formula E at the moment, Buemi was running 8th, crashes with Frinjs which then take me out of the race. Buemi goes to 6th place, receives a 10s penalty and finishes 8th scoring 4 points. Frijs gets nothing by moving under braking.— LUCAS DI GRASSI (@LucasdiGrassi) March 25, 2019 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 30, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more


Audi ETron Gets Lower Than Expected 204Mile EPA Range Rating


first_img Audi Q2 E-Tron Electric Car Caught Testing In the Snow It’s not out to impress on paper, as the automaker manages real-world expectations.The Audi e-tron now has an EPA estimate for its electric range ahead of its U.S. on-sale date in May. Long billed by pundits as Audi’s long-awaited answer to Tesla, the government agency’s range figure won’t have anyone shaking up in Palo Alto. Or Coventry.More Audi EV News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 4, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News Audi said Thursday the e-tron will have an estimated 204-mile range for the U.S. market. That pales with the Jaguar I-Pace‘s 234-mile range estimate and the Tesla Model X‘s 295-mile figure on the most-efficient 100D model. It even comes up short against the Chevrolet Bolt and Hyundai Kona, just to name a few. Not a great look for an EV with a 95-kW battery and a $75,000 base price. But Audi says that burying the bigger picture of the e-tron, which should be charge time and real-world range.The automaker said in its press release that the e-tron uses 88 percent of its 95-kWh capacity for, “battery longevity, repeatable performance and peak charging power for longer amounts of time during the charge cycle.” And Audi claims with a 150-kWh charger, the e-tron can add 54 miles of range in 10 minutes, or 163 miles in 30. Being part of the Volkswagen Group, Audi is also leveraging the growing Electrify America charging network with the capability to charge at up to 350 kWh, with a network of 2,00 chargers in 42 states planned to be in place by the end of 2019, the company said.So while the e-tron may not have the most spectacular numbers from the EPA – even the California Air Resources Board got 277 miles out of one –  Audi hopes its talk about real-world driving and quick charge times will satisfy the rational side of buyers, who can then get excited about the Amazon Alexa integration, towing capacity and that it isn’t just another Tesla. Audi e-tron GT Concept Overview: Video Audi E-Tron Gets Electric Range Rating From CARBlast_img read more


Robsons Bramall Lane future hangs in balance


first_imgShare on Twitter Bryan Robson’s future as the manager of Sheffield United was last night left hanging in the balance after talks with the club’s plc chairman, Kevin McCabe, were scheduled to continue for a second day. McCabe claimed that “it’s not my intention” to change the manager before Sunday’s FA Cup fifth-round tie against Middlesbrough but he also did little to dispel suggestions that he is looking to reshuffle the coaching staff, with Robson possibly moving upstairs.The former Middlesbrough and West Bromwich Albion manager has presided over only one victory in nine matches and, although Tuesday night’s goalless draw at The Hawthorns suggested that the players are behind him, the supporters need much more convincing. There were protests after the 0-0 draw at home to Scunthorpe on Saturday at Bramall Lane, with McCabe admitting that he could empathise with the fans’ frustrations.”I’m a supporter so I understand how they feel,” said McCabe, whose decision to replace Neil Warnock with Robson last May came as a surprise. “I bring my views as a supporter into this but it is as a chairman as well that I make a reasoned judgment. It’s not my intention [to change managers] but that’s just my view and we’re midway through talks. But at the same time we’re taking on board the disappointment we’ve all felt with how things have gone so far.”McCabe finds himself in a difficult position given that Robson was his appointment. Should he sack the former England captain, he would be admitting that he had made the wrong choice from the outset, something which many Blades fans suspected when Robson was unveiled nine months ago. Equally, McCabe cannot afford to allow a season which promised a return to the Premier League turn into a relegation battle without taking any action.That conundrum has fuelled rumours that McCabe will try to manoeuvre Robson into another position at the club. The chairman did not indicate whether that possibility was discussed at yesterday’s meeting but he confirmed that “reorganisation” was on the agenda.”Talks are ongoing, with Terry Robinson [the chairman], Bryan Robson and myself assessing the whole organisation of the football club,” said McCabe, who has succeeded in acquiring a tender to buy into the Hungarian club Ferencvaros. “We want to get an overview and see whether there is a need for reorganisation.”Robson is likely to resist any attempts to undermine his position or any of his backroom staff, and it was notable that he talked up the strength of his coaching team prior to yesterday’s meeting. “I have already got one of the best coaches in the country in Brian Kidd, and I also continue to coach,” said Robson.”In addition we have a fantastic fitness expert in Richard Hawkins who the West Bromwich players thought so highly of that they tried to persuade him to stay at The Hawthorns. However, Scott Sellars has left the academy coaching team so that is an area still to be filled.” Share on LinkedIn Shares00 Topics Share on Twitter This article is more than 11 years old Reuse this content Share on Messenger Soccer Share via Email Stuart James Share via Email Championship Wed 13 Feb 2008 20.24 EST First published on Wed 13 Feb 2008 20.24 EST news Championship 2007-08 Share on Facebook @StuartJamesGNM Soccer Robson’s Bramall Lane future hangs in balance Share on Facebook Sheffield United Share on WhatsApp This article is more than 11 years old Share on Pinterestlast_img read more


Four Texas Firms Advise on Complex Sanchez Midstream Asset Deal


first_imgTexas-based lawyers from Sidley Austin, Andrews Kurth, Latham & Watkins and Akin Gump were all involved in this transaction, which included both a divestiture of assets and a PIPE offering . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Password Remember me Usernamecenter_img Lost your password? Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img


Akin Gump and VE Work on 243B Reeves Pecos Counties Assets Deal


first_imgBoone Pickens isn’t the only person to recently grace the tiny town of Pecos with his presence in search of some oil. Midland-based Diamondback Energy said Wednesday that it is purchasing $2.43 billion worth of assets in West Texas’ Reeves and Pecos counties from Brigham Resources Operating and Brigham Resources Midstream . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Remember me Password Usernamecenter_img Lost your password? Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img


Guarantee drug companies a profit to develop new antibiotics UK report says


first_img Email Ever-evolving bacteria have left doctors desperate for new drugs, and a new report commissioned by the government of the United Kingdom lays out a plan for how to get them: Global governments should unite to offer multibillion-dollar incentives for drug developers, and pharmaceutical companies should pool their billions in support of early-stage research. The analysis—the third in a series from a commission established by U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron and chaired by former Goldman Sachs economist Jim O’Neill—is the most specific and prescriptive yet, laying out what it calls “a bold set of interventions” to get new drugs to market.The problem of antimicrobial resistance has received a global spotlight lately as cases of highly resistant infections mount. The White House rolled out a new antibiotic resistance budget initiative in January, following the creation of an interagency task force last year.Unfortunately, the development of new drugs has stalled, partially for economic reasons: New therapies are costly and risky to develop, but when they reach the market, they compete with cheap generic drugs that doctors prefer to use for all but the more dire resistant infections. The new report starts with the premise that the world needs 15 new antibiotics per decade, at least four of which should have new mechanisms of action to target the most harmful pathogens, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Click to view the privacy policy. 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Country As a “pump-priming” measure, the report suggests a $2 billion “global innovation fund,” bankrolled by pharmaceutical companies, to conduct fundamental research on bacterial resistance, improve diagnostics to identify resistant strains, and revisit old antibiotics the development of which has stalled.To incentivize drug development without encouraging overuse, the report promotes an idea gaining popularity in antibiotics: “de-linking” a drugmaker’s profits from the drug’s sales. Such strategies aim to give companies assurance that they will make money if they bring valuable new antibiotics to market, regardless of the number of pills prescribed right away. The report suggests two strategies: A “designated global body” could buy the rights to a drug from a pharmaceutical company—for a suggested $2 billion to $3 billion per antibiotic—and carefully control its supply. Or, a company would retain the rights to sell its drug, but receive an additional lump sum reward—a suggested $1 billion to $1.3 billion—for introducing it.“This is a happy moment,” wrote Boston University health law professor Kevin Outterson in a blog post in response to the report. Outterson, who has long promoted de-linkage, says its publication “marks a watershed event as an authoritative endorsement of the principle.”Meanwhile, a public-private partnership between the European Union and the European pharmaceutical industry is already exploring how to implement de-linkage strategies through a project called “driving reinvestment in research and development and responsible antibiotic use” (DRIVE-AB), which held its first meeting in October.last_img read more


Mouse egg cells made entirely in the lab give rise to healthy


first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country O. Hikabe et. al., Nature 538, 7625 (20 October 2016) © MacMillian Publisher Ltd. The new work, reported online in Nature today, builds on more than a decade of research in which Hayashi and his colleague Mitinori Saitou developed ways to derive egg and sperm cells—also called germ cells—from pluripotent stem cells. (Pluripotent stem cells resemble cells in early embryos and can in theory become any tissue in the body.) In 2012 they made fertile egg cells from both mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, derived from early mouse embryos, and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which are reprogrammed adult cells that have taken on the characteristics of ES cells. But to accomplish the final steps of egg development, the researchers had to implant those stem cells into a living mouse. Then, this summer, the scientists showed that they could keep developing mouse ovaries growing in the lab and make them produce mature, fertile eggs. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe In work that raises the prospect of new infertility treatments and designer babies, researchers have used stem cells to grow fertile mouse egg cells for the first time entirely in a lab dish. The eggs gave rise to pups after being fertilized and implanted into rodent foster mothers. The method—which sometimes produced defective eggs and had a success rate of less than 1%—won’t be producing human egg cells any time soon, but the technique could help researchers identify key genes involved in egg development and maturation.The work is a “stunning achievement,” says George Daley of Harvard Medical School in Boston, who was not involved in the project.Egg cells are uniquely powerful, containing the instructions needed to start the development of a new organism. Deriving such cells in the lab has long been a goal for researchers who want study their development in more detail. It also raises a futuristic possibility: being able to make human eggs in the lab from skin or other donor cells—and even being able to make genetically altered egg cells. However, any application to human cells is a very long way off, says Katsuhiko Hayashi, a stem cell biologist at Kyoto University in Japan, who led the new mouse egg studies. The work published today combines the insights gained from that study with the earlier techniques for turning ES and iPS cells into egg precursor cells. First, the scientists used ES and iPS cells to make immature egg precursor cells. Then they inserted those precursors into clusters of cells taken from fetal mouse ovaries. They carefully cultured those cell clusters for more than a month.The team’s lab-based ovaries produced more than 50 mature egg cells each, the scientists report. The labmade eggs had higher rates of chromosome abnormalities than is usually observed in eggs in normal mouse ovaries, but more than 75% had the correct number of chromosomes. The scientists mixed some of those eggs with mouse sperm, producing more than 300 two-cell embryos, which researchers then implanted into foster mothers. However, only 11 of those embryos—or 3%—grew into full-term pups, compared with 62% for eggs taken from adult mice and fertilized in vitro. The reasons for that are still unclear, Hayashi says. The pups that did survive grew into apparently healthy, fertile adults.The researchers also showed that they could derive new ES cell lines from embryos generated from the labmade eggs. That recreates, they note, a full cycle of female germ cell development in the lab.If scientists could use a similar technique to transform human ES or iPS cells into fertile egg cells, it could offer new options for infertile woman, such as those who have gone through egg-destroying chemotherapy. It would also open a whole new range of ethical questions. If researchers could derive egg cells from skin cells or even from a genetically modified line of ES cells, for example, then it would potentially be a way to make a designer baby, with specific genetic alterations. “If a similar strategy proves successful in human pluripotent stem cells, then the options for reproductive biology, but also genetic modification of the germ line, are profound,” Daley says.But that is a long way off, Hayashi says. He and his colleagues are working to apply the new technique to primate cells, but he says the work is far too preliminary for any clinical applications. “We cannot exclude a risk of having a baby with a serious disease,” he says.Some researchers caution that any attempts to recreate a process as intricate as egg development are sure to leave out important factors that aren’t yet understood. The cells have gone through so many lab-based manipulations, each of which introduces possible abnormalities, that it will be difficult to sort out what factors are playing a decisive role, says Allan Spradling, who studies oocyte development at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Baltimore, Maryland. Eggs with a range of severe abnormalities can still give rise to offspring, he notes. “Studying in vitro development may reveal in greater detail how a particular protocol differs from normal,” he says, “but it is much harder to see how such studies could reveal new insight into normal [egg development].” Mice derived from labmade eggs were normal, fertile adults.last_img read more


Was cancer scientist fired for challenging lab chief over authorship


first_img Email Was cancer scientist fired for challenging lab chief over authorship? Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Rutgers University last month terminated a veteran cancer scientist in retaliation, the researcher says, for challenging a powerful principal investigator on the authorship of a paper apparently accepted for publication in Nature. The researcher is now deciding whether to appeal her dismissal in arbitration through her union or to sue Rutgers.Xiaoqi Xie, 54, was fired on 28 September from a research job in the lab of Eileen White, deputy director and chief scientific officer at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick. Xie, who had conducted research at the institute since 2007 and has worked in White’s lab since 2011, was cited in her termination letter for failing to do her job “effectively,” for “conduct unbecoming” a faculty member, and for “serious violation” of university policies, namely her alleged failure on five occasions between May and early July to promptly euthanize more than 20 sick mice being used to study melanoma—charges she disputes. In the letter, Rutgers also accuses her of missing three meetings with her bosses.The firing comes 6 months after Xie first challenged White’s decision to give another lab scientist sole first authorship on a paper, submitted in April to Nature and not yet published. That manuscript reveals a novel mechanism by which tumor growth is stunted when host animals are incapable of autophagy—the cell’s degrading and recycling of unneeded or damaged components. White is a leading authority on autophagy and has earned many scientific honors, including selection as an AAAS fellow. (AAAS is the publisher of ScienceInsider.) By Meredith WadmanOct. 9, 2018 , 12:55 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Xiaoqi Xie says she was fired from the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey because she asked to share first authorship on a paper submitted to Nature. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Several of Xie’s colleagues, who did not want to be identified, describe her as a quiet, conscientious scientist who regularly worked late and was helpful to colleagues. “I don’t see her as someone who would speak up to dispute authorship unless it’s something pretty egregious,” said one. Colleagues and the union that represents cancer institute faculty in employment disputes also say the animal care lapses Xie is charged with normally would not be firing offenses.Rutgers, through a university spokesperson, declined to answer questions about Xie’s termination or related matters and refused to make White available for an interview. But the school issued this statement: “We do not comment on specific personnel matters. Rutgers University has comprehensive policies and procedures to ensure that fair employment processes are followed.” Xie’s dismissal comes against a backdrop of increased scrutiny of the power structure in science. It also shines a light on the perennially fraught issue of how credit for authorship is designated in a hugely competitive environment in which prominent placement as an author propels young careers and sustains established ones. “The firing aside, the reason that these issues are so fraught is that careers, particularly early ones, can be made or broken by these sorts of authorship decisions,” says Steven Goodman, a clinical epidemiologist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who studies how the publication process incentivizes and rewards scientists. “Authorship is a very crude instrument, a poor surrogate for the value of contributions,” he adds. “But it’s widely relied on. And that’s what raises the stakes.”A long-term relationship unravelsThe Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey is considered the crown jewel of the medical school and bioscience entities that are part of The State University of New Jersey. White was recruited in 2005 as the institute’s associate director for basic science and has risen to become its second in command.Before coming to the United States, Xie earned an M.D. at Zunyi Medical University in China, and a Ph.D. in cell and molecular biology at Umeå University in Sweden. She began as a postdoc in the cancer institute lab of Joseph Bertino, working there from 2007 until she joined White’s lab in 2011. She was promoted in 2016 to instructor—a short-term faculty position below assistant professor that doesn’t necessarily involve teaching. Rutgers guidelines stipulate that instructors who are not promoted to assistant professor within 3 years ultimately lose their jobs.Beginning in 2013, Xie says, she set up hundreds of cages of mice engineered to lack autophagy. She inoculated the mice with melanoma cells and by late 2015, she says, she had powerful evidence that tumors grew more slowly in the autophagy-deficient mice. Xie combed the literature to try to find the biochemical explanation and, in a 31 May 2016 lab meeting, she proposed a research direction that, she says, no one else in the lab had offered. She also suggested new experiments to test it. (Xie provided Science with a Powerpoint version of her lab presentation.)At that meeting, says Xie, White insisted that she surrender the project to a postdoc who had arrived in the lab a few months earlier. That person conducted mouse experiments seemingly identical to those Xie had already conducted, although the grant supporting the postdoc specified that the person study lung cancer in a different mouse model, according to an abstract of the grant obtained by Science. The postdoc and colleagues then executed experiments including those that Xie had proposed in her presentation, she says, leading to the biochemical findings that are the centerpiece of the paper at Nature. The postdoc is now first author on the paper, which White has said is accepted, according to Xie. (In a statement, a Nature Research spokesperson said, “We are unable to comment on papers that may or may not be under consideration for publication in Nature.”)Xie first challenged White on authorship of the paper in an email on 26 March. Xie had been sent a draft of the paper in which the contributions section stated simply that she “assisted with tumor growth experiments.” She was listed as second author, after the postdoc. (That postdoc did not respond to repeated emails requesting an interview.) Xie argued in the email that she should share first authorship with the postdoc. Her email to White described “3 years of [my] very hard work,” her results, and her May 2016 Powerpoint proposing the research direction. Xie’s email stated: “I strongly protest this kind of unfair treatment, and I strongly believe that my discovery and contribution deserves more than the second authorship.”At a 8 May authorship meeting with White, Xie’s union representative, and Janice Mehnert, a cancer institute physician who was Xie’s direct supervisor, Xie repeated the arguments. On 15 August, 1 week after receiving notice that the university was instituting proceedings to terminate her, Xie notified Nature that she had not been given a chance to review and consent to the paper as it was submitted and that she had a complaint about the crediting of authors in the manuscript. In the statement to Science, a Nature Research spokesperson said: “Nature Research journal editors are not in a position to investigate or adjudicate authorship disputes before or after publication.”After Xie contacted Nature, White apparently crafted a written review of the authorship designation on the paper, which Science has obtained. It notes that in December 2015, Xie signed a letter promoting her to “instructor” and committing to 100% effort and salary on a grant not involving the autophagy work, under Mehnert. “Due to 100% effort on that grant,” the review states, “Xie was not involved in numerous meetings and discussions related to this project outside of lab meetings.” The authorship review adds that Xie “seems unaware that [the autophagy hypothesis] is the main topic of the [postdoc’s] fellowship” and “does not merit first authorship as the bulk of the work is being done by [the postdoc.]” It says Xie “was the only author that did not provide comments on the manuscript other than complaining about the description of her contribution to the work.”The review further argues that Xie was not involved at all with a paper published in August 2014 by others in White’s lab, pointing to autophagy in normal host cells as playing a role in tumor growth. White’s review also states that in early 2015, well before Xie’s November findings in the mice inoculated with melanoma, another lab colleague, working at White’s direction, had shown that lung tumors grow poorly in mice engineered to lack autophagy. Xie counters that those earlier results scarcely reached statistical significance, and says that is why, 1 year later, White asked the new postdoc to recreate Xie’s much more dramatic results in autophagy-incapable mice inoculated with melanoma.Mistreated mice?Xie challenges many of Rutgers’s stated reasons for firing her, both the alleged animal care violations and the missed meetings. The American Association of University Professors Biomedical and Health Sciences of New Jersey in Newark, the cancer institute faculty union, also disputes the stated grounds. In a 21 September letter to senior Rutgers officials, the union wrote that the firing is retaliation for the authorship dispute and is “an orchestrated effort to force Dr. Xie out.” The letter added: “Dr. Xie’s past evaluations will show that following [animal care] protocols has never before been an issue. … It is simply not credible that a researcher who has served the institution admirably for eleven years would suddenly deviate from animal protocols without explanation.”The union communication noted that mice with melanoma are expected to get sick, and that many researchers besides Xie regularly receive the animal health concern “cards” that Rutgers has used of evidence of Xie’s purported negligence. Roger Johansen, the union’s president, added in an interview that, even if Xie failed to promptly put down mice as Rutgers alleges, “Usually for [animal care] violations, you retrain the person. You don’t fire them. Here they go from zero to 60 just like that.”A Rutgers official wrote in Xie’s 28 September termination letter that her lack of prior animal violations was “irrelevant” to the matter at hand. “You failed to euthanize the animals in a timely manner despite receiving directives to do so, and you failed to correct your practice … even after being told that you must adhere to the approved protocol.” The official, Lisa Bonick, executive director of Rutgers’s Office of Academic Labor Relations, added that the mice at issue had tumors larger than allowed under the experimental protocol, ulcerated tumors, or both. Bonick also wrote: “You were repeatedly told that you were not adhering to approval protocol via the issued animal health concern notices; emails from … veterinary staff, Dr. Mehnert and Dr. White; conversations with Dr. Mehnert, Dr. White and … veterinary staff; and meetings.”Xie says she was never interviewed or notified by veterinary staff or the university’s Animal Care and Use Committee that she had violated rules—receiving an animal health concern card is not listed as a violation but as a statement of needed action on Rutgers’s website—until after she received a letter on 7 August notifying her of the university’s intention to terminate her.Xie adds that emails between her and veterinary staff, to which she no longer has access, could make clear that she responded promptly to five animal health concern cards dated 8 May, 9 May, 4 June, 29 June, and 5 July; often, after receiving such a card, she emailed veterinary staff to note that she had euthanized an animal on their request, although such emails are not required. Rutgers refused requests from the union to make Xie’s emails available.The final daysIn Rutgers’s final termination letter to Xie on 28 September, Bonick dismissed the claim of retaliation, writing, “Dr. Mehnert and Dr. White made it very clear [during an 18 September hearing on the proposed termination] that it was important to them that you feel [sic] as though you were a valued member of the lab, and they therefore took your concerns seriously and looked into them very carefully. ” The letter says White enlisted two senior faculty members not involved with the upcoming paper to blindly review it. “Both individuals agreed with the authorship,” Bonick states.Rutgers also wrote that Xie had become “insubordinate” this spring and summer, failing to attend three meetings with White or Mehnert. Xie acknowledges missing one meeting, on 15 June—a meeting that Xie herself had requested, to amend an animal care protocol to allow open wounds on sick mice to be treated with antibiotics—forgetting about it while she was on the phone with her elderly mother, who was recently widowed in China. (At the time, she did not tell White or Mehnert why she forgot the meeting.)Xie says she sought out White with pictures and videos of sick mice for a second meeting, on 9 July, to discuss the care of the animals, but there was no specified time for the meeting. When she failed to find White in her lab, she decided to present the photos and videos at the next day’s lab meeting. Xie says she doesn’t recall being notified of a 19 July meeting with White and Mehnert to discuss her poor performance review, which was issued on 17 July. Bonick wrote in the termination letter that Xie “ignored” the 9 July meeting and “refused” to attend the 19 July meeting. Xie lost access to her Rutgers email, computer, and other documents on 7 August, and she was escorted out of the building.One of Xie’s colleagues is skeptical that the animal care violations were the real reason for her dismissal. “Having a sick card is really a minor thing. Even if you were to not follow up in a timely manner I don’t think it’s grounds for termination.”last_img read more


Space laser will map Earths forests in 3D spotting habitat for atrisk


first_img Space laser will map Earth’s forests in 3D, spotting habitat for at-risk species Countries that want to use the carbon stored in their forests to help meet Paris agreement climate targets may use those maps to gauge progress, says Naikoa Aguilar-Amuchastegui, director of forest carbon science at the World Wildlife Fund in Washington, D.C. Researchers tracking forest degradation, due to the selective logging of individual trees and fuelwood harvesting from the understory, are eager for the data, too. Those activities are invisible to imaging satellites such as Landsat, says Laura Duncanson, a research scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “GEDI gets you that third dimension,” she says.The 3D maps could also identify the rich structure and variety of forests that harbor at-risk species such as the orangutan, says Scott Goetz, an ecologist at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff and a mission deputy principal investigator. The maps could find priority areas for conservation, and even help plan habitat corridors for wildlife migrating because of climate change.The finely tuned laser will also resolve the heights of treetops and the ground more precisely than previous instruments—crucial for monitoring the health of the carbon-dense mangrove forests that shroud tropical coastlines, says Goddard research scientist Lola Fatoyinbo Agueh. Knowing how high the mangroves sit above the water could determine whether they will keep pace with sea level rise or die back, releasing stored carbon—a key input for climate models, she says.GEDI’s perch on the space station—chosen to keep its cost below a $94 million cap—comes with a drawback, however. Its view will be confined to latitudes between 51.6° north and south. That means it will miss the boreal forests of North America and Asia. And it will likely get booted after 2 years to make room for a Japanese instrument. The short mission will make it harder to answer an urgent question: Are tropical forests overall a carbon sink, capturing some of the emissions from vehicles and industry, or a source? That depends on whether forest growth is sequestering more carbon than deforestation and degradation are releasing. But seeing such a trend requires years of continuous data, says Wayne Walker of the Woods Hole Research Center in Falmouth, Massachusetts. “Nothing’s better than a long-term record.”GEDI also can’t distinguish tree species, which vary in carbon density. Dubayah is using species-specific measurements from about 5000 field plots to calibrate the GEDI data. But with more than 40,000 tree species in the tropics, that’s just a start, says Oliver Phillips, an ecologist at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom, who runs a large tropical forest plot network. “A large ground effort is needed to get maximum value from this,” Phillips says.Researchers may be able to work around some of these limitations. Alessandro Baccini, a remote sensing scientist also at Woods Hole, hopes to train machine-learning algorithms to extend carbon estimates into the past and future by using GEDI’s carbon maps to calibrate long-term forest-cover data from imaging satellites. He adds that by combining data from GEDI and ICESat-2, a NASA lidar satellite launched in September that primarily measures ice sheets but is flying over the whole planet, investigators could construct a global carbon map—one that includes the boreal forest. Still, Baccini wants more. “Why can’t we have a proper mission designed for vegetation that is global?” he asks. BRUSINI Aurélien/hemis.fr/Hemis/Alamy Stock Photo The GEDI laser will penetrate tropical forest treetops to map the understory’s 3D structure. Tallying up the biomass in a forest—and monitoring changes to it—is no easy task. You can cordon off a patch of forest and use tape measures to assess tree growth, hoping your patch is representative of the wider forest. Or you can turn to aerial or satellite photography—if the pictures are available and sharp enough. But even the best cameras can’t see past the forest canopy to the understory below.On 5 December, scientists gained a new tool for this tricky business when NASA’s Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) was launched on a SpaceX rocket. The instrument, the size of a large refrigerator, will be attached to the International Space Station, where it will begin to gather data on the height and 3D structure of tropical and temperate forests. The campaign will help scientists understand whether forests are slowing or amplifying climate change, and identify prime habitat for valued species. “We’ve wanted this data set desperately,” says Ralph Dubayah, a geographer at the University of Maryland in College Park and the project’s principal investigator.GEDI will harness a technology called light detection and ranging (lidar). Like its cousin radar, lidar sends out pulses of electromagnetic energy and measures the reflections. But whereas radar uses radio waves, GEDI’s lidar uses laser light, firing 242 times per second in the near-infrared. The focused, high-frequency radiation offers sharp resolution and can penetrate dense forests, bouncing not only off the treetops, but also off midstory leaves, branches, and the ground. Dubayah and his colleagues will combine GEDI data with ground measurements and statistical models to produce maps of tropical forest carbon that, at 1 kilometer resolution, should vastly shrink the errors of previous maps. Emailcenter_img By Gabriel PopkinDec. 5, 2018 , 1:20 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more


Students Host Hospital Prom For Friend With Cancer


first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail Black Twitter Is Split On Reparations After Contentious House Hearing The 19-year-old was diagnosed with a bone cancer called osteosarcoma. This rare disease typically impacts the arm and leg bones. Prior to his diagnosis, Barron played on the varsity football team. Two years ago, he began experiencing severe pain in his legs. Initially many people thought the pain was a result of playing sports, but after several tests doctors discovered a tumor in one of his legs. He was diagnosed in February and has been in and out of the hospital ever since. Barron was planning on going to his senior ball but ended up in the hospital two days before the event.With the help of his mother Nelisha, his friends were able to organize a prom celebration for Barron at Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. They all dressed up in gowns and suits and transformed the 11th floor of the hospital into the perfect backdrop for a prom celebration. The group listened to music and ate food from Dinosaur Bar-B-Que. Barron was moved to tears by the effort made by his friends to make sure that he would be able to experience prom. “I loved it,” he told the news outlet. “It was the most special moment ever. Having everybody there, all my friends. And it was my first high school dance.”Barron is not letting cancer get in the way of what he wants to accomplish. He still supports his school’s football team and has continued to excel academically. “I never sat down and said, ‘Why me?’” he said in a statement, after being named a Young and Amazing award recipient. “There’s no point in that, because it was only going to hurt me in the long run. Staying mentally positive about it came easier.” Cancer , High School , Ilijah Barron , Prom House Judiciary Committee Holds Hearing On American Slavery Reparations center_img SEE ALSO:Black Teacher Gives Students Haircuts For GraduationBlack-Owned Barbershop Pays Off Debt For Students In Charlotte Liverpool senior ball comes to hospital for student battling cancer (video, photos) https://t.co/nxBjn7dsJv— syracuse.com (@syracusedotcom) June 22, 2019 When a group of high school seniors from New York learned that their classmate Ilijah Barron would be missing prom due to his ongoing battle with bone cancer, they were determined to make sure that he could experience the special day. Since Barron was unable to attend prom, the Liverpool High School students joined forces and organized a celebration for him at the hospital, Syracuse.com reported.last_img read more


Obamas Brother Announces His 2020 Endorsement


first_img Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. The Blackest Reactions To The First Democratic Debate SUBSCRIBE But one family member who hasn’t been heard from in a while is the first Black president’s older half-brother, Malik Obama, who has been on his grind lately making sure people remember his name in this election cycle, for better or for worse. And after making himself available to right-wing sympathizing media in recent months, that grind has seemingly culminated in a single tweet that left nothing up to chance when it came to his political affiliations and who the 61-year-old naturalized U.S. citizen would like to see in the White House next year.Malik Obama tweeted a photo of a $20 bill on Wednesday with the word “Trump” written on the back of a $20 bill and between two arrows that each pointed the 20 on the bottom corners. The only text that accompanied the tweet was the number, “2020.”   US-VOTE-DEBATESource: ROBYN BECK / GettyWhen it comes to the family of former President Barack Obama, there are seemingly no secrets to be kept. Everyone knows about Michelle, Malia and Sasha being the model of grace and class. We know about Michelle’s mom, who the former first lady credited with teaching her how to be an effective parent. We know Malia is in college and has a boyfriend. We know Sasha is all grown up now, too. SEE ALSO:Black Man Who Wore MAGA Hat And Nearly Killed A Mexican Man Is ConvictedFamily Of Black Man Killed By South Bend Cops Sue As Mayor Pete Takes Debate Stage Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. 2020 pic.twitter.com/STqC0JrXUj— Malik Obama (@ObamaMalik) June 26, 2019Setting aside the fact that Malik Obama seemingly broke the law by defacing American currency, the point was clear: He is firmly back on the Trump Train that he so proudly rode during the 2016 election.The tweet may have also been a swipe at his half-brother, whose Treasury Department announced in his final months in office in 2016 that Harriet Tubman would replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill. With Trump consequently announced the following year that change would not be happening on his watch — and recently doubling down on that — Malik Obama’s tweet could be construed as yet another way to snub his nose at his younger sibling. To anyone who was not paying attention, Malik Obama and his younger half-brother don’t have the warmest or closest relationship. The fact that Joe Biden, the presumed Democratic nominee, was Barack’s vice president probably didn’t help matters any.“It wasn’t always this way,” the Washington Post wrote weeks before the 2016 election. “Malik Obama was his half brother’s best man when Barack Obama married Michelle. Barack Obama performed the same role at one of Malik’s weddings.”The two fell out somewhere between 2013 and Trump’s candidacy in 2016. That’s when Malik’s pro-Trump rhetoric — allegedly because Barack wouldn’t help him in his endeavors as much as he wanted — began growing louder, going so far as to tell the New York Post that “Make America Great Again is a great slogan.”Trump, in turn, invited Malik Obama to be his guest at the third and final presidential debate against Hillary Clinton in Las Vegas one month before the election.While Malik Obama has made his famous sibling the primary focus of his media rounds, it should be noted that there has not been a single word of slander from the former president against his older half-brother. It would seem that the disdain is only one-sided, even though Malik Obama in April had some not-so-nice words to say about the former first lady, his sister-in-law, in an interview with a media outlet in Utah.It was unclear what kind of political capital Malik Obama’s repeat endorsement of Trump carries. But chances are that the president will use Malik Obama’s tweet to fuel further disparaging remarks about Barack Obama, who Trump has repeatedly spread “birther” lies about much like that time Malik Obama circulated a fake photo that purportedly showed Barack Obama’s Kenyan birth certificate. Democratic Presidential Candidates Participate In First Debate Of 2020 Election Over Two Nights 2020 Election , Barack Obama , Malik Obamalast_img read more


Japan quits global whaling body will resume commercial hunt


first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Read more… By Nathanial Gronewold, E&E NewsDec. 26, 2018 , 2:05 PM Japan quits global whaling body, will resume commercial hunt For years, Japan has said its continued whaling was for scientific research only. The IWC is among the world’s oldest international institutions, formed a few short years after the founding of the United Nations in 1945. Japan joined the London-based organization in 1951.The government says it will leave as a formal member by July 2019 but will remain an observer to the global body. While today’s announcement makes it official, Japanese media reported on the move last week (Greenwire, 20 December).In a Japanese language announcement posted by the office of the prime minister’s cabinet secretary, Yoshihide Suga, the government says its decision was made based on sound scientific reasoning and in the interest of “sustainable use of marine resources.””By withdrawing, our nation’s thinking in terms of cooperation with international marine resources management does not change,” Suga said. “We will participate in the IWC as an observer, and while maintaining ties to international organizations our nation will keep contributing to whale resources management based on scientific principles.”The decision comes after Japan threatened to leave the IWC earlier this year. Tokyo has made similar threats before, but the Japanese delegation to the IWC hinted at the forthcoming withdrawal in the strongest language yet at the closing in September of the IWC’s formal meeting in Brazil (Greenwire, 14 September).The governments of New Zealand and Australia expressed relief that the Southern Ocean whaling campaign would end but urged Japan to continue on as a full IWC member.Conservation groups reacted angrily to Tokyo’s decision. Japan’s departure will deal a stiff financial blow to the IWC as that nation is the second largest contributor to the international whaling regulator, after the United States.”This snub to multilateralism is unacceptable and deeply concerning,” Greenpeace Australia campaigner Nathaniel Pelle said in a release. “This is a grave mistake and Greenpeace urges Japan to reconsider its decision.”An IWC-Japan divorce is the culmination of a wide ideological divide at the commission between ardent anti-whaling nations and countries seeking recognition of limited commercial whaling activities as legitimate. The anti-whaling forces have the upper hand, even though IWC’s expansion has seen more pro-whaling countries joining in recent years.At the Brazil gathering, Japan had attempted to nudge the IWC toward reforms that would have potentially paved the way for a resumption of commercial whaling. The IWC was initially established to regulate whaling but has enforced an outright moratorium on commercial whaling operations since the 1980s in a desperate bid to prevent the extinction of several whale species. Many whale species have since recovered to a degree, but a few are still considered endangered.Japan’s reform push was easily voted down.Instead, a majority of IWC members voted to have the commission turn its back on commercial whaling for good. That successful resolution also condemned Japan’s scientific whaling practices, widely regarded as a clandestine commercial operation as Japan’s whaling fleet takes hundreds of whales each year, with the meat ending up in grocery stores and restaurants.IWC also approved subsistence whale hunts for Arctic aboriginal communities.The large Japanese delegation at Brazil didn’t hide its frustration. The government accuses IWC members of hypocrisy for allowing culture exemptions from the moratorium for Alaskan and Russian native groups, but not for Japan and Scandinavian whaling cultures.Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2018. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net. Emailcenter_img Originally published by E&E NewsJapan announced its withdrawal today from the International Whaling Commission (IWC), with plans to resume commercial whaling next year.With its withdrawal from the regulatory body, Japan ends its controversial scientific whaling program, which had occurred annually under commission oversight. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Japan’s fleet is currently hunting minke whales, but Tokyo indicated that it would be that nation’s final Antarctic whale hunt. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Jiji Press/Newscom last_img read more


Express daily briefing Rohit Sharmas century leads India to semis How Mumbais


first_img Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 LiveKarnataka floor test: MLAs have made false allegations in SC, says CM Best Of Express Taking stock of monsoon rain Rs 200 for last rites, Rs 25,000 for house: TMC men’s cut money rate listFrom Rs 200 for last rites to Rs 25,000 for house – these are the “fixed rates” charged from people by grassroot TMC leaders to avail benefits of specific central and state run schemes in West Bengal. Ravik Bhattacharya and Santanu Chowdhury speak to residents in  12 villages across Hooghly, Bardhaman and Birbhum, to find a deep sense of anger and despair at the “system” where this practice of “cut money” has become a norm. Riding on Rohit’s fourth century, India in World Cup semifinalsDuring his match-winning knock of 104 against Bangladesh, Rohit Sharma’s six on a lofted straight drive against Mustafizur Rehman was easily the shot of the day. Sriram Veera writes how Sharma’s incredible balance and stillness at the crease allows him to belt those graceful lofts over the head of the bowler.Auto industries visionary leader passes away By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Published: July 3, 2019 9:19:10 am Lee Iacocca, a charismatic US auto industry executive and visionary, who gave America the Ford Mustang and Chrysler minivan, and was celebrated for saving Chrysler from going out of business, died at the age of 94.And finally…In Goa, a video of a cow playing “holding midfielder” went viral Monday morning with United Sports Club in Mardol wondering if she should be felicitated. The cow, holding on to the ball, and playing the state’s favourite sport, won thousands of hearts. Top News During the Union Budget presentation on July 5, the government is expected to announce incentives including tax sops for companies that make capital investments in a time-bound manner and generate jobs in view of pushing private sector investment and job creation in the economy.Indore BJP in a huddle; HC orders razing of building at centre of rowOn the day Prime Minister Narendra Modi disapproved of Akash Vijayvargiya’s conduct, the Indore BJP, which celebrated his release from jail, went into a huddle. The High Court has allowed officials to continue with the demolition process of the building at the centre of the controversy.Editorial: After the hand-pumpMP Sunny Deol seems to have confused his new role with being a movie star. In politics, there are no ‘stand-ins.’ Being an MP carries with it an expectation of accountability, one that demands slightly more than a sunny disposition, dhai kilo ka haath and an enthusiastic line producer to do the actual work. Advertisingcenter_img LiveKarnataka floor test: MLAs have made false allegations in SC, says CM Express daily briefing: Rohit Sharma's century leads India to semis, How Mumbai's response to rains has changed since 2005; and more Top news on Wednesday morning.Mumbai rains 2005 vs 2019: Response to disasters come a long wayHeavy rainfall in Mumbai over the last two days may have triggered memories of the July 26, 2005 deluge. But this time, the Maximum City has responded differently. From clearly drafted standard operation protocol for disaster management, to social media warnings and IMD alerts, Mumbai’s response to disasters has come a long way since 2005. On Budget table: Likely tax breaks for companies that invest, generate jobs Advertising Chandrayaan-2 launch on July 22 at 2.43 pm: ISRO More Explained Chandrayaan-2 launch on July 22 at 2.43 pm: ISRO Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Post Comment(s)last_img read more


Bowel Cancer UK and Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh launch fundraising


first_imgWe are committed to supporting the best surgical research to deliver tangible outcomes for patients. To achieve this we work with others to maximize our impact. Our partnership with Bowel Cancer UK marks an important milestone in our attempts to address a form of cancer that kills over 16,000 people a year in the UK. Committing our resources to this new Research Chair will allow us to address the causes of this terrible condition and bring hope to the thousands diagnosed each year.” Professor Steve Wigmore, College Research Chair at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, says: Find out more about Scotland’s first Colorectal Cancer Surgical Research Chair and the ‘Improving Surgery, Saving Lives’ appeal here: bowelcanceruk.org.ukBowel Cancer UK and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh launched the ‘Improving Surgery, Saving Lives’ appeal on the evening of Wednesday 26 September 2018 at Surgeons’ Quarter, Edinburgh.Source: https://www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk/ Oct 1 2018Bowel Cancer UK, in partnership with the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, launch a £430,000 fundraising appeal for surgical bowel cancer research to establish Scotland’s first Colorectal Cancer Surgical Research Chair.Bowel cancer is Scotland’s second biggest cancer killer. However, it shouldn’t be because it is treatable and curable especially if diagnosed early. Surgery is the most common treatment for bowel cancer and central to curing the disease, yet investment in surgical research is sorely lacking.Investing in surgical research is crucial to develop more effective and personalized life-saving treatments, standardize surgery and care for patients regardless of where they live and minimize side-effects for everyone who has an operation.Bowel Cancer UK and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh will establish Scotland’s first Colorectal Cancer Surgical Research Chair in partnership with a Scottish university to drive forward the surgical clinical trial agenda for bowel cancer, growing the number of surgical trials focussed on bowel cancer and increasing patient access to them.The partnership will support the position for four years, after which time it will be funded by the hosting university. The Chair will lead, support and help drive forward: Deborah Alsina MBE, Chief Executive of Bowel Cancer UK, says: We’re thrilled to be working in partnership with the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh to launch our ‘Improving Surgery, Saving Lives’ appeal to fund the first Colorectal Cancer Surgical Research Chair in Scotland.Clinical trials are vital for taking potential treatment developments from research ideas to translating them into new drugs, diagnostic tests and surgical treatments for patients. Over the years, surgical clinical trials have had a huge impact on improving the outcomes for people with bowel cancer.  Most recently, we have seen great advances in using drugs and surgery in combination to help shrink the tumours to a size that makes surgery more likely to be effective at curing patients. Only surgical clinical trials offer us the evidence to know this is safe and effective.” New and innovative surgical treatments for bowel cancer patients that are more effective and personalized Partnerships to increase the number of surgical clinical trials for bowel cancer patients in Scotland Strategies to recruit more patients into existing surgical clinical trialslast_img read more