Baltic Exchange Launches New Ship Operating Expenses Assessment

first_img“The Baltic Operating Expense Index is intended to providetransparency to the fluctuations in running costs. Daily operating costs areone of the variables used by shipping investors to calculate the profitabilityand residual value of their assets. We already provide independent freight,sale & purchase and recycling assessments. With the addition of operationalexpenses assessments, shipping investors now have a complete toolkit to managetheir risk and aide their decision process.” Sea News, September 12 The Baltic Exchange has launched a new assessment to trackthe cost of operating vessels. Initially covering a range of dry bulk vessels,the service will also be expanded to tankers and other sectors. Baltic Exchange ChiefExecutive Mark Jackson said: Each panel member will submit four numbers, expressed in USDper day. Three will be combined to produce the BOI: Handysize:38,200mt dwt at draft 10.538m SSW, built in “first class competitive yard”,47,125cbm grain, LOA 180m, beam 29.8m, 5 holds, 5 hatches, 4 x 30mt cranes. Notice classed, not scrubber fitted, 5 years old & special survey passed. The assessments will be available on www.balticexchange.comto subscribers to Baltic Exchange market information services. Supramax: 58,328mt dwt on 12.80m draft SSW built in “first class competitive yard”. LOA189.99m, Beam 32.26m, 72,360 cbm grain, 5 holds/hatches, 4 x 30mt cranes with 4x 12cbm grabs. Not ice classed, not scrubber fitted, 5 years old & specialsurvey passed. The Baltic Operating Expense Index (BOI) will be publishedquarterly and based on assessments from three leading independent third-partyship management companies: Anglo-Eastern, Columbia Shipmanagement and FleetManagement. Collectively they manage a fleet of over 1,800 vessels. Additionalcompanies are expected to join the panel in the future and a residual pricecalculation added later this year.center_img The vessels initially assessed are: The fourth, an assessment of a five year Drydock cost, willbe amortised over five years to give a USD/day price, but published separatelyand will not contribute to BOI. Panamax: 82,500mt dwt built in “first class competitive yard”, 97,000cbm grain, LOA 229m,draft 14.43m. Not ice classed, not scrubber fitted, 5 years old & specialsurvey passed. Assessments will be provided quarterly. Q4 2018 and Q1 andQ2 2019 assessments are available following a recent trial. Q3 2019 assessmentswill be published on 17 October. Crew (USD per day, including all fees)Technical ((USD per day, including all fees)Insurance (USD per day, including all fees andrebates) Capesize: 180,000mt dwt built in “first class competitive yard”, 199,000cbm grain, LOA 290m,beam 45m, draft 18.2m SSW. Not ice classed, not scrubber fitted, 5 years old& special survey passed. Author: Baibhav Mishralast_img read more

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Sale of 8 Port Terminals: CMA CGM completes First Transaction

first_imgWith this transaction, CMA CGM is proceeding with thedelivery of its USD 2.1 billion liquidity plan announced on 25 th November2019. This plan among others reduces CMA CGM consolidated debt by more than USD1.3 billion by the end of first-half 2020 and allows to extend certainfinancing facilities maturing during the year. This initial disposalincludes the following terminals: Sea News, March 27 The CMA CGM Groupreduces its debt and is proceeding with its liquidity plan The CMA CGM Group reduces its debt andimmediately increases its liquidityCMA CGM delivers on its USD 2.1 billionliquidity plan announced on 25th November 2019The CMA CGM Group strengthens its balance sheetamidst the high uncertainty created by the global Covid-19 health crisis “This transaction, announced on the 20th of December 2019,is an important step in its 2.1 billion USD liquidity plan and will allow us tostrengthen our balance sheet. Amid the high uncertainty created by the COVID-19health crisis, the closing of this transaction as previously announceddemonstrates the resilience of the CMA CGM Group.” In line with the terms and conditions of the agreementannounced on 20th December 2019 this first transaction represents a totalall-cash consideration of USD 815 million. It will enable Terminal Link toexpand its geographic footprint and global network, thereby enhancing itsbusiness development prospects. The sale of the last two terminals covered by the agreementbetween CMA CGM and CMP should be completed by the end of first-half 2020 foran all-cash consideration over USD 150 million, pending approval by thecompetent regulatory agencies. The CMA CGM Group, a world leader in shipping and logistics,announces today the first closing of its agreement with China Merchants Port(CMP), with the sale of its stakes in eight port terminals to Terminal Link.Terminal Link joint venture was created in 2013 and is 51% owned by CMA CGM and49% by CMP.center_img (Image Courtesy: CMA CGM) The Group strengthensits balance sheet in the midst of the global health crisis Rodolphe Saadé,Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the CMA CGM Group, stated: The CMA CGM Group strengthens its balance sheet amidst thehigh uncertainty created by the global Covid-19 health crisis. While the crisishas had a limited impact in the first quarter of 2020, the Group expects adecline in volumes, particularly outbound to Europe and the United States. Author: Baibhav Mishra Odessa Terminal (Ukraine)CMA CGM PSA Lion Terminal (CPLT), SingaporeKingston Freeport Terminal (Jamaica)Rotterdam World Gateway (Netherlands)Qingdao Qianwan United Advance ContainerTerminal (China)Vietnam International Container Terminal, Ho ChiMinh City (Vietnam)Laem Chabang International Terminal (Thailand)Umm Qasr Terminal (Iraq) CMA CGM completes a first transaction relating to the sale of eight port terminals to Terminal Link for USD 815 million in cashlast_img read more

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U.S. targets agriculture pollution in Saginaw Bay

first_imgU.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow says farmers interested in participating in a federal program to reduce pollution in Saginaw Bay have until July 22 to enroll.The Michigan Democrat said Tuesday that Saginaw Bay is one of three watersheds in the U.S. included in the preservation and conservation effort. It’s part of President Barack Obama’s America’s Great Outdoors initiative and has $550,000 in funding.advertisementadvertisement Stabenow chairs the Senate Agriculture Committee. Her office says the effort “will improve the bay’s water and habitat conditions by helping agricultural landowners and producers to implement critical conservation practices that prevent nutrients and sediment from reaching the bay’s waters.”The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is overseeing the effort. It held a public meeting in Bay City last month on the program. PD—AP newswire reportlast_img read more

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U.S. farm exports boom as rest of economy struggles

first_imgAs U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack visits Vietnam and China to talk trade, he’s hoping to build on one of the few bright spots in the struggling American economy: agricultural exports.U.S. agricultural exports are projected to reach a record $137 billion this year and hit that same mark next year. The U.S. agricultural trade surplus is expected to top $42 billion. And new free trade agreements with South Korea, Colombia and Panama are expected to boost farm exports by another $2.3 billion, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.advertisementadvertisement The gains aren’t limited to products like corn, soybeans, rice, beef and pork. U.S. exports of dairy products, including powdered milk, cheese and butter, and nuts such as pecans, pistachios and almonds also have climbed in recent years.In an interview with The Associated Press, Vilsack rattled off several reasons why agricultural exports are doing so well when much of the economy is stagnant: demand in China and other developing nations, the growing productivity of American farmers and ranchers, a positive perception of American agricultural products overseas and aggressive marketing efforts by farm groups and the USDA.”As long as we continue to focus on those countries with these emerging middle classes, and focus on countries that are open to trade agreements, that open their markets as much as our markets are open, we’re always going to do well,” Vilsack said.He pointed to the new trade deal with South Korea, which he expects will boost U.S. farm exports by about $1.9 billion annually. It also may reopen the door for discussions with China and Japan about reducing their restrictions on American beef imports, he said.Exports in general have been a bright spot in the struggling U.S. economy, which is why the Obama administration has set a goal of doubling them in five years. Agriculture makes up about 9 percent of U.S. exports, compared with about 80 percent for manufacturing. But Commerce Department data show farm exports grew much faster than manufacturing exports during the past decade – by 123 percent compared to 68 percent.High prices for farm products explains much of the increase in value for agriculture exports – the same products shipped overseas are worth much more today than they were 10 years ago. But the USDA also has done a “great job” of promoting agricultural exports, said Frank Vargo, vice president for international economic affairs at the National Association of Manufacturers.advertisementVargo, who spent three decades in trade policy positions at the Commerce Department, said he was always “admiring and jealous” of the USDA’s export programs. The agency spends about double what the Commerce Department spends on export promotion, which is a big reason why one-third of U.S. farm products get shipped overseas, compared with only one-fifth of manufactured goods, he said.”Our ag exports are a strong point for the United States and we’d like them to stay that way,” Vargo said, “but we’d like manufacturing, even though manufacturing exports are 80 percent of our exports, we want steps taken to make them grow faster.”Vilsack will be the first agriculture secretary to visit Vietnam, which has jumped from the No. 50 to the No. 15 market for U.S. farm exports in the past decade. He said he hopes the Vietnamese see his visit as a sign of the importance the U.S. places on their relationship.He’ll then go to China, which has been the leading U.S. agricultural trade partner most of this year, supplanting Canada. He’ll be part of the American delegation to an annual meeting on a broad range of trade issues.The USDA credits agricultural exports with nibbling away at the U.S. trade deficit. The agency projects an agricultural trade surplus of a record $42.5 billion in 2011. By comparison, Commerce Department figures show the U.S. ran an overall trade deficit of about $500 billion last year.Overall export totals don’t tell the entire story of how farmers are benefiting, however.advertisementTake corn, for example. A recent report by University of Illinois agricultural economists Scott Irwin and Darrel Good pointed out that while fewer tons of corn are being shipped overseas, exports of products made from corn, such as ethanol, distillers dried grains and pork from corn-fed pigs have skyrocketed. So corn farmers are coming out way ahead overall and that’s what matters, Good said.The growth in exports hasn’t cost consumers much because farmers also have increased productivity, Vilsack said. Higher fuel costs have been a more significant factor in food price increases, he said.”I think it is important for the American consumer to understand they’ve got a pretty good deal right now,” Vilsack said. “Roughly 6 to 7 percent of our paychecks are spent on food. When you compare that to most developed nations, we fare very, very well.” PD—AP newswire reportlast_img read more

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Milk prices, margins add urgency to MPP-Dairy revisions

first_imgThe reopening of enrollment for 2018 participation in the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy) took on additional urgency with the release of milk price and feed cost information for January. Meanwhile, dairy cows culled in January 2018 were the highest monthly total in five years. No information on MPP-Dairy enrollment yetAs of Feb. 27, the FSA was still finalizing details before reopening the 2018 enrollment period for MPP-Dairy. Wayne Maloney, in the FSA public affairs office, said USDA staff were putting the final touches on enrollment details and preparing a fact sheet concerning provisions included in a federal budget bill, signed into law Feb. 9. The sign-up period will be for 90 days, but exact dates have not yet been announced.advertisementadvertisementRead: No news regarding MPP-Dairy sign-up yet; Peterson unveils potential change in Farm BillJanuary milk prices tumbleThe handwriting of lower milk prices has been on the wall for a while, with signs of weakening at the end of 2017. On Feb. 27, the USDA National Ag Statistics Service (NASS) released its monthly Ag Prices report, showing the U.S. average milk price was $16.10 per hundredweight (cwt) in January 2018, down $1.10 from December 2017, $2.80 less than January 2017, and equaling the 19-month low of July 2016.Among the 23 major dairy states (Table 1), January prices were $1 or more less than December 2017 in 16 states, led by a $1.60 decline in Illinois and $1.50 drops in Oregon and Wisconsin. The average price dipped below $15 per cwt in Michigan, which held the distinction of the lowest state average. Florida’s average of $20.40 per cwt remained the nation’s high.Compared to a year earlier, January 2018 milk prices were down $3 or more in 12 states.advertisementMPP-Dairy margin shrinksThe USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) also released the MPP-Dairy milk income margin for January and, with the lower milk price, the U.S. average margin over feed costs slipped to $8.12 per cwt. While still above the highest MPP-Dairy insurable trigger level of $8 per cwt, it was the thinnest monthly margin since July 2016 (Table 2).The effect of lower milk prices was compounded by slightly higher feed costs. National average prices for corn ($3.29 per bushel, up 6 cents per bushel from December and the highest since July 2017), alfalfa hay ($152 per ton, up $4 from December and the highest since October 2017) and soybean meal ($322.59 per ton, up $3.37 and the highest since July 2017) resulted in total feed costs of $7.98 per cwt of milk sold, up 14 cents from December.Based on milk and feed futures prices as of Feb. 27, the Program on Dairy Markets and Policy projects monthly MPP-Dairy margins will continue to decline, falling near or below below $7 per cwt from February through June.January dairy cow slaughter highest in five yearsU.S. dairy farmers are milking a lot of cows, but they also culled more cows in January 2018 than in any month in five years, according to USDA records.The culling increase reflects farmers holding onto cows through December, a month when cow prices are generally weakest, and the shrinking milk income margins.advertisementFor January 2018, federally inspected milk cow slaughter was estimated at 289,800 head, 42,500 more than December 2017 and 20,800 more than January 2017. It was the highest monthly total since January 2013, when 296,900 head were removed from milking herds.The USDA’s latest milk production report indicated there were 9.405 million cows in U.S. dairy herd in January 2018, up from 9.369 million head the same month a year earlier. Based on the slaughter estimates, about 3.1 percent of the herd was culled in January 2018, compared to 2.9 percent in January 2017.Read: U.S. milk output, cow numbers start year higherJanuary cull cow prices riseDespite the high culling rate, U.S. average cull cow prices rose in January, although the increase was modest. Cull cow prices (beef and dairy combined) averaged $63.30 per cwt, up $1.30 from December, but 70 cents less than January 2017.   Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairymanEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.comlast_img read more

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Farmington city council to consider property purchases Monday

first_img admin Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) Farmington city officials will on Monday decide whether to purchase two properties connected with redeveloping the former Maxfield Training Center property.Developer AC Acquisitions has proposed a 155-unit apartment complex on the 3-acre site located at 33000 Thomas St., between School and Warner Streets.This image, courtesy Preservation Farmington, shows the location of a house on Grand River that city officials have an option to buy.In a memo to council members, city manager David Murphy said the city in 2015 signed options for properties on Grand River and Thomas, paying owners 10 percent of the purchase price– $25,900 and $20,000, respectively – to gain exclusive rights to buy them. Officials renewed the option in 2016, bringing the total expenditure to more than $90,000.The extensions will expire in September and October, Murphy wrote.Since the city has already paid homeowners 20 percent of the purchase price, he added, “the City Council should complete the two purchases and authorize the City Manager and City Attorney to notify the property owners that the City will be exercising the options and then to take all necessary actions to complete the closings on the properties.”The area labeled “7” in this page from the Downtown Area Plan shows a possible pedestrian/vehicle connection between a Maxfield Training Center project and Grand River. Development concepts in the city’s Downtown Area Plan show houses could be demolished to create a potential pedestrian/vehicle connection that would funnel traffic from the Training Center property to Grand River.Council members will hold a study session at 6 p.m. before the regular 7 p.m. meeting. Both meetings are open to the public, and time is set aside for public comment. Agendas are posted at farmgov.com. Reported bylast_img read more

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F2H Votes: Farmington City Council candidate Jeff Scott

first_img Reported by Farmington Voice sent questionnaires to five Farmington city council and four Farmington Hills city council candidates. Responses are being published in the order they were received. Read all of our election coverage here: farmingtonvoice.com/tag/electionsJeff ScottJeff ScottWhat best qualifies you to serve on Farmington city council?Experience, Experience, Experience. I am fully invested in Farmington. For the past 30 years Farmington has been my home for my wife Anne and our children. During that period, I have been intimately involved with our community in one way or another. I have been involved with the City Administration in various positions for nearly 15 years, the past 4 years, serving on the City Council. Prior to that I served on the Planning Commission and the Zoning Board of Appeals. I also serve as Farmington’s representative on the 8 Mile Boulevard Association and the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments. Additionally, I have served on numerous study committees and boards.So, when discussions concerning the Farmington Vision Plan, Downtown Area Plan, Grand River Corridor Plan, the Parks and Recreation Plan or the Capital Improvement Plan, I don’t just know that they exist, but I have inherent knowledge of it’s content since I was involved with their development. Many of those plans are now showing the fruits of our collective efforts. The redevelopment of the Kmart site, the new Fresh Thyme Grocery, the proposed new development at the Maxfield Training Center and the anticipated new development on the old courthouse property on Ten Mile Road to name a few.Other community activities which I have been involved with include: South Farmington Blues baseball coach (13 years), Director of the South Farmington Blues Invitational Tournaments (9 years), Farmington High School Hockey Booster Club president (5 years) and Farmington First United Methodist Church finance committee and staff parish relations committees.I also bring to the City Council the experience as a registered architect (30+ years) and a business owner for nearly 25 years. 17 years ago, I purchased and renovated the building where our 16 professional employees provide architectural and engineering services regionally as well as nationally. I deal with different communities every day. I am able to gain a unique perspective on what other communities do well and where they fall short. I understand issues regarding our roads, water and sewer systems. I understand the balance between historical preservation, for which I have won awards, and the necessity to grow our tax base. I feel I have the ability to properly lead Farmington into the future.I understand the issues business owners deal with every day. Making payroll, dealing with governmental bureaucracies, personnel issues, creating and maintaining budgets and planning for the future are just a few issues I deal with regularly. I bring a common sense, fiscally sound approach to the Council.There is time for information gathering and contemplation, but endless discussions of issues do not move the City forward. Hard decisions will need to be made and I have a solid track record of accomplishments. I bring to our community, my ties, my commitment, my education, my decision making and extensive experience as a businessman and architect to the City Council, which make me the best qualified candidate.Describe your vision for the future of Farmington looking 10 years ahead.I feel this is the most important task of a City Council Member: How will the policies implemented by the Council impact the future of the City. Some might desire no change to occur. They believe they can hold onto the past, preserve anything old with a new coat of paint will suffice. All the while, change is happening all around us. People’s views on desired businesses, adequate housing or necessary city services, change. Change is inevitable. I believe controlled change, in the manner desired by our neighbors is. positive and healthy. To control change you cannot be reactionary, you need to get out in front of an issue.Farmington is well positioned for the future. Aside from the City Master Plan and the DDA Downtown Master Plan, our neighbors, businesses and stakeholders have already taken the time to delve into various areas of our city to create a more detailed road map for the future. I am proud to say I, along with many of our neighbors have participated in various plans and studies which include: The Farmington Vision Plan, The Downtown Area Plan, The Grand River Corridor Improvement Plan, The Parks and Recreation Master Plan, The Orchard Lake and Ten Mile Intersection Study and the Rouge River Nature Trail Project. As mentioned these plans and studies act as the road map of the desired development.It is with that background that I feel I can confidently follow the road map to imagine what Farmington would look like in 10 years.The new multi-story residential development at the Maxfield Training Center has been completed. As a result of the influx of new downtown residents, new businesses and restaurants have opened in downtown. The retail shops to the east of Fresh Thyme will be reconstructed to multi-story mixed use development. The Farmington Streetscape (similar to the streetscaping along Grand River) has been implemented. A permanent public art program has taken hold with much public support. A new mixed-use development has been constructed on the current city hall site. A new modern city hall is constructed south of downtown.Parking issues are being addressed with public private partnerships. New technology will assist employees and patrons where available parking is located on a real-time basis. Walkability has improved with additional crosswalks and warning beacons. Additional bike lanes have been implemented throughout the city.New mixed-use housing, retail and office developments extending east from the downtown along Grand River to the Rouge River Bridge. The historic Farmington Junction Power House (Winery) will be renovated and repurposed into a mixed-use development which will attract regional interest. As part of that development the beginning of the Rouge River Nature Trail will begin to take place with a river access node. Another river access node is developed at the Grand River Bridge. Because of the Winery renovation, new development is occurring in that entire area.Our real strength will be our neighborhoods. Public Safety services will remain premiere with Farmington continuing to be one of the safest places in the country to live. With the increased walkability, bikeability and the ease of access to the downtown; demand for our neighborhoods will be strong resulting in higher property values. Our current housing stock will continue to be updated by new families which will also keep our school system strong.Our historical district will be strengthened. A consensus will have been developed where the residents of the district acknowledge that instead of owning (in a traditional sense) an historical home, they are actually stewards, preserving the heritage of our community. This is achieved by reasonable, clear and consistent application of the approved guidelines. Residents surrounding the historical district as well as elsewhere throughout the city see how the increased value benefits them; as a result, the size of the historical district increases. New housing is located adjacent to the sledding hill (the sledding hill remains) replacing the old courthouse, school, bus garage and school administration buildings.The growth in development and property values increases our tax base which begins to alleviate the budgetary pressures on city administration. Through attrition, sound financial management and decisions previously made by the City Council, retiree health and pension demands will have subsided and no longer a major obstacle on the City’s budget. Technology has fully taken hold of the public works department with their files and records are fully integrated. Our roads, water and sewer systems will be continually monitored and maintenance and repair programs performed more efficiently and consistently. The budget contains funds for capital improvements for our parks, parking lots, streetscapes, public safety equipment and cultural and recreational activities.Based upon our recent successes and our road maps for the future, Farmington is positioned for prosperity. It is imperative that we maintain our momentum.What is Farmington’s most critical challenge today and how should the community address it?Balancing the budget. Our neighbors expect and deserve high quality services: safe neighborhoods and streets, 2-minute emergency response times, quality roads, dependable sewer and water systems. Curbside leaf pick-up and 24-hour snow plowing are also special services which elevates Farmington as a desirable place to live.Just over half of the City’s revenues come from property taxes. Proposition A combined with the drop in property values resulting from the great recession, means every mil levied by the City generates approximately $100,000 less than 2007. This translates to about 1 1⁄2 million dollars per year. So, for the past 10 years the City has been sustaining our quality services with less revenue.Unfortunately, one of the significant areas which were cut or saw significant reductions was for capital improvements. These are things like maintenance of our roads, water, sewer, parks, parking lots, vehicles, buildings and grounds. The lack of re-investment into our infrastructure and deferred maintenance is beginning to show throughout the City and we need to begin to address this more aggressively. I was a member of the steering committee which recently completed Farmington’s first capital improvement program in many years. The capital improvement program and capital expenditures looked at potential projects over the next 5 years.These were identified as: urgent, necessary-short term, necessary-long term or desired-not necessary. In all, 141 projects were identified with an approximate cost of $28 million.Obviously, we will not be able to address all the projects but we need to have a starting reference point.To put additional pressure on the budget, the Employee’s Retirement Pension System (MERS) changed their amortization policy which over the next five years will raise annual contributions by over $500,000.The State of Michigan is not helping Farmington. The amount of funds (revenue obtained by state income taxes and sales taxes) sent back from the State does not even meet the amount required by our state statute. If you were to compare revenue sharing to local municipalities of every state in the union, Michigan would be dead last. Some states have seen over 100% increases. In fact, Michigan is the only state where there has been a decrease in funding. Until the State of Michigan gets their act together and changes how local municipalities are funded, we are on our own.I am not in favor of raising your taxes to resolve the budget shortfalls. The best way to increase our tax base is to grow our way out. Farmington is an older community which is fully “built out”. We don’t have acres of vacant land where new development can occur. This means some of our structures will be replaced with higher density redevelopment projects. I believe this can be accomplished in a manor desired by the majority of our neighbors and without the City losing its character or heritage.In order to attract new development, we need to allow for the developer to make a profit. So, when you hear people wanting less dense projects, that may sound great, but if the economies of scale diminish, the potential developers will look elsewhere and as a community we are left with a vacant or underutilized building (or property) with no expansion of our tax base. I believe I have the right experience and qualifications to help lead the City out of our budget issues.What do/will you do on a personal level to engage residents in city government and ensure thatyou’re hearing from a broad cross-section of the community?For the past 30 years I have lived, and the past 17 years worked, in the city of Farmington, so I am engaged with the community on a daily basis in one form or another. It’s interesting how much you can ascertain on how the City is functioning and providing services to our citizens just by being around and observing ones surroundings. Are the streets plowed, is the garbage picked up, are the leaves being pick up, what are the conditions of the roads, are there emergency DPW projects underway?That doesn’t mean I have extensive interaction with a broad cross-section of people on a daily basis, but I do think I am to able feel the pulse of the city. I will continue to engage our community by attending as many organizational or group functions held throughout the city as possible. I am always amazed and impressed on how many types there are, each with their own focus throughout the City and most them are volunteer driven. It’s there I can engage and hear from our neighbor’s regarding their issues and concerns.Additionally, our local newspapers and electronic media such as the Voice are good resources for our community. I do go on a few of the social media sites. Unfortunately, there are many times were social media is all about rumors and uninformed rants. I don’t usually respond on the sites since most issues cannot be properly or fully vetted in that format. Also, the social media sites do not represent a full cross-section of our community. They appear to have a greater base of support, but in actuality it is a very vocal but small minority.As I have been out campaigning and knocking on doors for the past few weeks I have been able to engage in a broad cross-section of our community. What I have found, is that what is most important to our neighbors does not extend much beyond their own driveway; safe streets, good roads, reliable water, sewer and electric, trash pickup and they love the curbside leaf pick-up.When I ask them about other issues in the City or other concerns, the majority says they like living in Farmington, they like the direction the City is heading in and keep doing what you are doing.If anyone is interested in contacting me they can go to my webpage at electjeffscott.com or email me at jeff@electjeffscott.com. admin Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Share the Love at Stand with Trans event in Farmington Hills

first_img admin Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) Stand with Trans hosts  “Share the Love,” a family event to celebrate trans children, adolescents and their families, on Saturday, Feb. 10, 5 p.m.-9 p.m., at Orchard United Methodist Church, 30450 Farmington Rd, Farmington Hills.Face painting, music, food and crafts are planned. Families are invited to bring a dish to share and encouraged to dress in festive Valentine’s attire. There is no charge to attend. RSVP to roz@standwithtrans.org or call 248-739-9254.Stand with Trans is a 501(c)(3) whose mission is to provide the tools needed by transgender youth so they will be empowered, supported and validated as they transition to their authentic life. Learn more at standwithtrans.org. Reported bylast_img read more

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Tawheed Center mobile food pantry set February 17

first_imgThe Tawheed Center of Farmington Hills together with Muslim Family Services will host a mobile food pantry from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, February 17.Held at the Tawheed Center, 29707 W. 10 Mile Rd., the pantry is open to all no- or low-income community families and individuals in need. These events are held on the third Saturday of each month.For more information, call 248-252-6962. Reported by admin Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)last_img

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Thistle Rose choirs perform seasonal music in Farmington Hills

first_imgThistle Rose Academy of Arts choirs will perform “Noel,” a concert that celebrates the holidays, on December 13 and 14 at Trinity in the Woods Episcopal Church, 26880 La Muera St. in Farmington Hills.Songs performed will include some well-loved classics, as well as music from around the world. The performance will culminate with a presentation of the “Oratorio de Noêl” by Camille Saint-Saëns.Performances are at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 3 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are $12.You can purchase tickets and learn more at thistleroseacademy.org Reported by Farmington Voice Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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